Question Upgrading a bottlenecked pc

Oct 28, 2020
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So I am going to upgrade my current pc, I have some parts already picked out. My main concern is whether or not it will fix my performance issues when playing games or running software.

My current pc build consists of

an FX-6350 processor,

an old am3+ slot Gigabyte motherboard (couldn't find specific),

16gb DDR3 ram,

and an RX 570 GPU.


I am planning to upgrade to a Ryzen 3 3100 processor, 16gb of DDR4 ram, and a Gigabyte B550M motherboard.

I'm not sure if the bottleneck with my current build could potentially affect my GPU's performance, but I think this build will overall give me a more solid pc. I would appreciate any feedback on the build or if this would actually fix the issues I'm having with performance. Thanks.
 
Oct 28, 2020
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Remove the term "bottleneck" from your thought process.
Swapping in better parts does not make the system run slower.
Sorry, my main question is whether or not my current build may have affected whether or not my GPU's performance has degraded overall.
 
There is no such thing as "bottlenecking"
If, by that, you mean that upgrading a cpu or graphics card can
somehow lower your performance or FPS.
A better term might be limiting factor.
That is where adding more cpu or gpu becomes increasingly
less effective.

Your plan to change out your FX cpu is a good idea.
FX is all but obsolete, the cores are very slow.
Fast single thread speeds are arguably the most important cpu metric for gaming.
To that end, consider a i3-10100 processor as a entry level gamer.
It will cost less than a 3100 and perform better.
Here is a review:
https://www.techpowerup.com/review/intel-core-i3-10100/15.html
 

lordmogul

Honorable
Jun 14, 2014
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Best way to check for "bottlenecks" is to just run the game and check the load on your components. And yes, don't think of a bottleneck but more of what the limiting part is.

Without vsync or fps limiter (and no hard coded limiter by the game) having your GPU sit on 95%+ load should mean it is the limiting factor. To verify that you could just change resolution (which in 99% of games should only affect the GPU), if the framerate changes with it, you're probably GPU limited.
For the CPU it's a bit more complicated, as even a single thread/core can be the limit, so in case of the FX-6350 (with 6 "cores") it could be on only 1/6= around 16-17% CPU load.
 
Game performance will be limited by either the cpu or the graphics card.

You can try this simple test:
Run YOUR games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
This makes the graphics card loaf a bit.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.
If your FPS stays the same, you are likely more cpu limited.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
There is no such thing as "bottlenecking"
If, by that, you mean that upgrading a cpu or graphics card can
somehow lower your performance or FPS.
A better term might be limiting factor.
That is where adding more cpu or gpu becomes increasingly
less effective.

Your plan to change out your FX cpu is a good idea.
FX is all but obsolete, the cores are very slow.
Fast single thread speeds are arguably the most important cpu metric for gaming.
To that end, consider a i3-10100 processor as a entry level gamer.
It will cost less than a 3100 and perform better.
Here is a review:
https://www.techpowerup.com/review/intel-core-i3-10100/15.html
Only because of the CCX configuration of the i3 3100. If it were a 3300x, or any other Zen 2 chip, then a locked intel cpu will fall behind, when on a B or H chipset, with 2666 ram, vs even budget ddr4 3200 on the AMD side. Initial performance would be better, but any CPU upgrade would be worse, on Intel, than an upgrade on the Ryzen platform. With the RX 570 both would perform about the same regardless.
 

assasin32

Distinguished
Apr 23, 2008
1,356
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I ran an older AMD I think 2 generations behind yours with a 1050 gtx, it was bottlenecking the GPU. I’m pretty sure your CPU is limiting your GPU’s potential. Easy way is to look up FPS benchmarks people have done with your GPU in a game you own, it will give you a ballpark idea of what your looking at gaining.
 

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