News XMG's Neo 15, Neo 17 Packs Tiger Lake-H and Ampere In A Single Package

XMG has outfitted the Intel equivalent with Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut for improved cooling.
I think they mean Conductonaut, as XMG says "liquid metal" cooling.

That aside, I'm starting to wonder if the whole liquid metal TIM is really necessary, or just some "premium" feature to tack on. I have an 2021 ASUS Zephyrus G14 and ASUS claims to be using Conductonaut as the TIM, but it doesn't seem to do a better job at cooling than I'm expecting as it can peak to 80C (in one or two cases, I caught it going up to 90C) if I let it go full ham in a game. Then again, the fan profile probably needs tweaking.
 

jkhoward

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I think they mean Conductonaut, as XMG says "liquid metal" cooling.

That aside, I'm starting to wonder if the whole liquid metal TIM is really necessary, or just some "premium" feature to tack on. I have an 2021 ASUS Zephyrus G14 and ASUS claims to be using Conductonaut as the TIM, but it doesn't seem to do a better job at cooling than I'm expecting as it can peak to 80C (in one or two cases, I caught it going up to 90C) if I let it go full ham in a game. Then again, the fan profile probably needs tweaking.
Those are excellent temps for a laptop. They’d be 90+ all the time without it.
 
Those are excellent temps for a laptop. They’d be 90+ all the time without it.
I would be inclined to believe you, but the 2020 ASUS Zephyrus G14 achieves <80C and it doesn't use a liquid metal TIM. The TDP for those parts is the same (more or less) as the parts in the 2021 model.

Then again, temperature is relative. Maybe the newer laptop can boost harder for longer or the fan curve is less aggressive.
 

XMG Support

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Yes, you need to run the fans at a constant speed in order to really see the difference between different thermal compounds.

When we introduced Liquid Metal TIM in 2020 on Intel Core i7-10875H, we saw a temperature difference of about 9°C when running the CPU with unlocked power limits in all-core benchmarks and 100% fan speed.

The smaller the die and the higher the power envelope of a CPU, the bigger the advantage of LM TIM will be.

Even with 11th Gen on 10nm, Intel's CPUs are able to draw more power than AMD. In our current benchmarks of XMG NEO with unlocked power limits, our i7-11800H can run a sustained (steady state) CPU Package Power of 100W. With some Undervolting, you can get this down to 90W at 80°C thanks to Liquid Metal and the all-core clock of 4.2GHz will be more stable.

Cheers,
Tom
 
Yes, you need to run the fans at a constant speed in order to really see the difference between different thermal compounds.

When we introduced Liquid Metal TIM in 2020 on Intel Core i7-10875H, we saw a temperature difference of about 9°C when running the CPU with unlocked power limits in all-core benchmarks and 100% fan speed.

The smaller the die and the higher the power envelope of a CPU, the bigger the advantage of LM TIM will be.

Even with 11th Gen on 10nm, Intel's CPUs are able to draw more power than AMD. In our current benchmarks of XMG NEO with unlocked power limits, our i7-11800H can run a sustained (steady state) CPU Package Power of 100W. With some Undervolting, you can get this down to 90W at 80°C thanks to Liquid Metal and the all-core clock of 4.2GHz will be more stable.

Cheers,
Tom
Thanks for the info.

I went back to see what ASUS said about their laptop to see if they mentioned anything similar, but I can't find anything. All they say is:
Liquid metal compound from Thermal Grizzly reduces CPU temperatures by up to 10℃ compared to standard thermal paste.
With no other context as to how they got there. So here's me going "okay, it's still sitting at the same temps as everything else I used"
 

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