[SOLVED] why in the world they don't publish JEDEC table for their XMP RAM sticks

Pextaxmx

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So my Corsair 3200 MHz RAM cannot run at 2666 unless my board is XMP2 capable. (or is there a way? for these "business" desktops from Lenovo?)

Corsair 3200 MHz memory sticks turn out to be binned 2133 memory, and JEDEC only lists up to 2133.

Why don't they disclose this in the product description???????
 
Solution
Oh Now I see that. Thanks..
But I think they could have made it more readily available for the consumers. I think many people make same mistake as me.
Also why a ram that is caplable of 3200-16 cannot run at 3200-19 1.2V? Can't they just modify the table somehow?

They probably assume -- rightly -- that a consumer who actually has the need of the timings of a stick of RAM probably also has the ability to look up the RAM. What's important is that the information is easily available to someone who needs this information, and it is. The only exception is with PSUs, which have the tables printed on them because this is safety equipment. Not knowing whether a stick is CAS 15 or CAS 19 won't fry your fancy new GPU, but a mystery PSU...

Pextaxmx

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Jun 15, 2020
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they do disclose it
for example here
https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Memory/VENGEANCE-LPX/p/CMK16GX4M2B3200C16
3200MHZ CL16 sticks
now click on tech specs u will see SPD speed 2133MHz, speed rating 3200MHz

Oh Now I see that. Thanks..
But I think they could have made it more readily available for the consumers. I think many people make same mistake as me.
Also why a ram that is caplable of 3200-16 cannot run at 3200-19 1.2V? Can't they just modify the table somehow?
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Oh Now I see that. Thanks..
But I think they could have made it more readily available for the consumers. I think many people make same mistake as me.
Also why a ram that is caplable of 3200-16 cannot run at 3200-19 1.2V? Can't they just modify the table somehow?

They probably assume -- rightly -- that a consumer who actually has the need of the timings of a stick of RAM probably also has the ability to look up the RAM. What's important is that the information is easily available to someone who needs this information, and it is. The only exception is with PSUs, which have the tables printed on them because this is safety equipment. Not knowing whether a stick is CAS 15 or CAS 19 won't fry your fancy new GPU, but a mystery PSU might.

I'm not sure why you want higher latency on your RAM. Yeah, RAM can be run at slower rates than it's rated for, but I'm not sure why they need to specifically note that. My office chair has a maximum capacity of 250 pounds; I don't need an additional table to let me know that it can also support 225 or 200 pounds!

As for binning, this is a normal practice in semiconductors. RAM of different speeds isn't just cranked out of different machines with the proper clock speed. Semiconductor fabrication does not actually result in perfect, identical copies. So RAM is tested together and given a rating based on those tests. The same thing goes on with your CPU and GPU; a midrange CPU and GPU are more often than not, simply higher-end chips that didn't meet the standards to be called the higher-end CPU or GPU.
 
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