Question What games look like 1440P ( 2k ) on 4k TV (monitor) [PC]

Apr 20, 2022
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Hello.
I want to buy this TV - LG 43UP80006LA (4K UltraHD, 3840x2160 , IPS, 60 Hz, Direct LED). I want to work and play with him. But I don’t know how 2560x1440 will look like on a TV in games. Who knows? Tell me please.
Do you have a 4k TV or monitor? And what does it look like for you? I sit close to TV.
 
Apr 20, 2022
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TVs are generally pretty good at upscaling lower resolution content, since almost nothing out there is typically in 4K.

rtings seems to think pretty highly off it for use with a PC.

https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/up8000
Thanks for the answer. This site is not for me. We do not have such TVs. There is no point in watching it. Scaling should be disabled when connected to a PC and in game mode. This is a delay.
 

Eximo

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Thanks for the answer. This site is not for me. We do not have such TVs. There is no point in watching it. Scaling should be disabled when connected to a PC and in game mode. This is a delay.
I'm entirely unsure what you mean. rtings.com review all types of LCD and OLED panels for many purposes, including monitors and with a focus on gaming when that makes sense. You are asking about a specific TV, that is a review for a model in the lineup. It has information about what you are asking.

43UP80006LA, I believe the one they tested was the 65" version. No guarantee that the LCD panel is identical, but the software and general hardware should be.

Scaling absolutely will be in use. LCDs are driven by scalars. If you send a 1440p signal to the TV, it will upscale it to 4K to fit the screen, even in game mode. Game mode disables post processing like color correction and other things, but the image still has to be scaled to fit the TV, unless you are running native resolution.
 
Apr 20, 2022
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I'm entirely unsure what you mean. rtings.com review all types of LCD and OLED panels for many purposes, including monitors and with a focus on gaming when that makes sense. You are asking about a specific TV, that is a review for a model in the lineup. It has information about what you are asking.

43UP80006LA, I believe the one they tested was the 65" version. No guarantee that the LCD panel is identical, but the software and general hardware should be.

Scaling absolutely will be in use. LCDs are driven by scalars. If you send a 1440p signal to the TV, it will upscale it to 4K to fit the screen, even in game mode. Game mode disables post processing like color correction and other things, but the image still has to be scaled to fit the TV, unless you are running native resolution.
Thank you very much for your reply and your time. But I do not understand. Let's be more specific. I watch TVs: LG 43UP80006LA , Samsung UE43AU9000UX, QE43Q60ABUX and even FullHD - LG 43LM5777PLC. LG has an IPS matrix. Samsung has VA (it's worse for games. Loops). I do not know what to do. Because 4k will not pull my video card. But 2560x1440 can. Buy 4k and take a chance. Or take FullHD. I'm not sure the games will be good. More details. I want to fully convert to 1440P. Or should I leave my desktop at 4k and play at 1440p. At what point does the TV scale the image? I was also advised LG 50NANO866PA (but there is a VA matrix, again ...).
 

Eximo

Titan
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If you plan to sit very close to a 43" screen, then you are going to run into issues at 1080p, the pixels are easily visible on a 27". 4K 43" should be okay at around 100 PPI.

27" 1080p = 82 PPI
27" 1440p = 108 PPI
43" 1080p = 51 PPI
43" 4K = 102 PPI
Retina ~= 300 PPI

IPS / PLS - These days, response times are pretty good for monitors and okay for large TVs. Great viewing angles. Generally good color accuracy.
VA - Fast response times, decent viewing angles (Why a lot VA gaming monitors are curved, to get the best viewing angles).
TN - Faster response times, poor colors and viewing angles
QD-LED (Samsung) Your QE43Q60ABUX would qualify. Great colors, poor viewing angles, (apparently motion blur issues according to RTINGS (I have a 32" version of this)
OLED - Fastest response time, great viewing angles, excellent colors, perfect blacks. Extreme cost and durability is still an unknown.

There are more technologies like QD-OLED, and LG's WOLED screens. But they are all still on the pricey side.

If I recall, my main TV is a VA panel from Vizio, I don't find the viewing angles to be all that bad. A little off at the extremes maybe.

Yes, that is how games and displays work. You run your desktop at whatever resolution, and when the game launches (in full screen mode) it will send that resolution to the TV instead. The TV or Monitor's scalar will take the incoming data, make a best fit approximation of the color the pixels should be and use every pixel on the screen. If you run it in a window, then it will take up only that portion the screen as compared to the resolution on the desktop.

I don't know what you mean by fully convert, you can't force a display that has a fixed number of pixels to display anything other then those pixels. Without rescaling, you would end up with a 2560x1440 image with black bars on 4 sides, it would be roughly 66% of the total area. At 43" that would like a 28" display.

Complete detail on how the image gets displayed is best answered by external sources.

Very simply:

Game Engine <-> CPU/Storage/Memory -> Video API instructions -> GPU -> (A WHOLE LOT OF STUFF) -> Signal encoding -> Display Output -> Display Input -> Scaler/Processing -> Signal Decoding ->
LVDS (Low Voltage Differential Signaling (basically using a few wires to connect to all the pixels, kind of an addressing system) to set the color of each pixel. And while that is happening you will also have audio decoding.
 
Reactions: Mikey Serious
Apr 20, 2022
18
0
10
0
If you plan to sit very close to a 43" screen, then you are going to run into issues at 1080p, the pixels are easily visible on a 27". 4K 43" should be okay at around 100 PPI.

27" 1080p = 82 PPI
27" 1440p = 108 PPI
43" 1080p = 51 PPI
43" 4K = 102 PPI
Retina ~= 300 PPI

IPS / PLS - These days, response times are pretty good for monitors and okay for large TVs. Great viewing angles. Generally good color accuracy.
VA - Fast response times, decent viewing angles (Why a lot VA gaming monitors are curved, to get the best viewing angles).
TN - Faster response times, poor colors and viewing angles
QD-LED (Samsung) Your QE43Q60ABUX would qualify. Great colors, poor viewing angles, (apparently motion blur issues according to RTINGS (I have a 32" version of this)
OLED - Fastest response time, great viewing angles, excellent colors, perfect blacks. Extreme cost and durability is still an unknown.

There are more technologies like QD-OLED, and LG's WOLED screens. But they are all still on the pricey side.

If I recall, my main TV is a VA panel from Vizio, I don't find the viewing angles to be all that bad. A little off at the extremes maybe.

Yes, that is how games and displays work. You run your desktop at whatever resolution, and when the game launches (in full screen mode) it will send that resolution to the TV instead. The TV or Monitor's scalar will take the incoming data, make a best fit approximation of the color the pixels should be and use every pixel on the screen. If you run it in a window, then it will take up only that portion the screen as compared to the resolution on the desktop.

I don't know what you mean by fully convert, you can't force a display that has a fixed number of pixels to display anything other then those pixels. Without rescaling, you would end up with a 2560x1440 image with black bars on 4 sides, it would be roughly 66% of the total area. At 43" that would like a 28" display.

Complete detail on how the image gets displayed is best answered by external sources.

Very simply:

Game Engine <-> CPU/Storage/Memory -> Video API instructions -> GPU -> (A WHOLE LOT OF STUFF) -> Signal encoding -> Display Output -> Display Input -> Scaler/Processing -> Signal Decoding ->
LVDS (Low Voltage Differential Signaling (basically using a few wires to connect to all the pixels, kind of an addressing system) to set the color of each pixel. And while that is happening you will also have audio decoding.
How detailed and how much you wrote. I really like. Thank you for your time. For all the time, I realized one thing - TVs are different. They can display the image differently. You need to set up and check. I will go to the store and connect the computer. Q60 has already been noted positively. 1080P, already seen - they look terrible. Soap (everything is blurry). I hope 1440P will look better. because TVs are cheap, and processors are not very good.
 
Jul 21, 2022
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Some TVs will accept "oddball" (for a TV, not a computer monitor) resolutions, but may have side effects such as a reduced maximum refresh rate. Both a previous Sony 4k TV and my Samsung 4k TV would accept and display a 1440p signal, but ONLY at 30hz (regardless of scaling mode and using game mode). 1080p and 4k would both display in 60hz no problem. Might want to check on that as you try out the TV in question.
 
Reactions: Mikey Serious

hang-the-9

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Keep in mind TVs will have more input lag and slower refresh rate than most monitors, even the mainstream non-gaming monitors. Won't matter much for casual non-twitch gaming but if you are thinking about being good at some fast paced games a TV is not a good thing to game on.
 
Reactions: Mikey Serious
Apr 20, 2022
18
0
10
0
Some TVs will accept "oddball" (for a TV, not a computer monitor) resolutions, but may have side effects such as a reduced maximum refresh rate. Both a previous Sony 4k TV and my Samsung 4k TV would accept and display a 1440p signal, but ONLY at 30hz (regardless of scaling mode and using game mode). 1080p and 4k would both display in 60hz no problem. Might want to check on that as you try out the TV in question.
Watched a little. 1080P looks bad. 1440P 30Hz heard (I know), so I also want to check.

Keep in mind TVs will have more input lag and slower refresh rate than most monitors, even the mainstream non-gaming monitors. Won't matter much for casual non-twitch gaming but if you are thinking about being good at some fast paced games a TV is not a good thing to game on.
I know about input lag. To do this, they will connect (the game mode should smooth it out). I play single player games. For shooters, 60Hz is enough for me. Main Diagonal!
 

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