Question [TUF X470 PLUS Gaming] Updating to a Newer BIOS to Upgrade my CPU

Wirch

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Currently running a Ryzen 5 2600 and want to upgrade to a 5600. On their website. ASUS says I need to update my BIOS for my new CPU to work. Can I do it just fine with my current CPU in one sweeping flash using the latest BIOS from their website, or will I have issues updating and using the new CPU? I have a friend with my same CPU that updated just fine and he didn't even lose legacy support of his 2600 after the fact, but I want to make sure nothing goes wrong on my end, since I'm also swapping in a new CPU.

Thanks in advance.
 

punkncat

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Currently running a Ryzen 5 2600 and want to upgrade to a 5600. On their website. ASUS says I need to update my BIOS for my new CPU to work. Can I do it just fine with my current CPU in one sweeping flash using the latest BIOS from their website, or will I have issues updating and using the new CPU? I have a friend with my same CPU that updated just fine and he didn't even lose legacy support of his 2600 after the fact, but I want to make sure nothing goes wrong on my end, since I'm also swapping in a new CPU.

Thanks in advance.

Read the notes specific to the BIOS to be sure there isn't a "bridge" that needs to be installed before going to the final version for support. So far as I am aware the 2xxx should still be supported even at that last update. 1xxx I am not so sure about.
 
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Lutfij

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I tend to gradually work my way through to the latest BIOS version(skipping Beta versions) to avoid a mishap with the flashing process. It tends to be a long process but what it does is ensure that your BIOS flashing process isn't botched and you've made incremental updates to the BIOS. What BIOS version are you currently on?

If you do some digging, you'll see there are fringe cases where people jumped to the latest version and ended up with a bricked board.
 

Wirch

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I tend to gradually work my way through to the latest BIOS version(skipping Beta versions) to avoid a mishap with the flashing process. It tends to be a long process but what it does is ensure that your BIOS flashing process isn't botched and you've made incremental updates to the BIOS. What BIOS version are you currently on?

If you do some digging, you'll see there are fringe cases where people jumped to the latest version and ended up with a bricked board.
I'm at 4012 and the 5600 is reportedly usable from 5861 onward, though I think the latest is 6012, or something like that... My friend had to do incremental updates, but that was only because, for some reason, his BIOS wouldn't let him jump straight into the latest version. I wanted to try flashing to the latest, and if I had the same issue, proceed with incremental updates.
 
I'm at 4012 and the 5600 is reportedly usable from 5861 onward, though I think the latest is 6012, or something like that... My friend had to do incremental updates, but that was only because, for some reason, his BIOS wouldn't let him jump straight into the latest version. I wanted to try flashing to the latest, and if I had the same issue, proceed with incremental updates.
For Asus mobo's I'm pretty sure you don't need to do it incrementally. The bios' are not patches/updates, they are fully cleared and re-written as a whole with all fixes and features of previous version.

Otherwise, you will spend a couple of hours at least, doing each one, then clearing CMOS for each one! There are 23 bios more recent than yours.

Whilst I agree with caution, unless the bios notes specifically say it's required to do incremental updates, then go ahead with 5861.

I did see in the notes for some Bios for your mobo, to update with EZ Flash, but that's already within the bios, where you would be updating it from anyway.
 

Wirch

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If you have an issue with a straight jump to the latest BIOS, you can end up with a bricked board...that's why I tread with caution on that arena.
I get what you're saying and I agree with it, but from my current version, it'd take 14 different flashes just to get to 5861. Is it even worth the risk of 14 updates to my BIOS versus one straight flash?

EDIT: Talking to my friend and he just told me he didn't incremental updates, but he simply did 4xxx > 5603 > latest version. This was because his BIOS for some reason didn't let him jump straight to latest.
 

Lutfij

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Because I have seen that with other manufacturers where incremental updates were necessary, but not Asus.
Gigabyte used to detail their BIOS update process, ASRock state a cutoff point and even state not to downgrade the BIOS after X or Y version once updated. MSI tend to keep any relevant info aloof while Asus just state here's the BIOS version and AGESA code. In the past they all were detailed on what was in the BIOS microcode, regardless of board maker.

I apply my method of updating BIOS for all brands of boards. I've learned that the time to factor in with BIOS flashing carefully is cheaper when having to deal with troubleshooting, customer support and RMA's.

it'd take 14 different flashes just to get to 5861
I count 22, excluding the Beta versions. So, I can understand your concern.
 
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Because I have seen that with other manufacturers where incremental updates were necessary, but not Asus.
Gigabyte used to detail their BIOS update process, ASRock state a cutoff point and even state not to downgrade the BIOS after X or Y version once updated. MSI tend to keep any relevant info aloof while Asus just state here's the BIOS version and AGESA code. In the past they all were detailed on what was in the BIOS microcode, regardless of board maker.

I apply my method of updating BIOS for all brands of boards. I've learned that the time to factor in with BIOS flashing carefully is cheaper when having to deal with troubleshooting, customer support and RMA's.
I don't disagree with you at all. In fact I've said as much for other manufacturers, but not Asus (I've had many Asus mobo's - Yeah, I know, I'm a sucker for branding :tearsofjoy:).

And I also agree with being cautious. There's no harm in it, if the OP wants to do that. It will just take a while. But, why not be prudent, like you say!?
 

Wirch

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I don't disagree with you at all. In fact I've said as much for other manufacturers, but not Asus (I've had many Asus mobo's - Yeah, I know, I'm a sucker for branding :tearsofjoy:).

And I also agree with being cautious. There's no harm in it, if the OP wants to do that. It will just take a while. But, why not be prudent, like you say!?
But that's my point, wouldn't flashing a BIOS 22 times be more unwise than doing it once? Insofar as "opportunities for bricking" are concerned.

Update: Also, what does this mean in BIOS version 5216: "c.Removes Gen 4 support when using Ryzen 3000 CPUs "

Would this affect me negatively on my current CPU?
 
But that's my point, wouldn't flashing a BIOS 22 times be more unwise than doing it once? Insofar as "opportunities for bricking" are concerned.

Update: Also, what does this mean in BIOS version 5216: "c.Removes Gen 4 support when using Ryzen 3000 CPUs "

Would this affect me negatively on my current CPU?
Yes, precisely. One update or 23? What would be the chances of bricking the mobo with so many updates? Higher than once, that's for sure.

"c.Removes Gen 4 support when using Ryzen 3000 CPUs "
That won't affect you as your mobo is not PCIe4.
 

Lutfij

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But that's my point, wouldn't flashing a BIOS 22 times be more unwise than doing it once? Insofar as "opportunities for bricking" are concerned.
At the end of the day OP, it's your build, you're going to have to flash the BIOS yourself. All we can do from this end is suggest "do this" or "do that". How you consume and apply that suggestion is up to you.

I don't disagree with you at all. In fact I've said as much for other manufacturers, but not Asus (I've had many Asus mobo's - Yeah, I know, I'm a sucker for branding :tearsofjoy:).
And I also agree with being cautious. There's no harm in it, if the OP wants to do that. It will just take a while. But, why not be prudent, like you say!?

I actually began my HEDT path with an Asus Rampage Extreme X48(build is in my sig, AMS Build log) and have had a soft spot for their stuff...regardless of what people said. Sadly though prior to the pandemic, I've had colleagues who ended up with perfectly working Asus boards being bricked all because Asus pushed forward a BIOS update that was for a security/performance increment. Being an early adopter regardless of tech/BIOS versions/apps has it's downsides but being cautious doesn't.

I actually had to re-flash the BIOS of an old Asus (B85M-G)board using a CH341A programmer since the BIOS decided to corrupt itself and the BIOS FlashBack option wasn't working. So there are mishaps in all camps.
 
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Wirch

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But that's my point, wouldn't flashing a BIOS 22 times be more unwise than doing it once? Insofar as "opportunities for bricking" are concerned.
At the end of the day OP, it's your build, you're going to have to flash the BIOS yourself. All we can do from this end is suggest "do this" or "do that". How you consume and apply that suggestion is up to you.

I don't disagree with you at all. In fact I've said as much for other manufacturers, but not Asus (I've had many Asus mobo's - Yeah, I know, I'm a sucker for branding :tearsofjoy:).
And I also agree with being cautious. There's no harm in it, if the OP wants to do that. It will just take a while. But, why not be prudent, like you say!?

I actually began my HEDT path with an Asus Rampage Extreme X48(build is in my sig, AMS Build log) and have had a soft spot for their stuff...regardless of what people said. Sadly though prior to the pandemic, I've had colleagues who ended up with perfectly working Asus boards being bricked all because Asus pushed forward a BIOS update that was for a security/performance increment. Being an early adopter regardless of tech/BIOS versions/apps has it's downsides but being cautious doesn't.

I actually had to re-flash the BIOS of an old Asus (B85M-G)board using a CH341A programmer since the BIOS decided to corrupt itself and the BIOS FlashBack option wasn't working. So there are mishaps in all camps.
Well, for what it's worth, I sincerely thank you two for your input, and I'm going into this knowing the risks of flashing a BIOS. From what I can see, everything online points towards nothing wrong happening, unless a freak accident or isolated bug/kink in the process. So, I'm just gonna go ahead and flash to the latest and hope it all goes well.

Thanks again for the very quick responses!
 

Wirch

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Updating this thread with some follow-up for closure.

I tried to jump directly into the newest BIOS, which was version 6042, but when I went to choose it in the EZ-Flash utility, it said that it wasn't a valid BIOS file. I then went back to Windows and updated my chipset drivers (since it seemed a common solution), but I was getting the same error. After that, I tried download an older BIOS version (5602), and tried to flash to that one first, which worked. After flashing to 5602, I was able to jump to 6042 without issues.

PS: Those 5 minute flashing periods have been the most nerve wracking thing I've done recently. I hate this and the feeling of vulnerability in case anything goes wrong.
 
Updating this thread with some follow-up for closure.

I tried to jump directly into the newest BIOS, which was version 6042, but when I went to choose it in the EZ-Flash utility, it said that it wasn't a valid BIOS file. I then went back to Windows and updated my chipset drivers (since it seemed a common solution), but I was getting the same error. After that, I tried download an older BIOS version (5602), and tried to flash to that one first, which worked. After flashing to 5602, I was able to jump to 6042 without issues.

PS: Those 5 minute flashing periods have been the most nerve wracking thing I've done recently. I hate this and the feeling of vulnerability in case anything goes wrong.
Worst gamble when updating/flashing BIOS is power interruptions. Modern BIOS are "trained" to reject BIOS file that is not 100% compatible so chances for wrong BIOS is minimal.
One thing that changes most with AMD platform is AGESA code. the rest of bios is more or less same. One thing to pay attention to exact MB version as many other BIOS versions have same number but are different in options.
AMD also recommends updating chipset drivers before BIOS update.
 

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