Question XTU tests for undervolting

csaxon

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Jun 5, 2018
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I have been trying to undervolt my CPU (-0.110mv) to reduce the abnormally high temps my laptop (Inspiron 7567, i7 7700HQ core, 1050ti, 16GB RAM). I have no experience in under/over clocking.

This has decreased the temp, however, I am having some trouble testing for stability and find the different tests on XTU very confusing. I tried to look up the differences on google, but it went a little over my head. If someone could explain it to me that would help.

The XTU stress test has four tests; CPU stress test, CPU stress test with AVX, CPU stress test with AVX2 and memory stress test. I cant figure out the difference between them and I don't even understand what AVX is. If someone could explain what I'm supposed to be using to test?

I ran each of these tests for 10 min with the laptop plugged in and they all passed. I also did the DELL stress test (has much higher temps) which also passed and I thought that meant it was stable. (should I have run the tests for longer?)

Overnight, I left the laptop running, but it was unplugged. when I got up however the laptop has restarted sometime in the night (went back to the log in screen) and reliability monitor said "windows was not properly shutdown" (miscellaneous failure). There was no record of a BSOD though, which is what I though happened if there was not enough voltage. Is it possible that the laptop can handle undervolting when plugged in but not on battery? Or was the restart cause something else?
 
Most applications don't use AVX/AVX2, so you generally test with a non-AVX workload. AVX tests do add quite a bit more heat to the equation, and can be an unrealistic representation of actual real-world performance.

The times you do test with AVX/AVX2 is usually when you're overclocking, so as not to overheat your system. There are settings (AVX offset) that allow you to....reduce the CPU frequency.... when the CPU is performing those tasks.
 

csaxon

Prominent
Jun 5, 2018
49
0
530
0
Most applications don't use AVX/AVX2, so you generally test with a non-AVX workload. AVX tests do add quite a bit more heat to the equation, and can be an unrealistic representation of actual real-world performance.

The times you do test with AVX/AVX2 is usually when you're overclocking, so as not to overheat your system. There are settings (AVX offset) that allow you to....reduce the CPU frequency.... when the CPU is performing those tasks.
What exactly is AVX/AVX2?
 

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