[SOLVED] What will die first after many power surges motherboard or power supply?

Aug 18, 2021
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Im just curious if what will be the one who'll die first. Is it given that if the motherboard dies in an power surges the power supply is damaged too?

Specs:
Gigabyte B450 aorus pro wifi
Seasonic S2iii 550W

+cheap Avr "I dont think it has power surge protection"
 
Aug 18, 2021
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Why not consider a device to help protect against the surges rather than find out?
What is causing this issue?
Yes, I'm planning on buying power surge protection. Before, my motherboard has blown transistor in it so I returned it to repair, so now I'm curious if my PSU is affected too that's why I am asking if is possible that my PSU died first before the motherboard😊
 

HappyTrails

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Oct 30, 2020
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First thought was maybe motherboard but now thinking it could be either. Understand your thoughts my gpu just died and took me buying extra psu and ram to sort it out. Surge protector money well spent :)
 
Aug 18, 2021
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First thought was maybe motherboard but now thinking it could be either. Understand your thoughts my gpu just died and took me buying extra psu and ram to sort it out. Surge protector money well spent :)
The blown transistor is near in the front panel port of the motherboard so I think GPU is safe.Yes I think 50% chance I'll RMA PSU and RAM they have 2years warranty
 

punkncat

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Yes, I'm planning on buying power surge protection. Before, my motherboard has blown transistor in it so I returned it to repair, so now I'm curious if my PSU is affected too that's why I am asking if is possible that my PSU died first before the motherboard😊

I think if it were a merely logical consideration I guess you could say PSU. However, the ability of the PSU to react to a surge in a way that damages it and/or creates an output outside it design parameters don't have to be mutually exclusive.
There are testers for PSU, perhaps even the shop you are already working with could check it for you. Weigh the cost of the connected parts against the replacement of the PSU (assuming everything else has already been tested as fine) and weigh that expense vs. troubleshoot/replace.
 
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OrlyP

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Aug 20, 2020
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Also remember that the surge that affected the PSU>Motherboard>GPU, et al., may also have affected other devices that are plugged into the wall outlet and your PC... like monitor(s), USB devices that has an AC adapter, USB printers, powered speakers, etc.

Electricity will always follow the path of least resistance. That's what these surge suppressors do... give electrical spikes an easy path to ground so your devices downstream are reasonably protected.

Most, if not all AVRs, UPSs, and reputable power strips have this basic protection as long as it is properly Earthed/grounded.
 
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USAFRet

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Most, if not all AVRs, UPSs, and reputable power strips have this basic protection as long as it is properly Earthed/grounded.
And in my personal case last year, totally irrelevant.

2x HDMI ports on a Denon receiver
1x ethernet port on my main PC
1x ethernet port on my printer.

All devices protected by good quality TrippLite and CyberPower UPS.
PC and printer separated by 2x switches and a router.


The wall plug is NOT the only entranceway.
 
Aug 18, 2021
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And in my personal case last year, totally irrelevant.

2x HDMI ports on a Denon receiver
1x ethernet port on my main PC
1x ethernet port on my printer.

All devices protected by good quality TrippLite and CyberPower UPS.
PC and printer separated by 2x switches and a router.


The wall plug is NOT the only entranceway.
Ooh Thank you for the knowledge now I know, Buying an power surge protection extension will solve this problem right?, in that extension I will connect all my components(including other devices like printer)
 
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Most, if not all AVRs, UPSs, and reputable power strips have this basic protection as long as it is properly Earthed/grounded.
Surge protection in most devices is only 'good' for one strike at rated protection level and then it's not reliable at all.

The problem is as always: when the strike occurs you may not know it's lost effectiveness unless there's an indicator to tell you. And even then, who wants to buy new devices every year?
 
Aug 18, 2021
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"Help", not "solve".

Electricity will do what it pleases.
Now that you say that I think I'll buy expensive AVR,
And I think one of the problem is my neighbors who do welding I notice that when they weld our power fluctuate, my cheap avr do tick sound and light bulbs dimming then normal again
 

OrlyP

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The wall plug is NOT the only entranceway.
But almost everything electronic you have at home, they're all more or less, connected to an outlet and in fact, can pass current from one device to another through Ethernet, USB, audio inputs/outputs, etc. So for the most part, the main source of surges will be via the outlets.

To your point, there's also cable TV/internet, external antennas, sat dishes, DSL, everything that is conductive and is exposed, these are also possible ingress points for surge. Most equipment can deal with typically small surges but would likely not survive a direct or nearby lightning strikes, surge suppressor or not. YMWV.
 
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Tac 25

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Jul 25, 2021
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in my case, it's the gpu and avr that got destroyed.

 

USAFRet

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But almost everything electronic you have at home, they're all more or less, connected to an outlet and in fact, can pass current from one device to another through Ethernet, USB, audio inputs/outputs, etc. So for the most part, the main source of surges will be via the outlets.

To your point, there's also cable TV/internet, external antennas, sat dishes, DSL, everything that is conductive and is exposed, these are also possible ingress points for surge. Most equipment can deal with typically small surges but would likely not survive a direct or nearby lightning strikes, surge suppressor or not. YMWV.
And for the Twilight Zone moment from that nearby lightning strike....

I have a battery powered laser level.
It was on a tripod, in the middle of an upstairs bedroom.
Hadn't been used or turned on it a week or two.
I went upstairs later...."whats that red glow?"

it was ON.
Static pulse through the air.

Still works fine.
 

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