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Question 400w psu, could it hold up?

Jul 14, 2020
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Hi,

so currently, my pc consists of a ryzen 3 2200g apu as my main gpu, I was wondering if I get a gigabyte rx 570 4gb, will my evga 400w psu be able to hold up?

(2200g is clocked at 3700 and gpu at original 1200 I believe)

thanks
 

Ziadul87

Upstanding
Sep 7, 2019
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Hi,

so currently, my pc consists of a ryzen 3 2200g apu as my main gpu, I was wondering if I get a gigabyte rx 570 4gb, will my evga 400w psu be able to hold up?

(2200g is clocked at 3700 and gpu at original 1200 I believe)

thanks
.
Calculate your PC's required wattage here:
If your PSU is rated for 100W or more than your requirement, it will run but I don't think it'll be safe. (Your PSU isn't so dependable. Efficiency under load is probably gonna be around 60% which is too risky)
What are your other specs? Mobo, any additional CPU/casing fans etc?
Better get a Corsair VS450 at least(If budget is tight) or any better 450W+ PSU
 
Last edited:
Jul 14, 2020
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.
Calculate your PC's required wattage here:
If your PSU is rated for 100W or more than your requirement, it will run but I don't think it'll be safe. (Your PSU isn't so dependable. Efficiency under load is probably gonna be around 60% which is too risky)
What are your other specs? Mobo, any additional CPU/casing fans etc?
Better get a Corsair VS450 at least(If budget is tight) or any better 450W+ PSU
My mono is the ASRock b450 pro 4, strath cooler, and the evga 400 like I said before
 
Even at 100% efficiency, your PSU will provide just 360W. But your PSU isn't even 80+ certified (that means efficiency is always lower than 80% and will come down to 65-70% under load. Which is just around 250W (~50W less than your peak usage).
That's not how the efficiency ratings work. They work in a manner that if a system were to require 400w, and the psu is say, 80% efficient, it would draw from the wall 500w. It will still supply 400w.

I was wondering if I get a gigabyte rx 570 4gb, will my evga 400w psu be able to hold up?
Now, evga only has one 400w unit and that's the 400w N1. It states 400w, but when you look at the 12v rail, it states 30 amps. Which translates to only 360w(12v x 30amps=360watts). The N1 is a terrible unit, I believe it was actually banned entirely in the EU for missing protections. It'll sooner blow up your pc then provide adequate power.
*Update: The N1 is an alright budget unit, as pointed out by Phaaze. It has terrible 12v ripple suppression, so I wouldn't use it for any additional components or higher end parts. It still isn't a good choice for an rx570.

Ideally, you want to avoid any group regulated power supplies, these include most budget units. You want to look for something that has dc to dc on the secondary side, llc resonant primary would be ideal, but a good double forward or acrf design would be alright as well.

Where are you located, so I can find a good unit for you?
 
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Reactions: Ziadul87
Jul 14, 2020
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That's not how the efficiency ratings work. They work in a manner that if a system were to require 400w, and the psu is say, 80% efficient, it would draw from the wall 500w. It will still supply 400w.


Now, evga only has one 400w unit and that's the 400w N1. It states 400w, but when you look at the 12v rail, it states 30 amps. Which translates to only 360w(12v x 30amps=360watts). The N1 is a terrible unit, I believe it was actually banned entirely in the EU for missing protections. It'll sooner blow up your pc then provide adequate power.

Ideally, you want to avoid any group regulated power supplies, these include most budget units. You want to look for something that has dc to dc on the secondary side, llc resonant primary would be ideal, but a good double forward or acrf design would be alright as well.

Where are you located, so I can find a good unit for you?
Located in canada
 

King_V

Distinguished
I wouldn't risk it on that model. Jonnyguru's conclusion wasn't exactly a ringing endorsement. He seemed impressed by some of the abuse it held up to, true.

For the long term health of your system, I'd definitely get a better PSU. Check out the first link in my sig.
 

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