[SOLVED] Windows 10 starts freezing during normal usage ?

Feb 28, 2021
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CPU: i5-8th gen

RAM: 8GB

HDD: 1TB



While I am browsing or doing any other normal tasks, Windows 10 just freezes for some seconds, also it has became quite laggy as well.

I also reset it some days ago but facing the same issue.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
NO, you probably have a limited supply of sectors it can use and you shouldn't ignore the caution or one day it just won't work at all.

Don't ignore smart warning, they there to save your data.

Count of reallocated sectors. The raw value represents a count of the bad sectors that have been found and remapped.[25] Thus, the higher the attribute value, the more sectors the drive has had to reallocate. This value is primarily used as a metric of the life expectancy of the drive; a drive which has had any reallocations at all is significantly more likely to fail in the immediate months.

emphasis mine


you don't want any, so 9800 is way too many.

reallocated sectors are damaged sectors that have been replaced, it probably started at 0 so your drive may have a very small number left to use to fix itself. the freezing you having now could mean its run out of spare good sectors. I would replace drive sooner rather than later.
 
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Feb 28, 2021
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what motherboard? after reset, did you check you have latest drivers??
what brand hdd? most makers have tests you can run on them to check they okay.
I have an asus vivobook 15 x510un laptop with toshiba hdd and I ran crystal disk info on it and it shows reallocated sector count:9800 with caution.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Reallocated sectors count is the number of sectors that are marked as reallocated by the hard drive upon an error. A growing count is generally considered a bad sign and can result in hard drive failure.

I would backup whats on hdd you want to save and buy a new hdd - i would get a 1tb ssd and never look back. speed difference will be noticeable.
 
Last edited:
Feb 28, 2021
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Reallocated sectors count is the number of sectors that are marked as reallocated by the hard drive upon an error. A growing count is generally considered a bad sign and can result in hard drive failure.

I would backup whats on hdd you want to save and buy a new hdd - i would get a 1tb ssd and never look back. speed difference will be noticeable.
I had noticed that the reallocated sector is stuck on 9800 from some days. So is my hdd safe as the number of reallocated sectors are not increasing?
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
NO, you probably have a limited supply of sectors it can use and you shouldn't ignore the caution or one day it just won't work at all.

Don't ignore smart warning, they there to save your data.

Count of reallocated sectors. The raw value represents a count of the bad sectors that have been found and remapped.[25] Thus, the higher the attribute value, the more sectors the drive has had to reallocate. This value is primarily used as a metric of the life expectancy of the drive; a drive which has had any reallocations at all is significantly more likely to fail in the immediate months.

emphasis mine


you don't want any, so 9800 is way too many.

reallocated sectors are damaged sectors that have been replaced, it probably started at 0 so your drive may have a very small number left to use to fix itself. the freezing you having now could mean its run out of spare good sectors. I would replace drive sooner rather than later.
 
Last edited:
Feb 28, 2021
4
0
10
0
NO, you probably have a limited supply of sectors it can use and you shouldn't ignore the caution or one day it just won't work at all.

Don't ignore smart warning, they there to save your data.


emphasis mine


you don't want any, so 9800 is way too many.

reallocated sectors are damaged sectors that have been replaced, it probably started at 0 so your drive may have a very small number left to use to fix itself. the freezing you having now could mean its run out of spare good sectors. I would replace drive sooner rather than later.
Okay thanks, I will replace by hard disk with a ssd.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, if you have ONE bad sector, you start looking very hard at the device. Regularly. If you see ANY increase in the number of bad sectors, which is normal for most drives but which is NOT normal when numbers have increased, then you replace the drive. It doesn't matter if the number of bad sectors "stops going up" once you've surpassed a few sectors failed or reallocated. It is too probable that you will have a catastrophic failure and loss of data otherwise to be worth the risk. Especially with over 9000 failed sectors.
 

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