Question Trouble when overclocking AMD FX-6300

Jul 27, 2021
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My PC specs are not the best. I had some issue where I had to return to my old mobo, that means old CPU and old RAM. Anyways, here are them:

-CPU: AMD FX-6300 six core, 3.5GHz
-Motherboard: ASRock N68-GS4 FX
-RAM: 12 Gb DDR3 1333 MHz
-GPU: ADM Radeon R7 360 2Gb DDR5

I know it´s not top of the line, new or super-reliable hardware, but I was wondering if I could get more performance out of somewhere. Here´s when the marvelous idea of overclocking came to my mind. I have never done it before, and I knew that probably is not the best idea, cause of the non-reliability of the mobo. So I looked over in Google, and managed to try some things. The issue comes that when I increase the CPU frequency multiplier, Windows tries to start up, shows the well known blue screen and restarts. So I have to reset the BIOS settings, and everything starts up normally.

I don´t know if to overclock, I also need to increase the voltage relative to the increase of the frequency multiplier or what. I am really new with this, and I don´t want to break any stuff of course. I dont want to fry my CPU at 4.5+ GHz. I want to see if increasing to 3.7-3.8 GHz I can boost up my performance a little bit.
 

mamasan2000

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"I don´t know if to overclock, I also need to increase the voltage relative to the increase of the frequency multiplier or what."

No, at a certain point you will have to increase voltage more than you do Mhz. And once you hit the voltage wall, doesn't matter what voltage you try to run, it just wont boot or the voltage is so high you risk damaging CPU instantly.
You need more and more voltage for less and less clockspeed, is what I am trying to say
 
Jul 27, 2021
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You'll burn those VRMs way before you burn up that CPU.

For piledriver, 4.5GHz is easy. 5GHz is doable, but for that motherboard it is best left at stock.
Yhea, I've been trying some stuff. I got it to 3.7 increasing voltage, but I noticed a decrease of performance over time, which I supposed could mean overheating. So I left the clock in 3.7 and returned the voltage to the original 1.2 V, and everything seemed to run nicely, but I started to have sudden freezings. I think that having a not certified PSU could have influenced in this. So anyways, I left it at stock. Thanks for the advice!
 
Jul 27, 2021
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"I don´t know if to overclock, I also need to increase the voltage relative to the increase of the frequency multiplier or what."

No, at a certain point you will have to increase voltage more than you do Mhz. And once you hit the voltage wall, doesn't matter what voltage you try to run, it just wont boot or the voltage is so high you risk damaging CPU instantly.
You need more and more voltage for less and less clockspeed, is what I am trying to say
Thanks, I tried increasing voltage, but it happened what I explained to damric. I don't wanna mess things up so I'll leave it at stock speed.
 
You will want a PSU with tight ripple suppression for overclocking. ATX spec is very loose and the PSUs that are on the fringe will require your VRMs and caps on your board to work much harder and will require more voltage to compensate, making everything just run much hotter than a good PSU with say, less than 25mV ripple.

If you had a descent board with at least a good 6 phase VRM, and a good PSU, you can really jam as much voltage as you want through those old FX CPUs as long as you can cool it. There's plenty of us hardcore overclockers that were running 1.55-1.6v on air cooling, 24/7 for years and they just wouldn't die. They are much more robust than today's CPUs.
 
Jul 27, 2021
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10
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You will want a PSU with tight ripple suppression for overclocking. ATX spec is very loose and the PSUs that are on the fringe will require your VRMs and caps on your board to work much harder and will require more voltage to compensate, making everything just run much hotter than a good PSU with say, less than 25mV ripple.

If you had a descent board with at least a good 6 phase VRM, and a good PSU, you can really jam as much voltage as you want through those old FX CPUs as long as you can cool it. There's plenty of us hardcore overclockers that were running 1.55-1.6v on air cooling, 24/7 for years and they just wouldn't die. They are much more robust than today's CPUs.
Yhea I know. I don´t have issue with the power output. Theoretically, the PSU has a 750 W output. But it´s generic, and doesn´t give me a good feeling, you know. And of course, the motherboard it's also bottlenecking, so I´ll stick with stock frequencies.
 

mamasan2000

Distinguished
You will want a PSU with tight ripple suppression for overclocking. ATX spec is very loose and the PSUs that are on the fringe will require your VRMs and caps on your board to work much harder and will require more voltage to compensate, making everything just run much hotter than a good PSU with say, less than 25mV ripple.

If you had a descent board with at least a good 6 phase VRM, and a good PSU, you can really jam as much voltage as you want through those old FX CPUs as long as you can cool it. There's plenty of us hardcore overclockers that were running 1.55-1.6v on air cooling, 24/7 for years and they just wouldn't die. They are much more robust than today's CPUs.
I had FX-8350 with a Corsair H100i 240mm Rad running 4.6-4.8 Ghz at 1.52-1.55 for 2-3 years. Then it was slightly degraded. Had to drop to 4-4 or 4.5 Ghz and 1.48-1.50v, can't remember exactly. That system is still up and running, brother uses it daily. Sturdy, yeah.
With Asus Sabertooth, beefy motherboard, best you could get IIRC. 10 phases.
 

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