Question using second router for second ethernet output out of a coaxial?

xrayman2

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Using a second router for second ethernet output out of a coaxial?

So we have a router in our office and 3 people who have to work there. very packed, so I wanted to move down to my basement. The wifi was so bad that it just wasn't feasible. We do have coaxial cables that all connect around the house. one of them connects to the basement but it's not connected to the coax that carries the signal. My question is is it possible to somehow get ethernet out of the coax coming to the basement? either with a coax splitter and a second router? Anyway, I'm grasping at straws so if it might work I am definitely willing to try it.

thanks for any help
 

USAFRet

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Not a router, but rather a pair of MOCA devices.

One next to the main router, and the second one in the location where there is coax.
These: https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-MoCA-Network-Adapter-Ethernet/dp/B088KV2YYL

One injects the signal into the coax, the other extracts it out to a PC or switch and multiple systems.

If by any chance you have Verizon FiOS, that FiOS router is one half of the pair.


Router -> Moca #1 -> coax cable -> Moca #2 (basement)-> PC or switch
 

xrayman2

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Feb 15, 2017
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Not a router, but rather a pair of MOCA devices.

One next to the main router, and the second one in the location where there is coax.
These: https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-MoCA-Network-Adapter-Ethernet/dp/B088KV2YYL

One injects the signal into the coax, the other extracts it out to a PC or switch and multiple systems.

If by any chance you have Verizon FiOS, that FiOS router is one half of the pair.


Router -> Moca #1 -> coax cable -> Moca #2 (basement)-> PC or switch
so I would basically have to get another coax back to the room with all the connections around the house? or would it run it both ways? and this also means I would need a coaxial splitter?
the main thing is that the router is connected to the coaxial that is coming from outside.

I'm not very informed about this stuff so sorry if I'm not grasping it very well, and unfortunately, I don't have a FiOS
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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so I would basically have to get another coax back to the room with all the connections around the house? or would it run it both ways? and this also means I would need a coaxial splitter?
the main thing is that the router is connected to the coaxial that is coming from outside.

I'm not very informed about this stuff so sorry if I'm not grasping it very well, and unfortunately, I don't have a FiOS
Is there already coax in the house?
Not counting that single line that comes in and connects to the router?

If you don't already have this coax all over, then it would be just as easy to run actual ethernet cable from the router to your desired location.
 

gggplaya

Distinguished
Yes, it might be possible to use that coax to connect to the main router, using a splitter. Make sure the splitter is full range 5-2300mhz. MOCA operates about 1000mhz and many older splitters are only 5-1000mhz.

The problem is you said the coax is not connected to the main home splitter or cable that your router is connected to. This may bea simple fix. You need to find your home's main splitter and see if there are any lines disconnected. Comcast disconnected all the cables not in use at my parents house when they were having issues. So you it might be possible all you have to do is screw it in at the main splitter.

If the cable in your basement is not RG6, it's possible your cable company ran a new line from outside the house, and into a new wall outlet at the modem. I've seen them do this, which bypasses all the home's wiring completely. In this case, you won't be able to connect to your home's coax wiring.

You have some investigation to do:
  1. Find out if you have a main home splitter.
  2. Follow the cable lines to see where they go.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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If the cable in your basement is not RG6, it's possible your cable company ran a new line from outside the house, and into a new wall outlet at the modem. I've seen them do this, which bypasses all the home's wiring completely. In this case, you won't be able to connect to your home's coax wiring.
Thisis still easily doable, if all the other coax is connected to each other.
The coax from the ISP to the router is of no consequence.

Router, ethernet cable, MOCA 1, house coax, MOCA 2, ethernet, PC.
 
Reactions: SamirD
Moca and powerlines are your two solutions--of the two, powerlines are the easiest as you'll plug them in and in 5 minutes know if it's going to work and be fast enough. Moca is much faster, but you got to have a wire at both spots that can be connected together--literally--I just used a barrel connector and connected the two ends in my demarc for my moca run. ;) After that, it was 5 seconds to plug in my moca adapters and have 900Mbps flowing through them. :D
 

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