Question Trying to understand my 10700K. Overclocking and Undervolting (Temps) - Noobie

Apr 3, 2021
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System is primarily for gaming/streaming. I would like to know if I need to even adjust anything to achieve the goals that I want (if reasonable). I am looking to slightly lower the temps of my 10700K while maintaining performance OR improve performance while maintaining or even lower temps - I was told overclocking can even lower temps(?) but first I want to get a baseline. What settings on Prime95 should I setup and how should I prepare for the test? Should I mess with ASUS AI Suite at all orwould proper methodology be in Intel XTU or BIOS?

I ran Intel XTU just now and scored 3094 Marks. Processor Core Ratio 47x, Cache Ratio 43x. Everything is stock. The only thing I have changed in BIOS is turning off Multi Core Enhancement. Here is some info from HWmonitor during the basic Intel XTU test:


* Currently I have about 15 tabs of Chrome open hence the idle temp..


My system is:
ASUS ROG Maximus XII Hero
10700K
3080FTW3 Ultra
2x16GB TridentZ 3600CL16
Noctua U14S w/ TG Kryonaut
2x140 Noctua NFA14 PWM (intake)
1x150mm Noctua NFA15 PWM (exhaust)

Thanks
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Overclocking can be used more or less in the opposite manner for undervolting yes. Depends on your target temperature or power if you need to do more than turn off MCE.

Typically, most motherboards supply too much core voltage, you can try reducing it a little and see if the system is still stable. You can even turn MCE back on and try the same. Or go for something like 4.4-4.5Ghz all core instead of 4.7Ghz.

Best recommendation is always to use the BIOS for overclocking.

As for Prime95, depends on if you are planning for AVX loads or not. I would say these days you want to, so a late version of P95 is fine. Cinebench R20 is closer to a gaming workload though.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
System is primarily for gaming/streaming. I would like to know if I need to even adjust anything to achieve the goals that I want (if reasonable). I am looking to slightly lower the temps of my 10700K while maintaining performance OR improve performance while maintaining or even lower temps - I was told overclocking can even lower temps(?) but first I want to get a baseline. What settings on Prime95 should I setup and how should I prepare for the test? Should I mess with ASUS AI Suite at all or would proper methodology be in Intel XTU or BIOS?

I ran Intel XTU just now and scored 3094 Marks. Processor Core Ratio 47x, Cache Ratio 43x. Everything is stock. The only thing I have changed in BIOS is turning off Multi Core Enhancement.

ASUS ROG Maximus XII Hero
10700K
3080FTW3 Ultra
2x16GB TridentZ 3600CL16
Noctua U14S w/ TG Kryonaut
2x140 Noctua NFA14 PWM (intake)
1x150mm Noctua NFA15 PWM (exhaust)

Thanks
As Eximo pointed out, the best recommendation is always to use BIOS for making adjustments to system parameters, such as Core voltage and frequency. ASUS AI Suite is not recommended, although Intel XTU or Intel Performance Maximizer would be distant second choices.

“Stress” tests vary widely and can be characterized into two categories; stability tests which are fluctuating workloads, and thermal tests which are steady workloads. Prime95 Small FFTs (AVX disabled) is ideally suited for testing thermal performance, because it conforms to Intel's Datasheets as a steady 100% workload with steady Core temperatures.



Note : As per Intel’s Datasheets, TDP and Thermal Specifications are validated “without AVX. Prime95 with AVX test selections enabled will impose an unrealistic 130% workload which can increase Core temperatures by up to 20°C. To correctly set Prime95 to run your CPU at 100% workload, simply click on the AVX test selections that are not greyed out so that all three AVX boxes are checked, as shown above.

Utilities that don't overload or underload your processor will give you a valid thermal baseline. Here’s a comparison of utilities grouped as thermal and stability tests according to % of TDP, averaged across six processor Generations at stock Intel settings rounded to the nearest 5%:



Although these tests range from 70% to 130% TDP workload, Windows Task Manager interprets every test as 100% CPU Utilization, which is processor resource activity, not actual workload. Core temperatures respond directly to Power consumption (Watts), which is driven by workload. Prime95 Small FFTs (AVX disabled) provides the correct workload for testing thermal performance.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Also, keep in mind that Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature, for which the International Standard for "normal" is 22°C or 72°F.

While your screenshot shows a maximum Core temperature of 71°C running Intel XTU, keep in mind that XTU is a fluctuating workload that's only about 80%, whereas CineBench R23, as well as R20, are about 100%, as is Prime95, Small FFTs (No AVX). Even the latest games, a few of which use AVX, will not exceed Prime95 without AVX, as the AVX code used in games is less intense than the AVX code in utilities for testing stability and thermal performance. As you can see from the %TDP table shown above, Prime95 Small FFTs (No AVX) and CineBench R23 (and R20) are similar workloads that differ whereby Prime95 Small FFTs is a continuous steady-state workload, whereas CineBench pauses between rendering passes, which makes it a fluctuating workload.

You may find that your Core temperatures running CineBench or Prime95 Small FFTs might be higher than 85°C, but since you stated that your rig is primarily for gaming / streaming, the heavier of which are typically around 80% workload, that XTU as a stability test and CPU-Z Bench Stress as a thermal test may be more appropriate for your purposes.

The best way to visualize differences in workload behaviors is to observe this on utilities that have a graph, since watching just Core temperature numbers alone does not reveal the "big picture". Here's some Guides to help you understand overclocking, undervolting and temperatures:

CPU Overclocking Guide and Tutorial for Beginners

Intel CPU Temperature Guide 2021

CT :sol:
 
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