Question Tips on upgrading my graphic card from a r9 280x

Jul 15, 2019
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Hi!
So I decided to upgrade my graphics card.
Im currently running this setup:
Asus z97-a with i5-4690K
16 GB ddr3 RAM
r9 280x

I'm going to buy a b450-f gaming and a ryzen 5 2600 soon, but first Im going to upgrade my graphics.
I've been looking at the Vega 56/64, but I kinda heard both good and bad things about them. I dont really know the difference on GDDR and HBM memory, would this mean any problems with my current setup?
And also, all tips are welcome on a new graphics card. Im trying to stay under 400 dollars
 
Probably the most important question: what's the details on your monitor?
  • Resolution?
  • Refresh rate?
  • Does it have FreeSync, G-Sync, or neither?
    • If it has FreeSync, what is the FreeSync range, and does it have LFC (Low Framerate Compensation)?
 
Jul 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
Probably the most important question: what's the details on your monitor?
  • Resolution?
  • Refresh rate?
  • Does it have FreeSync, G-Sync, or neither?
    • If it has FreeSync, what is the FreeSync range, and does it have LFC (Low Framerate Compensation)?
Im running a Asus VP228HE Screen atm, kind of a budget monitor.
1920x1080 LED, 1 ms refresh rate, 60 Hz. I dont think it has FreeSync or G-Sync.
Im planning on upgrading this aswell when theres enough money for it, but it might be a while.
 

punkncat

Respectable
Apr 3, 2018
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I will throw this at you:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html

It is recommended to move at least two tiers up the chart. Note that in the lower section some of the newer cards aren't listed (yet?).

At this time your monitor is really going to limit the noticeable abilities of many of the higher end cards. Where your current CPU will be a limitation as well, the upgrade you are looking at is well regarded in gamer circles.
If it were a "me" situation I would look at nothing less than a GTX1080 or better. Your price point should allow something comparable.

I am currently using a 1080 on a monitor with the same rates as the one you have. Where I am limited in frames, I can play every title I have on Ultra or top settings and maintain right at the 60 or better frame rates.
 
Jul 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
I will throw this at you:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html

It is recommended to move at least two tiers up the chart. Note that in the lower section some of the newer cards aren't listed (yet?).

At this time your monitor is really going to limit the noticeable abilities of many of the higher end cards. Where your current CPU will be a limitation as well, the upgrade you are looking at is well regarded in gamer circles.
If it were a "me" situation I would look at nothing less than a GTX1080 or better. Your price point should allow something comparable.

I am currently using a 1080 on a monitor with the same rates as the one you have. Where I am limited in frames, I can play every title I have on Ultra or top settings and maintain right at the 60 or better frame rates.
Thanks for clearing things up a little. I understand there will be limitations until all my upgrades are done, would updating my CPU first be a better idea?

I believe I'll stay at using AMD, so I guess a Vega 64 or RX 5700 would do the job?
 
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Im running a Asus VP228HE Screen atm, kind of a budget monitor.
1920x1080 LED, 1 ms refresh rate, 60 Hz. I dont think it has FreeSync or G-Sync.
Im planning on upgrading this aswell when theres enough money for it, but it might be a while.
In this case, I would refrain from upgrading your graphics card until you know FOR CERTAIN what resolution and refresh rate you're going for with the monitor you're getting, and even then, wait until you're close to getting the monitor.

There's no point in upgrading your system to display faster than your monitor can manage when you're going to be keeping that monitor for a while.

That way, by the time you actually get close to the new monitor purchase, video cards might be cheaper/faster. The money spent now would be wasted.
 
Jul 15, 2019
7
0
10
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In this case, I would refrain from upgrading your graphics card until you know FOR CERTAIN what resolution and refresh rate you're going for with the monitor you're getting, and even then, wait until you're close to getting the monitor.

There's no point in upgrading your system to display faster than your monitor can manage when you're going to be keeping that monitor for a while.

That way, by the time you actually get close to the new monitor purchase, video cards might be cheaper/faster. The money spent now would be wasted.
Okay! Well, I actually got some extra cash so I can buy a screen aswell.
I just dont think my graphics are good enough.
What about a vega 64/56 and this screen?

  • 24,5" Full HD (1920 x 1080)
  • 144 Hz
  • 1 ms Refresh Rate (GTG)
  • AMD Radeon FreeSync
 
I'm personally a fan of larger screens and ultrawide.

That said, I think that a Vega 56 would do nicely. If you're really trying to push frame rates, then the Vega 64 is the way to go. Both are power hungry, but the Vega 64 ridiculously so. Unless you're getting them at a discount, it might be better to go with the 5700 or 5700XT.

But, if you can get a good deal on a Vega 56, it'll do nicely. You will NOT be breaking 100fps in the latest games with maxed details, but it'll still be a good experience. If crazy fps doesn't matter to you, you might consider using Chill to cap your frames at say, 60, or 75, or something along those lines so that the card isn't constantly trying to run flat out.
 

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