[SOLVED] Advice / sanity check on I9-9900 build with Samsung Evo SSD

Mar 1, 2019
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Hi,

I've never build a system from scratch. I added graphics card, usb 3 & upgraded memory in my current HP Elite 7100.
replacing I5-760, 16GB ram, msi gt 970

My main questions are
  • Is this selection making sense ?
  • Are there items I'm overspending on wasting money that could be better spent elsewhere ?
Requirements
  • quiet
  • reliable
  • futureproof, I'd like to be happy with this system for the next 4-5 years
  • more or less at maximum budget already
  • not for gaming but will try some
  • will try overclocking but no extremes
  • considering upgrading ram to 64G in the future (2-3 years)
  • will run Windows 10 professional + HyperV virtualized linux systems
  • maybe dualboot to start Linux without
I'm pretty clueless about which video card I should select, want something decent.
I have a Dell - U2715H 27.0" 2560x1440 60 Hz Monitor monitor, might add second monitor in the future.


build 1 https://be.pcpartpicker.com/user/cverbiest/saved/#view=KJWxGX

considering adding 50 € for
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/N6gzK8/gigabyte-z390-aorus-pro-wifi-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-aorus-pro-wifi
and using G.Skill Trident Z

build 2 https://be.pcpartpicker.com/user/cverbiest/saved/krN3bv
 

TCA_ChinChin

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Feb 15, 2015
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Maybe consider an RX-580 for less money but the same performance? Try to look for some video cards with higher VRAM values considering the resolution of your monitor is 2560x1440p. If you need an Nvidia card for things like CUDA, then try getting a GTX-1060 6gb if you want to be able to game comfortably at your current resolution. I know that in certain cases, Linux driver support for AMD could be better than Nvidia graphics cards so perhaps consider that? An I9 -9900k will deliver better performance in every aspect compared to current AMD processors but costs quite a lot more. Do the workloads you deal with absolutely need that? Depending on what you do, an r7-2700x could be a better performance/$ option. Maybe even consider AMD Threadripper CPUs if your workloads scale really well with core/thread count. For example, a Threadripper 2920X has 12c/24threads for about 100€ more and the platform can support up to 128GB RAM if memory is really important.
 
Just a few thoughts on selection and your intentions.

The future proofing aspect is as dependent on your own usage as it is the actual hardware. More easily seen in games which are starting to see better optimisation for multiple threaded loads.

With respect to the gaming part, what sort of games and what sort of experience would you be looking at? A GTX 1060 is fine for 1080p gaming, though with your monitor you may want to look at a GTX 1070. Unless there are non-gaming workloads which can leverage the power of the graphics card, of course.
 

TCA_ChinChin

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Feb 15, 2015
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Maybe consider an RX-580 for less money but the same performance? Try to look for some video cards with higher VRAM values considering the resolution of your monitor is 2560x1440p. If you need an Nvidia card for things like CUDA, then try getting a GTX-1060 6gb if you want to be able to game comfortably at your current resolution. I know that in certain cases, Linux driver support for AMD could be better than Nvidia graphics cards so perhaps consider that? An I9 -9900k will deliver better performance in every aspect compared to current AMD processors but costs quite a lot more. Do the workloads you deal with absolutely need that? Depending on what you do, an r7-2700x could be a better performance/$ option. Maybe even consider AMD Threadripper CPUs if your workloads scale really well with core/thread count. For example, a Threadripper 2920X has 12c/24threads for about 100€ more and the platform can support up to 128GB RAM if memory is really important.
 
Mar 1, 2019
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Thank you for your replies, I'll look into the graphics card selection

Just a few thoughts on selection and your intentions.

The future proofing aspect is as dependent on your own usage as it is the actual hardware. More easily seen in games which are starting to see better optimisation for multiple threaded loads.

With respect to the gaming part, what sort of games and what sort of experience would you be looking at? A GTX 1060 is fine for 1080p gaming, though with your monitor you may want to look at a GTX 1070. Unless there are non-gaming workloads which can leverage the power of the graphics card, of course.
My main objective is software development, running build jobs on windows & linux (VM). A lot of the stuff I do there is not optimized for multi threads

Maybe consider an RX-580 for less money but the same performance? Try to look for some video cards with higher VRAM values considering the resolution of your monitor is 2560x1440p. If you need an Nvidia card for things like CUDA, then try getting a GTX-1060 6gb if you want to be able to game comfortably at your current resolution. I know that in certain cases, Linux driver support for AMD could be better than Nvidia graphics cards so perhaps consider that? An I9 -9900k will deliver better performance in every aspect compared to current AMD processors but costs quite a lot more. Do the workloads you deal with absolutely need that? Depending on what you do, an r7-2700x could be a better performance/$ option. Maybe even consider AMD Threadripper CPUs if your workloads scale really well with core/thread count. For example, a Threadripper 2920X has 12c/24threads for about 100€ more and the platform can support up to 128GB RAM if memory is really important.
My initial CPU selection was a Core i7-8700K, 3,7 GHZ @ € 389,- but due to popularity its price went up to €449, it was only €50 extra for a i7-9700K and another €100 extra for the Core I9. That is how I got to this selection,, hoping that the 150€ extra will keep me happy for longer than a i7-8700K would
 
From what I am aware, though not through actual knowledge, Linux can leverage many cores/threads when compiling code (tend to hear this from Level 1 Techs), though I suppose it depends on the nature of the code.

Certainly from a Windows perspective it sounds more limited (especially with the Windows kernel issue which seems to impede the Threadripper 2000 series CPUs' performance, though there is a workaround). But certainly the Intel CPUs have better IPC for workloads which are dependent on IPC and clockspeeds, and the i9-9900k makes sense if affordable.
 
Mar 1, 2019
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I changed the graphics card to Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card
This is what my list looks now. I will look at some case alternatives before I order

PCPartPicker part list: https://be.pcpartpicker.com/list/6PbkBb
Price breakdown by merchant: https://be.pcpartpicker.com/list/6PbkBb/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor (€583.95 @ Bytes At Work)
CPU Cooler: Corsair - H150i PRO 47.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler (€169.00 @ Paradigit)
Motherboard: Gigabyte - Z390 AORUS PRO WIFI ATX LGA1151 Motherboard (€227.95 @ Bytes At Work)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive (€239.00 @ Paradigit)
Video Card: MSI - Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card (€251.95 @ Bytes At Work)
Case: SHARKOON - TG5 ATX Mid Tower Case
Power Supply: Corsair - 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply (€169.00 @ Paradigit)
Monitor: Dell - U2715H 27.0" 2560x1440 60 Hz Monitor : already have this
 
U2715H? Only a 60Hz monitor? No plan to upgrade it?
If you plan to game only on 60Hz, you do not need 9900k, choose 2600x for less than half of the price .
You are wasting money big time on the 9900k if you just use 60hz monitor a.k.a. 60 FPS gaming.
 
For software build jobs without a good multithreading support.
9900k can help but going single core/thread for those kind of jobs is no longer a good option.
You might need also to consider using other tools, if there are any.
 

TCA_ChinChin

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The current list seems pretty solid for what you want IMO. Couple of things just to point out. As others have said, the i9-9900k isn't really necessary for gaming at the resolution and frame rate you are targeting. However, that said, the single-threaded horsepower of the i9-9900k is significantly ahead of an AMD R7-2700x, which could be a lot cheaper alternative. If you don't really need multi-threaded performance that badly and want to save money, then going for said AMD processors, or even a less costly Intel one would give you basically 100% of the gaming performance, but perhaps slightly less single-threaded performance in your work applications. At the end of the day, it's your choice and I wish you the best with your build!
 

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