Question why doesnt my graphics card work?

Aug 24, 2019
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I just bought a Aorus AMD Radeon RX580 graphics card and have plugged it in to my computer, I am sure i'm doing this correctly because I have watched several videos and gotten a new power supply that has the correct wattage. when I turn the computer on I see "no signal". I have tried installing new drivers and deleting the old ones and I tried to switch the HDMI for a different cord (DP). the only explanation I can think of is that its a old Lenovo computer and it is not compatible or that since I bought it second hand it could be broken or damaged. does any one know a fix?
 
List the FULL PC specs of that Lenovo computer ? What's the last system BIOS date for this system ? Which PSU did you get ?

Are you booting in Legacy Mode ? Oh btw, how did you install the drivers, when there is no signal ?
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
How could you install new drivers if you have "no display"?

Are you SURE you are plugging the monitor cables into the graphics card, and not the motherboard?

Did you make sure to plug in the PCI/VGA power cables from the power supply to the graphics card?

Have you tried doing a hard reset of the BIOS, WITH the graphics card installed?

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card or are only now installing it, you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.
 
Aug 24, 2019
2
0
10
0
List the FULL PC specs of that Lenovo computer ? What's the last system BIOS date for this system ? Which PSU did you get ?

Are you booting in Legacy Mode ? Oh btw, how did you install the drivers, when there is no signal ?
specs
cpu: ci7-2600 3.4
hdd: 1.5t
ram: 8gb
odd: dvd rw drive
os: Microsoft windows 10 home

the last system bios is lenovo dpkti51 2/25/2011

my old graphics card still worked and thats how i installed the drivers

and it is in legacy mode
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That OEM motherboard just may NOT support that card, due to a lack of BIOS support. I would try the steps I outlined above, and if you still have no luck then it's likely due to lack of BIOS support for a card that is just too new to be utilized in an OEM board that old.

It is rather important to use a high quality power supply as well, not just one that has "enough watts".

"enough watts", pretty much is meaningless, unless the unit is also of at least halfway decent quality. What is the EXACT model of the PSU you purchased?

Did you connect the required six or eight pin connectors to the graphics card from the power supply?

If yes, then try the hard reset as I outlined. For OEM boards, this is often the ONLY way to get them to recognize a newer graphics card.
 

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