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Question Using older versions of Windows 10 for clean install

jailhousews

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May 8, 2012
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Recently did a clean install of Windows 10 on a new PC. First of all, I downloaded the media creation toolkit and began creating/downloading .iso. I'm pretty sure it asks whether you want Home or Pro but I checked the DVD I made a while back to install Windows 10 Home on my laptop and found it contains both versions. So instead of waiting for my slow internet connection I just reused the old DVD.

After installing Windows (version 1903) I proceeded to intall drivers, configure settings, and perform Windows updates. It failed a few but then succeeded with them after trying again. The last update just kept on failing though, it was cumulative update for Windows version 1903. Then I noticed Windows was telling me I was on version 1909 somehow already... so I cleared everything from the softwaredistrubtion and catroot folders and launched update again, now it was downloading cumulative update for 1909 instead. All good, right?

No, because after restart I was stuck in a boot loop BSOD and ended up having to system restore which took me back to when it was freshly installed. The second time, however the updating process worked flawlessly.

So, is it not a good idea to use old installation media?
 
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There is nothing specifically wrong with using an old install media, but as you learned it can be problematic. After doing so you would be advised to let Windows 10 do all it's updating, before you start installing drivers, unless the driver is for the internet.

In the future, you should let the MS Media Creator to make the install USB, rather than downloading the ISO. You should also take notice what version of Windows you have for future reference.
 
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jailhousews

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There is nothing specifically wrong with using an old install media, but as you learned it can be problematic. After doing so you would be advised to let Windows 10 do all it's upgrading, before you start installing drivers, unless the driver is for the internet.

In the future, you should let the MS Media Creator to make the install USB, rather than downloading the ISO. You should also take notice what version of Windows you have for future reference.
I don't see why I should use USB over DVD other than faster install time? And why should it matter if I know which version of Windows I'm actually installing (I did know that it was 1903) if I'm using automatic updates afterwards to get it current, not manually downloading them. I never had any trouble that I can recall with Windows XP or Windows 7 with installing, then letting it update itself. No one created a brand new up-to-date disc every time they installed Windows back then (sometimes I did by slipstreaming updates especially with XP near the end of it's support). Windows 10 is different though in the way it's being updated/changed very frequently, so I guess it's more chance for things to go wrong.

I think maybe Windows decided to install the version 1909 out of order when it should have done it after any 1903 updates that weren't already included in the version update.
 
When I said version, I meant Home or Professional. Also, I was talking about whether to have the MSMCT make a USB or downloading the ISO and creating an ISO with a program like rufus. There is nothing wrong with using a DVD to install Windows 10.
 

jailhousews

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When I said version, I meant Home or Professional. Also, I was talking about whether to have the MSMCT make a USB or downloading the ISO and creating an ISO with a program like rufus. There is nothing wrong with using a DVD to install Windows 10.
Ok, yeah I had purchased a product key for Windows 10 Pro and the DVD I had already I made to install Home on the laptop before. But when I checked it out I discovered it had both Home and Pro on the disc anyway, and after installation Windows was reporting I did indeed have Pro installed and activated. I wonder why micrsoft asks you when creating your install disc/usb which it is if it's just gonna include both anyway?
 

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