Question Voltage on Ryzen 7 3700x

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Oct 1, 2019
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Hi folks!

Very informative post btw, thanks!

Just found it after looking for some info about the relatively high temps on my new 3700X, replacing my 1800X. For the time being, I am testing it on my X470 AORUS GAMING 7 WIFI (F42b bios) until I receive the ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Impact for my planned Mini ITX build.

@rigg42 I would really appreciate your take on a few things as you seem to have a good understanding on how 3rd gen Ryzen works.

Starting off I just wanna give some facts.

According to Argus Monitor my idle temps are hovering anywhere between the high 30s up to 50C, usually around 45-51C with some really sudden fluctuations even with minor tasks. Temps under Cinebench 20 load are around 70-72 even when I OC'ed it to 4.3. I haven't run a full Intel Burn test to see what would happen under a sustained load for an hour.
(A small note here is that Ryzen Master usually shows me much lower temps at idle).

I am running the latest bios of my mobo, the latest chipset drivers, Ryzen's balanced power scheme, default bios settings (except XMP) and I have tried both my Noctua NH-U14S and my Be Quiet Dark Rock Pro 4 with the proper amount of thermal paste using the X method. The room is air-conditioned and has an ambient temp of 24-25C. Pretty much the same I used for my 1800X.

Coming from the 1800X (which idled STEADILY around 32-35C and a delided 8700K with similar temps in my other rig, these temps make me kind of uncomfortable. Yes, I read your post about electromigration, current draw and core count comparison and yes, I have also read a bunch of other posts pointing out that current bioses are still unnecessarily using high voltages on the auto setting but still wanted to ask. And yes, I did read AMD_Roberts's post about temp swings.

Should I just ignore this until the Bioses mature or is that just the nature of the beast?
Is my monitor tool giving me false readings? What do you use to monitor CPU temps in-tray?
Should I just switch to the Windows balanced plan? My mobo doesn't have a Normal option for Cpu voltage.

According to your very interesting post explaining how Ryzen 3000 operates, you write that when all cores are heavily loaded, vcore will go down to the low 1.3 range and will hover at around 0.9 in idle. It will only boost up to 1.4, 1.45 when doing small tasks. It's true, I noticed it in Ryzen Master. So why does the chip run so hot? From what I have noticed, C-States (if that it correct) seem to work fine.

On another note, I made some attempts to OC the chip, both through the bios and Ryzen Master. Although I managed to improve Cinebench results and get a 5172, I noticed that it made little to no difference when I benchmarked the CPU in a game like CIV6. Auto, 4.2 OC and 4.3 OC game me relatively similar results.

Am I understanding correctly that OC'ing has little to no benefit on this chip? Am I better off, just leaving settings on Auto and just try to optimize my ram and infinity fabric speed? I have a Samsung b-die 3200Mhz kit that I am trying to tweak using Dram Calculator and it seems to be responding well.

What works best for you guys for gaming? What is the optimal solution that maintains low temps? How do I know if I have a good chip or not? It was fairly easy to discern that with the previous tech.
Asking cause you wrote that setting manual Vcore with the multiplier on Auto kills performance. However, here, I found a post of a guy having varied results in CB with different voltages (no multiplier set from what I understand). I don't know how these gains translate to RL applications though.

In any case, apologies for rambling on and writing such a long post, just wanted to get all the info sorted in my head now that I got my new chip.

Thanks again for all the info!
 

rigg42

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@rigg42 I would really appreciate your take on a few things as you seem to have a good understanding on how 3rd gen Ryzen works.
Sure thing.

According to Argus Monitor my idle temps are hovering anywhere between the high 30s up to 50C, usually around 45-51C with some really sudden fluctuations even with minor tasks. Temps under Cinebench 20 load are around 70-72 even when I OC'ed it to 4.3. I haven't run a full Intel Burn test to see what would happen under a sustained load for an hour.
(A small note here is that Ryzen Master usually shows me much lower temps at idle).
I'm not familiar with Argus Monitor but it's safe to assume that it's probably triggering boost behavior or isn't properly reading temp data. I'd trust what RM is telling you. Voltage and frequency boosts from minor background tasks (or even rapid mouse movements) can and will give you temp spikes. This is normal for these CPU's.

I am running the latest bios of my mobo, the latest chipset drivers, Ryzen's balanced power scheme, default bios settings (except XMP) and I have tried both my Noctua NH-U14S and my Be Quiet Dark Rock Pro 4 with the proper amount of thermal paste using the X method. The room is air-conditioned and has an ambient temp of 24-25C. Pretty much the same I used for my 1800X.

Coming from the 1800X (which idled STEADILY around 32-35C and a delided 8700K with similar temps in my other rig, these temps make me kind of uncomfortable. Yes, I read your post about electromigration, current draw and core count comparison and yes, I have also read a bunch of other posts pointing out that current bioses are still unnecessarily using high voltages on the auto setting but still wanted to ask. And yes, I did read AMD_Roberts's post about temp swings.

Should I just ignore this until the Bioses mature or is that just the nature of the beast?
Is my monitor tool giving me false readings? What do you use to monitor CPU temps in-tray?
Should I just switch to the Windows balanced plan? My mobo doesn't have a Normal option for Cpu voltage.
The CPU has a power and temperature budget. If the load, current, and temperature conditions are correct it will use that power and temp headroom to boost the CPU as much as possible. Whether it dumps a bunch of voltage and frequency at one core or less voltage and frequency at a bunch of cores it will use it's temp and power budget. The power plans that come with the chipset drivers also allow the CPU to boost on a hair trigger. I'd say you don't really need to worry about anything but heavy (high current) load temps. In a modern OS the CPU is almost never truly idle so light tasks will trigger boost and higher "idle temps".

This video isn't particularly easy to follow but does do a decent job of covering some of this:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORHYffg5ipM



According to your very interesting post explaining how Ryzen 3000 operates, you write that when all cores are heavily loaded, vcore will go down to the low 1.3 range and will hover at around 0.9 in idle. It will only boost up to 1.4, 1.45 when doing small tasks. It's true, I noticed it in Ryzen Master. So why does the chip run so hot? From what I have noticed, C-States (if that it correct) seem to work fine.
Because of the voltage temp curve of the silicon and the chiplet design. Temps will get high when you start pumping current and frequency through any CPU. This is exacerbated by the fact that you have a very small die area containing the CPU cores. This die area is getting very hot under a small section of the IHS. This concentrated area of heat makes it difficult to dissipate said heat.


On another note, I made some attempts to OC the chip, both through the bios and Ryzen Master. Although I managed to improve Cinebench results and get a 5172, I noticed that it made little to no difference when I benchmarked the CPU in a game like CIV6. Auto, 4.2 OC and 4.3 OC game me relatively similar results.

Am I understanding correctly that OC'ing has little to no benefit on this chip? Am I better off, just leaving settings on Auto and just try to optimize my ram and infinity fabric speed? I have a Samsung b-die 3200Mhz kit that I am trying to tweak using Dram Calculator and it seems to be responding well.

What works best for you guys for gaming? What is the optimal solution that maintains low temps? How do I know if I have a good chip or not? It was fairly easy to discern that with the previous tech.
This is a tough one to answer. No game presents the same workload. It's possible that you could either decrease or increase gaming performance depending if the game is more single thread dependent vs highly multi threaded. I'd expect a 4.3 ghz all core OC to basically match stock (real world) single thread performance and give a significant advantage over stock in any heavy multi-threaded workload.

Every CPU overclocks differently. Cinebench stable isn't 24-7 stable. 4.3 is a pretty good overclock for a 3700x and probably isn't truly stable at safe voltage unless you have a good chip. Be careful with the voltage. I wouldn't recommend more than 1.325 V max under heavy load as read from SV12 in HWinfo64. HWI64 is the preferred monitoring tool for most people who overclock. Voltage under load is affected by V Droop and how much LLC you use to compensate. It's not as simple as just typing a voltage into BIOS. I do not recommend auto voltage for manual OC's. I recommend doing your OC in the BIOS, using manual voltage, with enough LLC to compensate for the majority of the voltage drop under heavy load. A slight drop is fine but a boost (SV12 HWI64) means you are using too much LLC. When I say heavy load I mean an all core stress test. The current version of Prime95 with all AVX disabled (v26.6 has no AVX as an alternative) running small FFT will give you a 100% high current load and will tell you where your load voltage is at and how hot your CPU will run under this condition. I'd prefer to be in the mid 70's although 80 c is likely safe if you don't stress your CPU with heavy all core loads frequently.

Per CCX overclocking is an option as well. I'm not sure it's as good on 2 CCX chips as it is on a 4 CCX chip but it's possible an all core overclock is being held back by the worst of 2 CCX's. This method is clumsy as hell in Ryzen Master (like any OC'ing in software IMO) but your C8 impact should have the option in bios on the latest version. My C8H does. This does take a lot of trial and error and isn't for the faint of heart. I may put out a guide when I have time to install the custom loop in my 3900x rig.



Asking cause you wrote that setting manual Vcore with the multiplier on Auto kills performance. However, here, I found a post of a guy having varied results in CB with different voltages (no multiplier set from what I understand). I don't know how these gains translate to RL applications though.
An offset or a fixed voltage will limit performance under some load conditions and might not during others. A safe fixed voltage with auto clocks will hurt single core performance across the board. Too high of an offset will hurt all around performance. A slight offset might be fine but the problem is every load is different so this is impossible to test properly. Auto clocks should have auto voltages on the 3000 CPU's IMO. My opinion is there is 3 ways to run these CPU's that makes sense.

  1. Leave them on Auto for optimal SC performance.
  2. All core OC them within 100 mhz of the max turbo at fixed 1.325 v and trade some SC performance for a lot of AC performance.
  3. OC each CCX individually at fixed 1.325 v or less and try to get the best of both worlds.
If you enjoy tweaking your system more than playing games like I do than #2 or #3 is worth exploring if you have the mobo and cooling to do it. If you just want to play games don't worry about this stuff too much and leave it stock. As long as heavy load temps are fine don't sweat it. 50 c at "idle" isn't dangerous to the CPU.

I think the RAM OC is worth it. Since almost no I/O dies will run the fabric clock above 1900 mhz it doesn't really make sense to go above 3800. You can overcome the penalty of not running 1 to 1 if you can hit like 5000 but that isn't realistic for most. 3200 CL14 will also work great. I think tweaking the timings is worth it but YMMV with actual performance benefits. It's pretty easy with DRAM calc but can get a bit frustrating when you get post failures. It's all about your comfort level with tweaking. I'd aim for 3600/1800 or 3800/1900 with tight timings on auto SOC, VDDG, VDDP voltage. Memtest86 to stability test.
 
Oct 1, 2019
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First of all a very big thanks for the detailed response, it's greatly appreciated.
The whole thread should be pinned, I find that it is highly informative for those wanting to find out more about how 3rd gen ryzen works.

I'm not familiar with Argus Monitor but it's safe to assume that it's probably triggering boost behavior or isn't properly reading temp data. I'd trust what RM is telling you. Voltage and frequency boosts from minor background tasks (or even rapid mouse movements) can and will give you temp spikes. This is normal for these CPU's.
Ok, understood. Do you know of any other temp reading software (that sits in the tray) that is able to monitor Ryzen 3 temps accurately without triggering boost behaviour? I don't want to have RM open all the time.

The CPU has a power and temperature budget. If the load, current, and temperature conditions are correct it will use that power and temp headroom to boost the CPU as much as possible. Whether it dumps a bunch of voltage and frequency at one core or less voltage and frequency at a bunch of cores it will use its temp and power budget. The power plans that come with the chipset drivers also allow the CPU to boost on a hair trigger. I'd say you don't really need to worry about anything but heavy (high current) load temps. In a modern OS the CPU is almost never truly idle so light tasks will trigger boost and higher "idle temps".
This video isn't particularly easy to follow but does do a decent job of covering some of this:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORHYffg5ipM
Interesting video, I had seen that back when it was released but I think the tool only works with Asus mobo's.
Is there any chance that they will release a bios with CCX overclocking? Just read below that your C8 has it, so I will give it go on mine if I buy it.

Because of the voltage temp curve of the silicon and the chiplet design. Temps will get high when you start pumping current and frequency through any CPU. This is exacerbated by the fact that you have a very small die area containing the CPU cores. This die area is getting very hot under a small section of the IHS. This concentrated area of heat makes it difficult to dissipate said heat.
Understood. I also saw one of Wendell's vids on how to apply thermal paste to 3rd gen Ryzen too. It seems like it's a funny chip to cool based on the different layout from anything previously released.
How's the FUMA2 working out for you? I am still looking for the best cooling solution for my ITX build with the C8 (haven't ordered it yet as I was waiting for Bullzoid's review for VRM's). I prefer water cooling though, just for its aesthetics.

This is a tough one to answer. No game presents the same workload. It's possible that you could either decrease or increase gaming performance depending if the game is more single thread dependent vs highly multi threaded. I'd expect a 4.3 ghz all core OC to basically match stock (real world) single thread performance and give a significant advantage over stock in any heavy multi-threaded workload.

Per CCX overclocking is an option as well. I'm not sure it's as good on 2 CCX chips as it is on a 4 CCX chip but it's possible an all core overclock is being held back by the worst of 2 CCX's. This method is clumsy as hell in Ryzen Master (like any OC'ing in software IMO) but your C8 impact should have the option in bios on the latest version. My C8H does. This does take a lot of trial and error and isn't for the faint of heart. I may put out a guide when I have time to install the custom loop in my 3900x rig.
Yeah, I've read that a lot and I am just fiddling around just for the fun of it but my X470 AORUS GAMING 7 WIFI isn't helping, it doesn't have the features the C8 has.
TBH, I am happy with the chip's performance. I just want to find the optimal setup, which for me is the best possible performance at acceptable temps. I have done the same on my existing gaming rig, which the ITX build will replace.
My delided 8700K @4.9 (cooled by a Kraken X72) runs idle at 35c and never exceeds 72c under stress testing or 65c when gaming. I spent a good time tweaking everything (including pumps speeds on both the CPU and GPU and fan curves to achieve that). I want a quiet rig as it sits next to my monitor and my Macbook and I mostly work on the Mac. I only use it to game.
I want to feel comfortable enough to justify my switching a set up that runs perfectly well for gaming. If I don't feel that I can achieve this, I'll move to a totally different direction, leaving my 3700X in my work rig with the X470 and will downsize my Intel setup and pop my 8700K in a mini itx setup...

Finally, just wanna say that the highest I can get my B-die kit to pass memtest with Fast settings from Dram Calculator is 3466. Infinity fabric set to half the speed (1733).
Regarding CPU OC, I really don't know how to play around on the Gigabyte board. If I set a fixed voltage of 1.325, what are my next steps? Do I manually set core speed and disable PBO and just slowly push the clocks and test? As I wrote, from everything I have read, only CCX overclocking makes sense on these chips for gaming and optimal temps and I don't want to spend 400$ on a CH8 just to test that.

With my 8700K and Maximus Hero, I know that my starting point is 1.3V and I'd play around that to see how high I could get with a small AVX offset after maxing out all the other settings.

Again, thanks for everything man. You have at least made me feel comfortable with the purchase - even if it means that there is no much fun in tinkering any more :)
 
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rigg42

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First of all a very big thanks for the detailed response, it's greatly appreciated.
The whole thread should be pinned, I find that it is highly informative for those wanting to find out more about how 3rd gen ryzen works.
No problem. Happy to help.



Ok, understood. Do you know of any other temp reading software (that sits in the tray) that is able to monitor Ryzen 3 temps accurately without triggering boost behaviour? I don't want to have RM open all the time.
CPU-Z

Understood. I also saw one of Wendell's vids on how to apply thermal paste to 3rd gen Ryzen too. It seems like it's a funny chip to cool based on the different layout from anything previously released.
How's the FUMA2 working out for you? I am still looking for the best cooling solution for my ITX build with the C8 (haven't ordered it yet as I was waiting for Bullzoid's review for VRM's). I prefer water cooling though, just for its aesthetics.
My preferred method on these CPU's is to spread the paste with a spatula. Th F2 does an admirable job on the 3900x but I think I'm asking a bit much from it. I'm switching to a custom loop. EKWB was blowing out waterblocks for the Radeon VII and my stock fans coil whine like crazy. Add to that my CPU seems to be a lottery winner and I want to maximize it. I'm new to custom water cooling, and usually prefer air, but i think this build justifies the expense.

I'm using this for inspiration.




The Fuma 2 is quiet, compact for a dual tower, has zero mobo/RAM compatibility issues, cools as good as a Dark Rock Pro 4, and doesn't cost an arm and a leg. I really like that cooler I just think its better suited to a 6 or 8 core. My only gripe is I find it a bit ugly.

I wouldn't worry about the VRM. The 3700x doesn't draw that much current and 1.325 - 1.35 is about the max voltage I'd run on ambient cooling. You can overclock a 3700x without stressing the VRM on most AM4 motherboards. Irrespective of that Asus did a really good job on their x570 VRM's across the board. It's an impact. It will have a good VRM.



Yeah, I've read that a lot and I am just fiddling around just for the fun of it but my X470 AORUS GAMING 7 WIFI isn't helping, it doesn't have the features the C8 has.
TBH, I am happy with the chip's performance. I just want to find the optimal setup, which for me is the best possible performance at acceptable temps. I have done the same on my existing gaming rig, which the ITX build will replace.
My delided 8700K @4.9 (cooled by a Kraken X72) runs idle at 35c and never exceeds 72c under stress testing or 65c when gaming. I spent a good time tweaking everything (including pumps speeds on both the CPU and GPU and fan curves to achieve that). I want a quiet rig as it sits next to my monitor and my Macbook and I mostly work on the Mac. I only use it to game.
I want to feel comfortable enough to justify my switching a set up that runs perfectly well for gaming. If I don't feel that I can achieve this, I'll move to a totally different direction, leaving my 3700X in my work rig with the X470 and will downsize my Intel setup and pop my 8700K in a mini itx setup...
The gaming 7 is a really good motherboard. Probably the only good 400 series board they made. Asrock makes a really good z390 ITX board. That's probably a more sensible approach.

Finally, just wanna say that the highest I can get my B-die kit to pass memtest with Fast settings from Dram Calculator is 3466. Infinity fabric set to half the speed (1733).
Nothing wrong with that. The mobo or I/O die could be hindering it slightly but I think that should run more than adequetely. It probably wouldn't impact your FPS a whole lot (if at all) to go up to 3600-3800 mhz.


Regarding CPU OC, I really don't know how to play around on the Gigabyte board. If I set a fixed voltage of 1.325, what are my next steps? Do I manually set core speed and disable PBO and just slowly push the clocks and test? As I wrote, from everything I have read, only CCX overclocking makes sense on these chips for gaming and optimal temps and I don't want to spend 400$ on a CH8 just to test that.
I only briefly had a 3700x I bought on launch day and returned a week later. I wasn't aware of per CCX oc at the time. I have a bit of doubt that CCX OC will be as effective on these single chiplet SKU's as it is on a 3900x. You should at least be able to see what your CPU is capable of on the x470. Even if playing with RM per CCX OC I'd set a fixed voltage in bios. PBO is useless on the 3000 CPU's IMO.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/properly-stabilize-a-ryzen-cpu-overclock.3503530/

With my 8700K and Maximus Hero, I know that my starting point is 1.3V and I'd play around that to see how high I could get with a small AVX offset after maxing out all the other settings.

Again, thanks for everything man. You have at least made me feel comfortable with the purchase - even if it means that there is no much fun in tinkering any more :)
I did a ton of overclocking on a Max XI hero and a 9900k. You can take load line up to one level below maximum and set the VRM switching freq to max and I bet you could get that sucker to 5 ghz at the same temps.

You're welcome. I'm a huge AM4 dork. I think I've built somewhere around 20 ryzen sytems in the last year. I enjoy discussing them.
 
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I am looking for something that permanently displays the temp in the taskbar, like CoreTemp.
This is how my Argus monitor displays all my temps.

My preferred method on these CPU's is to spread the paste with a spatula. Th F2 does an admirable job on the 3900x but I think I'm asking a bit much from it. I'm switching to a custom loop. EKWB was blowing out waterblocks for the Radeon VII and my stock fans coil whine like crazy. Add to that my CPU seems to be a lottery winner and I want to maximize it. I'm new to custom water cooling, and usually prefer air, but i think this build justifies the expense.
I have a spatula, think it came with my Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut, will try that next time I repaste the Ryzen.
I don't think it will make much of a difference though. I have tried the pea and X method with both the aircoolers I have for my office rig and they both perform similarly.
As for custom loops, I must have added all the suggested components for my setup through the EKW's configurator about 5-10 times at least but at the end, I can't justify the cost and don't want the hassle, so I don't pull the trigger. I already have an X72 to cool my 8700K and my 1080ti is Hybrid so I consider it to be an overkill.

The Fuma 2 is quiet, compact for a dual tower, has zero mobo/RAM compatibility issues, cools as good as a Dark Rock Pro 4, and doesn't cost an arm and a leg. I really like that cooler I just think its better suited to a 6 or 8 core. My only gripe is I find it a bit ugly.
It is goddamnit hahahaha
I much prefer the look of my DRP4 on the X470 board even though it's a pain in the ass to install compared to other solutions.

I wouldn't worry about the VRM. The 3700x doesn't draw that much current and 1.325 - 1.35 is about the max voltage I'd run on ambient cooling. You can overclock a 3700x without stressing the VRM on most AM4 motherboards. Irrespective of that Asus did a really good job on their x570 VRM's across the board. It's an impact. It will have a good VRM.
I wanted to see Bullzoid's review about VRM's cause I plan to switch to a 3950 when it is released (if I go down the X570 MiniITX route). It seems that the CH8 impact is a pretty good board after all, review here if anyone is interested. Not all X570 boards can handle higher core Ryzen chips efficiently.

The gaming 7 is a really good motherboard. Probably the only good 400 series board they made. Asrock makes a really good z390 ITX board. That's probably a more sensible approach.
It's rock-solid compared to my previous board. I was using CH6 previously that really drove me mad, as I had bought it with a 1800X on the day of Ryzen's launch. My history with AMD chips goes way back to the Phenom chips, so I was really looking forward to the release.
I know the AsRock board and yes, it's probably the most sensible approach to downgrade my existing system at home and leave the 3700X at my office but as I said above, it's a sentimental thing with AMD that makes me want to switch my systems...¯\(ツ)

I only briefly had a 3700x I bought on launch day and returned a week later. I wasn't aware of per CCX oc at the time. I have a bit of doubt that CCX OC will be as effective on these single chiplet SKU's as it is on a 3900x. You should at least be able to see what your CPU is capable of on the x470. Even if playing with RM per CCX OC I'd set a fixed voltage in bios. PBO is useless on the 3000 CPU's IMO.
https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/properly-stabilize-a-ryzen-cpu-overclock.3503530/
Will do, thx for the link too!

I did a ton of overclocking on a Max XI hero and a 9900k. You can take load line up to one level below maximum and set the VRM switching freq to max and I bet you could get that sucker to 5 ghz at the same temps.
My board is the Max Hero X, not XI and that is how I am running it :)
Load line 6 and max VRM switching (500). 4,9 is rock-solid @1.3V. If I remember well, I'll have to go much higher for that magic 5Ghz. I was actually running it at 5 last winter but decided that it was not worth the extra fan noise and volts. It gets really hot here in the summer months and we have a long summer.

You're welcome. I'm a huge AM4 dork. I think I've built somewhere around 20 ryzen sytems in the last year. I enjoy discussing them.
Lucky me then! Thanks again!

TBH, the only thing holding me back from going down the Z390 route for the downsizing (with my existing CPU until the 9900K drops in price), is the idea of pairing that sweet 3950X with the CH8 impact into such a small form factor with the best possible cooling. It's just something about the idea of having such a beast in such a small optimized case setup...
 
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rigg42

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I am looking for something that permanently displays the temp in the taskbar, like CoreTemp.
This is how my Argus monitor displays all my temps.
https://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor-pro.html

I have a spatula, think it came with my Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut, will try that next time I repaste the Ryzen.
I don't think it will make much of a difference though. I have tried the pea and X method with both the aircoolers I have for my office rig and they both perform similarly.
As for custom loops, I must have added all the suggested components for my setup through the EKW's configurator about 5-10 times at least but at the end, I can't justify the cost and don't want the hassle, so I don't pull the trigger. I already have an X72 to cool my 8700K and my 1080ti is Hybrid so I consider it to be an overkill.
It probably doesn't make much difference. It just gives me peace of mind to know the paste is spread evenly.

I'm starting with a Swiftech H360 X3. I'm going to sell the block and fans since the pump, rad, and res are more than worth the asking price alone. I figure I can get at least $50 back from that stuff. I plan to use a second rad along with EKWB CPU and GPU blocks. I plan to run a flat black rubber soft tube setup like the previous pic I linked.

It is goddamnit hahahaha
I much prefer the look of my DRP4 on the X470 board even though it's a pain in the ass to install compared to other solutions.
I just sold my DRP4. It didn't fit in my new case. I pulled it in and out of a Meshify C 4 or 5 times. I had it down to a science.

I wanted to see Bullzoid's review about VRM's cause I plan to switch to a 3950 when it is released (if I go down the X570 MiniITX route). It seems that the CH8 impact is a pretty good board after all, review here if anyone is interested. Not all X570 boards can handle higher core Ryzen chips efficiently.

TBH, the only thing holding me back from going down the Z390 route for the downsizing (with my existing CPU until the 9900K drops in price), is the idea of pairing that sweet 3950X with the CH8 impact into such a small form factor with the best possible cooling. It's just something about the idea of having such a beast in such a small optimized case setup...
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1d9_E3h8bLp-TXr-0zTJFqqVxdCR9daIVNyMatydkpFA/htmlview?sle=true#gid=639584818

It has 8 70A power stages. It will laugh at a 3950x. I'd be more worried about how to cool it in an ITX case. The Swiftech coolers might be worth a look.

It's rock-solid compared to my previous board. I was using CH6 previously that really drove me mad, as I had bought it with a 1800X on the day of Ryzen's launch. My history with AMD chips goes way back to the Phenom chips, so I was really looking forward to the release.
I know the AsRock board and yes, it's probably the most sensible approach to downgrade my existing system at home and leave the 3700X at my office but as I said above, it's a sentimental thing with AMD that makes me want to switch my systems...¯\(ツ)
My C6H has been a champ for me. I love that motherboard. Maybe the old bios versions were crap or you got a lemon. I didn't get my 2700x until last November with that board.

My board is the Max Hero X, not XI and that is how I am running it :)
Load line 6 and max VRM switching (500). 4,9 is rock-solid @1.3V. If I remember well, I'll have to go much higher for that magic 5Ghz. I was actually running it at 5 last winter but decided that it was not worth the extra fan noise and volts. It gets really hot here in the summer months and we have a long summer.
;)

Lucky me then! Thanks again!
(y)
 
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Oct 1, 2019
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@rigg42

Thx again for everything man!

I'll wait it out in the hope that AMD will get everything sorted. There are already rumors of an AGESA 1.0.0.4 releasing alongside the 3950X, which I plan on grabing for the new build.

As for reported high temp in Argus Monitor, I have emailed the developer. HWMpro's interface just doesn't do it for me but thx.

Talking about the new build, after our exchange, I decided to pull the trigger on the CH8 Impact for the H210 build and paired it with a new kit of bdie ram from Gskill, 3600 C14 (F4-3600C14D-16GTZN) to max out the infinity fabric on the board with tight timings...

I will move my Intel setup to the office and use the 3700X in the new miniITX build at home until the 3950X is released. Pretty confident that the CH8 will handle it, hoping it has improved boost clocks.

As for cooling, hoping that the Noctua NH-U12S chromax.black will do the job for now with an all around solid Noctua fan setup. Unfortunatelly, the X62 won't fit the case as my 1080ti FTW3 is 300cm long. I'll have to save up and make that move over the holidays. If AMD hasn't come out with something special, i'll go for a 2080ti up to 280cm long (hybrid again). Will post pics when all the parts arrive and I get it sorted.
 
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