News The Element: Intel's Push For A Modular PC

bit_user

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the Element can draw up to 225W in total (75W from the PCIe slot and 150W from the 8-pin PCIe power connector). However, it's important to highlight that 225W is distributed between the processor, memory, and storage devices. Depending on the configuration, there might not be enough leftover power for the processor, which could seriously limit the number of processor options on The Element.
If it could take in much more power, I think that fan would surely be a bottleneck for dissipating it.

skeptical that the device finds itself outside the professional market, considering that it would probably have an eye-watering price tag. This is enterprise-grade technology, after all.
I wouldn't assume it's enterprise-grade, just because it has a Xeon CPU. My guess is that it's aimed more at commercial-sector applications where compute requirements are rather high and environmental factors aren't too harsh. Otherwise, you'd use industrial PCs or embedded SBCs.

For enterprise server applications, there have long been blade servers that essentially do the same thing, only denser.

And for enterprise desktops, I think those are all migrating towards laptops and NUCs or mini-PCs. I question whether this would be a proper substitute for anyone needing a proper workstation.
 
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bigdragon

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Intel's Element project appears to be trying to reinvent the blade array. I'm not sure what they're thinking here. Probably something focused on AI.

I'd really like to see computers get smaller. When i saw "modular" in the title I got excited. Intel's NUC is a great form factor hampered by its graphics capabilities. I'd like to see Intel solve the graphics issue. There has got to be a solution to miniaturize the traditional ATX motherboard and dual-slot GPU.
 
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bit_user

Splendid
Herald
I'm not sure what they're thinking here. Probably something focused on AI.
No, not that. AI is way beyond general-purpose CPUs, and even moving past GPUs to purpose-built AI chips. And those chips can go on a PCIe card and slot into a normal server - in no way do they justify something like this.

I'd really like to see computers get smaller. When i saw "modular" in the title I got excited. Intel's NUC is a great form factor hampered by its graphics capabilities. I'd like to see Intel solve the graphics issue. There has got to be a solution to miniaturize the traditional ATX motherboard and dual-slot GPU.
Gen11 graphics scales NUCs from (I think) a max of 48 EUs, previously, to (should be) 64 EUs. Gen12 will be yet more efficient, as well.

In the meantime, Intel had actually released a NUC with a 24-CU Vega (KabyG), but those were recently discontinued.

Plus, there's this:

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-quartz-canyon-nuc-xeon-e,40124.html
 
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R_1

Judicious
Herald
a PC is already modular. built to standards for that reason. this will not address form factor limits nor cross brand compatibility so I do not see the usefulness of this save to employ less skilled workers to maintain more wasteful systems.

from the daughterboard of old to the P3 on a card to this intel loves their SECCs
 
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