Unlocking AMD CPU Cores Safe Say Mobo Makers

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brother shrike

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[citation][nom]thisisme[/nom]Intel wouldn't because they do not use a true quad core chip. It's actually two dual core chips. They couldn't disable a core from one dual core set and disable another core from the other dual core set because it wouldn't make sense from a performance standpoint.If they disabled both cores from one dual core side I guess that would work, but would be horribly inefficient, unless they only used this for one specific model and made the rest regular dual cores.[/citation]

you're right about Core 2 quads, but i7s are "true" quad cores.
 

JAYDEEJOHN

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After reading it, I was thinking it was May Day, with all the may this and may that. Listen to MuEngineer, set clocks at at which speed for which core you chose.
One of these days, someone at Toms may actually get a AMD cpu, and know how they function, and then maybe, just maybe, we will get good advice
 

randomizer

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[citation][nom]zonker[/nom]THIS ARTICLE IS INCORRECT.On all Phenom II processors you can adjust the frequency of each core individually using AMD overdrive.[/citation]
If you can't boot the system with the cores unlocked how do you propose to use Overdrive?
 

buzznut

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Well, technically speaking you're really not supposed to overclock your processor because you may encounter bugs, crashes, instability or decreased processor life. I guess I don't see where unlocking a core is any more dangerous than overclocking, which most enthusiasts have no problem with accepting that kind of risk, we've been doing it for years.

It may be more commonplace in the months to come. It may also become (or already is) a feature that manufacturers allow to ship out, like an unlocked multi. Ya know, "here's a cpu with an unlocked multiplier, just don't overclock it, ok?" (wink, wink, nudge nudge)

And you already own that song your downloading, right? rriiiiggghht.
 

m3kt3k

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This is a VERY old trick. IBM used to do the same thing. The really bad ones ended up in teddy Ruspin (or how ever its spelled) Old SX chips were DX's that had a bad math CoProcessor. Man I guess I date my self when im going all the way back to 486's
 

cinergy

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If you are a gamer, occasional glitches really don't matter at all (if there even are any). I wouldn't leave those unlocked cores on a database server.
 

zonker

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[citation][nom]randomizer[/nom]If you can't boot the system with the cores unlocked how do you propose to use Overdrive?[/citation]

If the core is complete broken obviously you can't use it.
However if it is just a matter of a lower clock, you set bios at the clock speed of the slowest core. Then set AMD overdrive to automatically kick the other cores upto higher speeds on startup. Overdrive is designed to do this.
 

mindless728

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you know, everyone seems to be saying they are all defective, when in fact they aren't, what happens is a batch has so many defective then they label the whole batch as defective, the other thing that could be happening is binning, meaning they need so many of each processor (thats what they want to sell, supply and demand) so they effectively bin cpus lower than what they are to sell them as a lower chip
 

buzznut

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I have heard Biostar, particularly the model I own Tforce TA790-GX or the one with sideport memory TA790GX-128M. These both run around 100US, a few dollars more for the side port model.

Even if you are unable to unlock any cores, these are feature rich boards for the price and decent overclockers too.
 

FSXFan

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[citation][nom]haricotvert[/nom]Just buy a quad-core if you want a quad-core. Save yourself the headache, risk, and uncertainty.[/citation]

Great advice for non-adventurous types, but some people enjoy doing things just because they can. My CPU is running 25% OC'ed right now. It's not giving me headaches or uncertainty, and I don't feel like I'm taking a big risk. If I had a Phenom II that was unlockable I would have to at least test it out for a while, and if it ran good enough for me it would stay. I'm not running a server though, my PC is more a toy with no critical data that can't be restored easily.
 

androticus

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The cores may or may not be defective. The manufacturer will always shuttle partially defective or sub-performing parts into lower bins, including higher cores to lesser cores. But if their yields and performance exceeds the demand for the lower bin parts, then they will simply shuttle perfectly good parts into the bin. You have no way of knowing WHY your part got into your hands, whether because of defects/lower performance, or just economics. And you have virtually no way of testing, since the defect (if even present) could be marginal or obscure.

Anyone unlocking disabled cores is imho certifiably insane. It would be fitting (in the Darwinian sense) if their defect manifested in high frequency video oscillations that induced a fatal seizure.
 

jaragon13

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[citation][nom]thisisme[/nom]Intel wouldn't because they do not use a true quad core chip. It's actually two dual core chips. They couldn't disable a core from one dual core set and disable another core from the other dual core set because it wouldn't make sense from a performance standpoint.If they disabled both cores from one dual core side I guess that would work, but would be horribly inefficient, unless they only used this for one specific model and made the rest regular dual cores.[/citation]
Pentium D ? :)
 

bk420

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The thrill of cheap speed! Heck yeah! Why not give it a try!

This is like turning and old Athlon XP into and Athlon MP! COOL!
 

starryman

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[citation][nom]sandmanwn[/nom]I think this just about settles it. Tuan knows jack shit nothing.[/citation]
He's reported what was being said on the inside at the mobo companies. What part of the article is incorrect? If you are so smart why do you come to THG? Read the full article before criticizing.
 

sandmanwn

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Wrong, the motherboard manufacturers are saying go ahead, tuan is interdicting a fear response no.

Tuan clearly points out "The reason for this is that the disabled cores are turned off for a reason: they failed factory tests. Cores can fail for any number of reasons, including defects in the silicon, problems running at full frequency, or a bug introduced during manufacturing." Which we know to be garbage.

Its been explained a number of times by people with actual incite into the industry that cores are disabled as needed by market demands. There is nothing inherently dangerous in unlocking cores by people who are enthusiasts. The reason there are 2 and 3 core PII is due to poor yields at the beginning of product cycles. Over time the process evolves to a point where yields are better than the market segment created to cater them can support the demand. Its not rocket science or a great mystery that they disable cores to meet demand.

Whats the point of coming to THG if you don't push the envelope. Thats why we are here anyway isnt it? We are enthusiasts. If you aren't so smart to know better, why are you here?
 

jerryoblego

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In my experience, it is not safe to unlock those hideen cores of Phenom II x2 555 black edition. My computer started to have saome troubles in detecting its hard disk when it is in quad core mode. Now I switched back to dual core mode and I do not experience those problems with hard disk issues anymore
 

tonymena84

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well i bet what has happened is amd has noticed that consumers like to get more for what they paid for. so they produced a cpu that can be tinkered with. as for the fact that some people have issues when unlocking them. amd says oh well we covered are but.so deal with it. this would make it stress free for them even if a problem was their fault because they have already found a way to get customers to live with it.
i agree with buzznut.
a feature that manufacturers allow to ship out, like an unlocked multi. Ya know, "here's a cpu with an unlocked multiplier, just don't overclock it, ok?" (wink, wink, nudge nudge)

and then when things go wrong they can just shrug their shoulders and say hey we put a disclaimers sticker on the box. you knew the risk you took.

this keeps money in their pockets. some people win some loose and amd wins either way.
 

campdude

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I just got a sempron 140... got it for 40 dollars. Will unlock it because im interested in seeing what happens. The next thing is, im only waiting for BD to get released, this sucker is temporary for a few months here.

These cheap CPU's can be replaced.
 
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