Question Why is computer network so difficult to understand?

johnnxiv

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Aug 21, 2015
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I struggle to study for the Comptia Network+. Is Comptia Network+ difficult or I'm stupid? Can I get some advice, please? I can't understand how the network works.
 
Lots of basic background stuff you have to learn when you start out. Comptia is very broad but not real in depth so you learn a small amount about a lot of things. You need to know all these different things to understand the more advanced stuff like how the internet really works. It takes time to learn all this basic stuff.

Partially you have to enjoy all the tedious details involved. This is true of most technical jobs, if you don't you are going to hate it and likely not do well.

I find networks very simple but I held CCIE for more than 15yrs before I retired.
 

USAFRet

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Partially you have to enjoy all the tedious details involved. This is true of most technical jobs, if you don't you are going to hate it and likely not do well.
QFT.

If <whatever> does not come easily, or you don't like it....you will not have a good time in a job that involves it.

Not everyone is cut out to be a network engineer. Or programmer. Or car mechanic. Or a writer. Or.....
What DO you have passion for?
 

johnnxiv

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What DO you have passion for?
I have a passion for badminton. I can play all day without getting bored, but I can't make a living with this.
Many pp with degrees in Bio, Chem, and etc end up doing IT because they can land a job. Most of the time it's not about what you love, but what job you can get and earn enough for a living.
 

USAFRet

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I have a passion for badminton. I can play all day without getting bored, but I can't make a living with this.
Many pp with degrees in Bio, Chem, and etc end up doing IT because they can land a job. Most of the time it's not about what you love, but what job you can get and earn enough for a living.
I've worked with people that came to programming from other fields. Astronomy, Chem, etc.
Some good, some absolutely clueless.
The clueless ones did not last long.

For those that can do, fine.

If you can't hack a Network+ cert, there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.
It is simply not your thing.

I'm a programmer.
A few years ago, a team lead proclaimed that she could get anyone even vaguely IT related to be a good programmer.
I and a couple of others said "Sorry, you're wrong".
After a couple of years, she realized her mistake.

I can also build and manage large networks. Even though I've never bothered with Network+
I can also diagnose and fix fighter jets.
I can also do an engine swap in my truck.

I probably cannot be a good nurse.
I probably couldn't be a good salesman.
I know I would make a lousy landscaper.

Not being good at networks is not a failing, it is simply something you may not be good at.
You need to find what YOU are good at, and do that.
 
In some ways this is why people go to college but even then you must have a general idea what you want to do. If you study engineering the first year or so it the same if you are going to build bridges or design software for cars. The basic classes are all the same and let people see what is involved in the different types. Still over 50% either drop out of school or change to other majors. It is also important to realize even people that graduate with a degree will have issues getting a job if they did not get good grades. The guys who are in the top 10% of so will have multiple offers before they graduate the guys who got all B and C will have to work very hard to get even a interview.

It depends on what you plan to do. You can get into networking by getting all the certifications...you likely need some of the advanced ones from juniper or cisco. Most people I know that got jobs in this field also got 4 yr college degrees in something related and got the certifications on top of it. I do not know how much demand there is for IT jobs in general. IT is a jobs that supports a companies computers and other hardware. The IT function has been outsourcing this for years. Most this is in cloud based data centers and the support is all sold to a company as a service. Many companies no longer actually have a IT department....or what they call IT is managing the contracts with the outsourcing company. I somehow managed to survive all the layoff and outsourcing, but about a year after I retired they outsourced everything even stuff like network security.

What is in demand is programmers. They don't care so much for for the guy that supports the tool...ie the machine..they care about the ones that create something company needs. I actually have degrees in programming but didn't like the work so I went to IT but not sure if that is such a good idea now days.

It is much more important to find something that makes you happy rather than chase just money. This is extremely hard for some people. I was lucky I knew as a small child I was going to work with computers...which was well before they were a thing people had in their house.
 

USAFRet

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I was lucky I knew as a small child I was going to work with computers...which was well before they were a thing people had in their house.
I knew the same.
5th grade, we had an assignment to write a letter to a major magazine.
I wrote to US News & World Reports, regarding some computer thing. Mainframes back then. Household PCs were decades away.

And after a long diversion into aircraft maintenance, here i am...;)
 

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