Question Why does my computer only boot properly the second time I start it?

Jul 17, 2022
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I'm currently having an annoying situation that did not occured before. I cannot start my computer on the first try. Always on the second boot. If I boot my computer, I have to force close it by holding the power button and re-open it afterward. Doing so will open the computer properly.

What is suposed to happen:
  • The LED and fans opens
  • The Graphic card's fan starts (Fairly loud) then becomes idle
  • The POST beeps once (POST check passes)
  • Screen display the BIOS logo and opens on the OS
What happens now:
  • The LED and fans opens
  • The Graphic card's fan does NOT start at all
  • There's no POST
  • There's nothing on the screen.
This started to happen after I've updated the BIOS to it's latest firmware through USB flashing.

I'm at loss for words and I do not know what to do... should I downgrade the BIOS? Clear CMOS by removing the battery? Can anyone give me some insight?
Specs will be provided on demand.


  • 64GBRam DDR4
  • PRIME x570-PRO
  • NVIDIA RTX 2060 SUPER
  • 700W powersupply
 
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Jul 17, 2022
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did you update the chipset drivers after updating bios?
https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/x570

Is this windows 10? try turning this off and see if it makes any difference - https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4189-turn-off-fast-startup-windows-10-a.html
Oh... I guess I can indeed update my chipset, that's not a bad idea. Unfortunately, I already did disabled the Fast boot as well as the hybernate system because it caused trouble with actual booting and also it took some of my precious C: drive space (I'm the one to blame ofr having such a small place, but I manage.)

Thanks for that.

Did you reset CMOS after the BIOS update?
No, I have not. Should I have? Is it as easy as removing the small battery for five minutes while the computer is unplugged/powered down?
 
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No, I have not. Should I have? Is it as easy as removing the small battery for five minutes while the computer is unplugged/powered down?
Yes you absolutely should any time you update BIOS or make hardware changes like CPU or memory.

You can do it as easily as removing the battery....I also like to short the two reset pins at the same time for an extra measure of confidence. Leave the battery out for several minutes to be sure the charge is completely drained, maybe a half hour or more if not also shorting pins.
 
i thought the BIOS update process generally reset bios to defaults. Normally have to go back in and set up XMP after one.
In OP's situation there's two considerations..

One is it SHOULD reset all CMOS settings locations...but it doesn't always in my experience.

And two...when having problems such as OP is having it's VERY benefitial to simplify things by returning BIOS settings to the most basic. That means losing XMP setting is actually desireable. If his boot problem goes away then go back and enable it; if it then starts back with the no- boot problem you know what to work on.
 
Jul 17, 2022
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i thought the BIOS update process generally reset bios to defaults. Normally have to go back in and set up XMP after one.
As it turns out, after flashing my BIOS, some of my setting has been reset... so maybe that's a thing. I should check. So what is XMP and what kind of settings should I be looking for exactly?

EDIT: It so happens that XMP is an INTEL thing... I'm on AMD, so that's probably not a thing I'm going to fiddle too much with.

I just managed to cmos reset and saddly the problem still occurs. The exact same way even. It opens, but idles, then I have to force close it and re-oppening it reboots it properly.

I'm starting to think that I should either leave this alone... or downgrade the BIOS to what it was.
 
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EDIT: It so happens that XMP is an INTEL thing... I'm on AMD, so that's probably not a thing I'm going to fiddle too much with.
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TRUE XMP is Intel...but AMD boards utilize the XMP settings made available with the DIMM's. That's why you typically buy DIMM's with AMD "certifications" by the manufacturer so they work well.

Also, Asus doesn't call it XMP but DOCP in their BIOS' for AMD boards...not sure about their Intel boards.

How long are you letting it "idle" before force-closing it? It could be it's re-training memory and that can take a minute or so on some boards.

How is your memory installed on the board? Is it in the 2nd and 4rth slots going away from the CPU? and, of course, be sure they're FULLY inserted.

You might try one dimm at a time too, in each slot.
 
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Colif

Win 11 Master
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Jun 12, 2015
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It shouldn't need to retrain the ram on every startup though?

XMP is an Intel tech introduction to automatically set DRAM to intended data rates over and above a base level (for DDR3 it applies to DRAM 1600 and up), DDR4 for DRAM 2400 and up. You enable the feature, it reads the profile off the DRAM sticks and applies it in BIOS.

DOCP (Direct Over Clock Profile), is from ASUS for AMD motherboards and came as the motherboard makers didn't want to pay royalties to Intel to implement XMP on AMD motherboards. It effectively uses the DRAM XMP profile to set up data rates and comparative timings on the AMD motherboards for a variety of data rates.
 
Jul 17, 2022
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TRUE XMP is Intel...but AMD boards utilize the XMP settings made available with the DIMM's. That's why you typically buy DIMM's with AMD "certifications" by the manufacturer so they work well.

Also, Asus doesn't call it XMP but DOCP in their BIOS' for AMD boards...not sure about their Intel boards.

How long are you letting it "idle" before force-closing it? It could be it's re-training memory and that can take a minute or so on some boards.

How is your memory installed on the board? Is it in the 2nd and 4rth slots going away from the CPU? and, of course, be sure they're FULLY inserted.

You might try one dimm at a time too, in each slot.
I don't think I've ever enabled DOCP... I don't think it's necessary either.

I've left it powered in that state for about 5 minutes until I realise nothing was going on at all. No POST, no visuals.

All my slots are filled with RAM. Do you mean that somehow my RAM could have failed?
 
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All my slots are filled with RAM. Do you mean that somehow my RAM could have failed?
Not that it's failed...but that the new BIOS is having problems training it. Especially since you have all four slots filled it's worth a try before reverting.

I'd try just two dimm's at first in 2nd and 4rth slot. If it's still troublesome then go for one dimm at a time in any slot.

Since you're not using DOCP, are you setting any RAM clock speed or multiplier manually? If so...then don't!
 

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