Question What is Non-ECC, Un-buffered Memory?

jimmysmitty

Champion
Moderator
ECC is error correcting RAM. It has an additional bit in order to make sure the data is correct. It typically also means the memory is slower than non ECC RAM.

Buffered RAM also serves a similar purpose in data integrity. Its typically slower.

Both add cost to the memory and are usually used in workstations, servers and HPC applications.

Most consumer RAM is non-ECC and non-buffered. It will usually state if it is or is not on the product description.
 
Feb 20, 2020
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ECC is error correcting RAM. It has an additional bit in order to make sure the data is correct. It typically also means the memory is slower than non ECC RAM.

Buffered RAM also serves a similar purpose in data integrity. Its typically slower.

Both add cost to the memory and are usually used in workstations, servers and HPC applications.

Most consumer RAM is non-ECC and non-buffered. It will usually state if it is or is not on the product description.
Hi, Thankyou for replying. Regarding this product:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07RM39V5F/ref=psdc_172500_t2_B0134EW7G8 what is that PC4-28800 number? Is it the higher, the better?
 

jimmysmitty

Champion
Moderator
Correct the higher the better but its also going to depend on what your CPU and motherboard support. But to break it down:

PC4 - Basically the same as DDR4

28800 - the amount of bits transferred per second

Most CPUs and boards will instead rely on the frequency for support, for example most current Intel CPUs support up to DDR4 2666MHz while most current AMD chips (3rd gen Ryzen) will support up to DDR4 3200.
 
Feb 20, 2020
99
1
35
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Correct the higher the better but its also going to depend on what your CPU and motherboard support. But to break it down:

PC4 - Basically the same as DDR4

28800 - the amount of bits transferred per second

Most CPUs and boards will instead rely on the frequency for support, for example most current Intel CPUs support up to DDR4 2666MHz while most current AMD chips (3rd gen Ryzen) will support up to DDR4 3200.
So the MHz number matters more than the PC4 number?!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Correct the higher the better but its also going to depend on what your CPU and motherboard support. But to break it down:

PC4 - Basically the same as DDR4

28800 - the amount of bits transferred per second

Most CPUs and boards will instead rely on the frequency for support, for example most current Intel CPUs support up to DDR4 2666MHz while most current AMD chips (3rd gen Ryzen) will support up to DDR4 3200.
Natively. Those are the numbers for NATIVE support. When using XMP or manually overclocking, they may support much faster memory kits depending on the specifications of the motherboard and chipset. The CPU is rarely the limiting factor except as it pertains to the native, default memory speed support. I know you know that, but am just clarifying for the sake of others.

Both Intel and AMD platforms currently support much faster memory speeds on the premium chipsets.
 
Feb 20, 2020
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Natively. Those are the numbers for NATIVE support. When using XMP or manually overclocking, they may support much faster memory kits depending on the specifications of the motherboard and chipset. The CPU is rarely the limiting factor except as it pertains to the native, default memory speed support. I know you know that, but am just clarifying for the sake of others.

Both Intel and AMD platforms currently support much faster memory speeds on the premium chipsets.
I am so lost as to what you just said. Please clarify o_O
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Please read ALL of these, and you should then know a lot more than you know now. If you have more questions afterwards, I'm sure one of us will be happy to clarify further. They are pretty easily understood so even a layman shouldn't have trouble picking up on the concepts offered. For the most part, in areas where DDR3 is stated because it is an older article, you can just as well apply the concepts to DDR4 so long as you understand that the two are different.

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr-dram-faq,4154.html

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr-dram-myths,4155.html#p1


And my memory guide, which deals more with configuration and testing.



But to answer your main question about what I posted previously, current Intel platforms generally support memory speeds up to 2666mhz, by default. That means they will automatically detect and run at those speeds. AMD current Gen platforms will generally do so up to 3200mhz by default.

Both platforms however can run faster memory kits if you enable the XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profiles in the BIOS, IF the motherboard is a motherboard based on a chipset that allows support past a certain speed. Not all of them do. Generally, AMD does on all it's boards but some boards will only supports certain speeds. This is generally listed on the motherboard product page specifications.

Intel generally only supports faster than the default speed on it's unlocked chipsets for the most part, which are the Z series motherboards. The rest of them, the business chipsets, the budget chipsets like the B series boards and the H series boards, only support up to whatever the default maximum is for that CPU with no XMP profile capability if it is past that default speed.
 

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