[SOLVED] Will there be any delay for using ethernet port on router set as repeater?

Kahlo kahlow

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Hello,

I have a new ISP now and their router seemed mediocre in the wireless department, so I instead disabled the WiFi radio transmission (from the configuration page) for 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz band and connected an Ethernet cable from my ISP's router/modem to my router's WAN port which I then set up as a repeater (the router I set up as a repeater is a TP-Link AC1750 by the way). Now, my computer has always been using 5Ghz wireless band and I get usually around 4 bars of connection (windows 10) and when I ping test my ISP's router it gets 1-2 ms when I have my door closed (which I usually do). I'd like to point out that my computer's is about 3 inches away from the corner of my room with the antenna's aiming towards the router.

I am currently planning on buying the necessary equipment to install an Ethernet cable in my room to be able to have a faster more stable connection to my pc and I've been wonder if I should directly connect it to the ISP's router/modem LAN or my own router's LAN (TP-Link). The issue I am encountering is that if I buy a 15 meter cable (which is right in my budget), then I'm pretty sure I won't have a long enough cable to make it to my ISP's router but I am sure that it will be enough for it to reach my personal router. I know this is pretty far into the text, but I've been meaning to ask if it's better for me to plug it directly to my ISP's LAN port or my router's LAN port which is set as a repeater via an Ethernet cable.

Thanks for taking the time to read all of this hahahaha
 
So what you'd be doing by connecting to your tp-link is simply connecting to a switch that is connected to your router's switch. This will pretty much be the same speed as connecting directly to the router.

And it's actually simple for you to test and confirm. Connect your computer directly to your isp router lan and ping the gateway--look at the ping times.

Then connect your computer to your tplink and ping the gateway==the ping times will be identical (<1ms).

The lan I'm on spans to the limit of the ethernet standard (300ft), and the cabling was installed in 1995 before cat5e was a standard, before gigabit existed, and before wifi was around. I'm pinging my gateway right now that's 2 floors above me and it's <1ms. :) You don't have to worry about any latency when you're talking in feet. :D
 
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You'll get better results if you connect your "repeater" LAN-to-LAN to the main router, and disable DHCP there.

What you have now, in fact, is "double NAT" - your main router is the "Internet" for devices connected to the "repeater".
 

getochkn

Polypheme
Moderator
Next to no difference. My ISP router comes in with 1Gb speeds of download. It goes to a router since the WIFI is better. That goes to a switch. That goes to the basement connected to another router so I can have my own and better WIFI in the basement. Then it goes from that router to another switch, and finally another router in the other part of the basement.

All of this connected with old cables we either bought 10+ years ago, made ourselves 10+ years ago or bought from a dollar store. The switches are cheapest gigabit ones I could find.

Further end of the line is 960mb/s on speedtest. Right off the first router is maybe 980, 970mbs.
 

Kahlo kahlow

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Jun 4, 2015
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You'll get better results if you connect your "repeater" LAN-to-LAN to the main router, and disable DHCP there.

What you have now, in fact, is "double NAT" - your main router is the "Internet" for devices connected to the "repeater".

My apologies, I know my description is a bit confusing and I forgot to mention that my own router (TP-Link) has a button on the webpage to automaitcally set it as an ACCESS POINT. I know I said repeater earlier but after checking out the page it does indeed specify ACCESS POINT. I will disabled the DHCP right now, but as for NAT it's saying that in Access Point mode it doesn't support QoS or NAT, so that's already taken care of. Also there seem to be some confusion, my router (which is the secondary) is already connected to the LAN port of my main router (ISP's modem/router). Or do you mean that I should not do WAN-to-LAN with WAN being the secondary router and LAN the main router.
 

Kahlo kahlow

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Jun 4, 2015
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Next to no difference. My ISP router comes in with 1Gb speeds of download. It goes to a router since the WIFI is better. That goes to a switch. That goes to the basement connected to another router so I can have my own and better WIFI in the basement. Then it goes from that router to another switch, and finally another router in the other part of the basement.

All of this connected with old cables we either bought 10+ years ago, made ourselves 10+ years ago or bought from a dollar store. The switches are cheapest gigabit ones I could find.

Further end of the line is 960mb/s on speedtest. Right off the first router is maybe 980, 970mbs.
Hey, thanks for telling me about your experience. What do you get in terms of latency though? I am really looking to have almost no delay.
 
So what you'd be doing by connecting to your tp-link is simply connecting to a switch that is connected to your router's switch. This will pretty much be the same speed as connecting directly to the router.

And it's actually simple for you to test and confirm. Connect your computer directly to your isp router lan and ping the gateway--look at the ping times.

Then connect your computer to your tplink and ping the gateway==the ping times will be identical (<1ms).

The lan I'm on spans to the limit of the ethernet standard (300ft), and the cabling was installed in 1995 before cat5e was a standard, before gigabit existed, and before wifi was around. I'm pinging my gateway right now that's 2 floors above me and it's <1ms. :) You don't have to worry about any latency when you're talking in feet. :D
 
Reactions: Kahlo kahlow

Kahlo kahlow

Reputable
Jun 4, 2015
232
0
4,680
0
So what you'd be doing by connecting to your tp-link is simply connecting to a switch that is connected to your router's switch. This will pretty much be the same speed as connecting directly to the router.

And it's actually simple for you to test and confirm. Connect your computer directly to your isp router lan and ping the gateway--look at the ping times.

Then connect your computer to your tplink and ping the gateway==the ping times will be identical (<1ms).

The lan I'm on spans to the limit of the ethernet standard (300ft), and the cabling was installed in 1995 before cat5e was a standard, before gigabit existed, and before wifi was around. I'm pinging my gateway right now that's 2 floors above me and it's <1ms. :) You don't have to worry about any latency when you're talking in feet. :D
Thank you very much for your information. I shall test it right away.
 

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