Question What is the normal idle temperature for the 5900x?

Sep 12, 2021
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Hello everyone, I just put together my new system a few weeks ago. I'm using the IC thermal pad this time and it's my first time using a thermal pad, so I'm not sure if I applied it correctly.

I'm using the Fractal Design Define 7 Compact case with a top-mounted 240mm AIO (the top cover is also the opened cover) and I don't overclock at all. But the first reading never dips below 50 degrees, is that normal?
 
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But the first reading never dips below 50 degrees, is that normal?
Like all Ryzen, 5900X boosts aggressively even while at (what you may think of as) idle. It also reports out 'hot spot' temps. So the 'max temps' you're seeing are the instantaneous temps of the hottest spot when it boosts.

The much more relevant temp as far as the actual thermal state of the CPU is the AVERAGE temp...CPU Die(Average) in particular. Especially the AVERAGE column which, in that screen shot, is about 51C so that's it's average across the averaging period. That's about right, although it depends a lot on case cooling and room ambient.

Also interesting is the CPU CCD(Tdie) temp averages: it shows that CCD1 seems get the most work by the scheduler as CCD2's average is about 44C.
 
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Sep 12, 2021
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10
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Like all Ryzen, 5900X boosts aggressively even while at (what you may think of as) idle. It also reports out 'hot spot' temps. So the 'max temps' you're seeing are the instantaneous temps of the hottest spot when it boosts.

The much more relevant temp as far as the actual thermal state of the CPU is the AVERAGE temp...CPU Die(Average) in particular. Especially the AVERAGE column which, in that screen shot, is about 51C so that's it's average across the averaging period. That's about right, although it depends a lot on case cooling and room ambient.

Also interesting is the CPU CCD(Tdie) temp averages: it shows that CCD1 seems get the most work by the scheduler as CCD2's average is about 44C.
Thanks for all the info!

Is it worth it to regular the boost to make it less frequent (like only under really intense tasks)? And which tool do you suggest to do that?


This is my current fan curve, it's just a bit annoying when the fans suddenly become really loud (it is pretty loud once it past 50%) when I'm just using my browser or Discord. And I don't know how to select more temperature readings in iCUE.
 
Thanks for all the info!

Is it worth it to regular the boost to make it less frequent (like only under really intense tasks)? And which tool do you suggest to do that?


This is my current fan curve, it's just a bit annoying when the fans suddenly become really loud (it is pretty loud once it past 50%) when I'm just using my browser or Discord. And I don't know how to select more temperature readings in iCUE.
No, it's not worth it. That boosting behaviour is the secret behind it's remarkable energy efficiency, AMD called it a 'rush to idle'. Get the work done fast and put the core back to a deep sleep state as frequently as it can.

The best curve I've found for my 240mm AIO is a low, barely audible fan speed up to 65-70C then rising to audible but not annoying around 85C. Only when it gets to 90C does it get annoying...by 95 it's close to maximum fans. I'm using a 240mm AIO and take advantage of the enormous capacity of the liquid to absorb heat before letting the fans go crazy to dissipate it faster through the radiator.

But I also set a platform thermal limit at 90C for my 3700X CPU so it can't ever get there.

One other thing is that 5900X CPU's are fully expected to hit up to 90C in routine use, and it's by design. AMD has told us that in various interviews around launch time. I'd expect that with temp spikes. Otherwise, it's very good to see AVERAGE temps lower, in the 70's if possible, since it keeps the CPU boosting at higher clocks. But AVERAGE temps in the 80's would not be unexpected in extreme all-core workloads heavy with AVX instructions like rendering and transcoding.

If you're using PBO look for the platform thermal limit setting and put it in the 85-90C range.
 
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Sep 12, 2021
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No, it's not worth it. That boosting behaviour is the secret behind it's remarkable energy efficiency, AMD called it a 'rush to idle'. Get the work done fast and put the core back to a deep sleep state as frequently as it can.

The best curve I've found for my 240mm AIO is a low, barely audible fan speed up to 65-70C then rising to audible but not annoying around 85C. Only when it gets to 90C does it get annoying...by 95 it's close to maximum fans. I'm using a 240mm AIO and take advantage of the enormous capacity of the liquid to absorb heat before letting the fans go crazy to dissipate it faster through the radiator.

But I also set a platform thermal limit at 90C for my 3700X CPU so it can't ever get there.

One other thing is that 5900X CPU's are fully expected to hit up to 90C in routine use, and it's by design. AMD has told us that in various interviews around launch time. I'd expect that with temp spikes. Otherwise, it's very good to see AVERAGE temps lower, in the 70's if possible, since it keeps the CPU boosting at higher clocks. But AVERAGE temps in the 80's would not be unexpected in extreme all-core workloads heavy with AVX instructions like rendering and transcoding.

If you're using PBO look for the platform thermal limit setting and put it in the 85-90C range.
Oh nice, guess I'll make my fan curve a bit less aggressive too.

May I ask what is PBO and how to set the platform thermal limit? I'm using the MSI MAG X570 TOMAHAWK WIFI.
 
Oh nice, guess I'll make my fan curve a bit less aggressive too.

May I ask what is PBO and how to set the platform thermal limit? I'm using the MSI MAG X570 TOMAHAWK WIFI.
PBO = Performance Boost Overdrive

Normally, the performance boost algorithm in the processor observes certain parameters of current and power draw to avoid overloading motherboard VRM's. You can enable over-rides of those parameters in BIOS and raise power (PPT) as well as instantaneous core current (EDC) and sustained core current (TDC) values. Most boards...and certainly your Tomahawk...are fully capable of that. It's a bit of tweaking and there are guides since you can also use something called Curve Optimizer, that optimizes the boosting algorithm, along with some slight undervolting to keep it boosting longer. There are plenty of guids if you search for it...and a few youtube vids too.

When PBO is enabled in BIOS it opens up a whole bunch of other settings, one of which is platform thermal limit. You can (at least in my BIOS) enable PBO without changing any of the parameters but still set a platform thermal limit.
 
Sep 12, 2021
6
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10
0
PBO = Performance Boost Overdrive

Normally, the performance boost algorithm in the processor observes certain parameters of current and power draw to avoid overloading motherboard VRM's. You can enable over-rides of those parameters in BIOS and raise power (PPT) as well as instantaneous core current (EDC) and sustained core current (TDC) values. Most boards...and certainly your Tomahawk...are fully capable of that. It's a bit of tweaking and there are guides since you can also use something called Curve Optimizer, that optimizes the boosting algorithm, along with some slight undervolting to keep it boosting longer. There are plenty of guids if you search for it...and a few youtube vids too.

When PBO is enabled in BIOS it opens up a whole bunch of other settings, one of which is platform thermal limit. You can (at least in my BIOS) enable PBO without changing any of the parameters but still set a platform thermal limit.
Thank you so much! I'll start tweaking.
 

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