[SOLVED] Bios Update When Upgrading CPU

Errol100

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Jun 28, 2015
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I am going to upgrade my Ryzen 3 1200 to a Ryzen 5 2600, I have an MSI B350m pro-vdh motherboard. According to the MSI website the BIOS I have installed is compatible with the 2600 - my question is whether it is worth updating the BIOS anyway? Or just keep it as is.

The BIOS version I have now was released May 2018, since then there have been 5 (non-beta) updates, latest in February 2019.
 
I am going to upgrade my Ryzen 3 1200 to a Ryzen 5 2600, I have an MSI B350m pro-vdh motherboard. According to the MSI website the BIOS I have installed is compatible with the 2600 - my question is whether it is worth updating the BIOS anyway? Or just keep it as is.

The BIOS version I have now was released May 2018, since then there have been 5 (non-beta) updates, latest in February 2019.
I agree that BIOS updates have brought significant improvements with Ryzen systems...especially for memory compatibility and performance. The clue is in the AGESA code progression in the notes: your current BIOS is on the orginal, stable, AGESA release for Pinnacle Ridge CPU's. There are two more AGESA updates that significantly improved memory compatibility and generally improved performance of the platform. It's well worth updating to them to be assured it will work right with your memory while also getting good performance from your system.

The old "if it ain't broke don't fix it" rule is a good one but in your case it's a good idea to update. Just use the BIOS updater, not the in-Windows one, be patient to let it finish and you'll be fine. And don't do it if you have any doubt about your power...like if there are thunderstorms in the area. Also use the USB ports on the rear I/O panel to avoid any possible wiring problems with your case's USB ports.

I'd use the last non-BETA release, ver. 7A38vAH which has an AGESA with the most stable memory compatibility for Pinnacle Ridge and Summit Ridge CPU's. The BETA is intended to support 3rd gen CPU's and not really gonna help your 2600.
 
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Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
I would suggest updating the BIOS since there are gradual improvements in the AGESA code and system stability which'll help when you want to tinker with ram timings and frequency. Often times, BIOS updates address not just performance issues but security and stability issues as well, which is why you're advised to be on the latest BIOS version.

Since you say you're on May 2018, 7A38vAB , you have 6BIOS updates pending until you reach the BETA BIOS. I'd personally avoid the Beta BIOS. The Beta version would be necessary if you were on the 3000 series processors.
 
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Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
My view is that, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".

Look through the BIOS version details. What's been changed? Almost every update has an AGESA code change, but the performance improvements are not going to be earth-shattering. Compatibility? If your system is up and running as it should be, what need is there for a "more compatible" system? Everything you have is already compatible! Security/Stability updates? Those would be listed in the BIOS version details. If there are no security patches listed and your system is already stable, why update?

Looking through the available updates, I (personally) see no reason to update the BIOS.

-Wolf sends
 
Reactions: Errol100
I am going to upgrade my Ryzen 3 1200 to a Ryzen 5 2600, I have an MSI B350m pro-vdh motherboard. According to the MSI website the BIOS I have installed is compatible with the 2600 - my question is whether it is worth updating the BIOS anyway? Or just keep it as is.

The BIOS version I have now was released May 2018, since then there have been 5 (non-beta) updates, latest in February 2019.
I agree that BIOS updates have brought significant improvements with Ryzen systems...especially for memory compatibility and performance. The clue is in the AGESA code progression in the notes: your current BIOS is on the orginal, stable, AGESA release for Pinnacle Ridge CPU's. There are two more AGESA updates that significantly improved memory compatibility and generally improved performance of the platform. It's well worth updating to them to be assured it will work right with your memory while also getting good performance from your system.

The old "if it ain't broke don't fix it" rule is a good one but in your case it's a good idea to update. Just use the BIOS updater, not the in-Windows one, be patient to let it finish and you'll be fine. And don't do it if you have any doubt about your power...like if there are thunderstorms in the area. Also use the USB ports on the rear I/O panel to avoid any possible wiring problems with your case's USB ports.

I'd use the last non-BETA release, ver. 7A38vAH which has an AGESA with the most stable memory compatibility for Pinnacle Ridge and Summit Ridge CPU's. The BETA is intended to support 3rd gen CPU's and not really gonna help your 2600.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Errol100

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