Question Blue screen after installing 64GB more RAM

mujmuj

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This is the computer spec I had.
  • Crucial P5 2TB PCIe M.2
  • GIGABYTE Radeon RX 6500 XT GAMING OC 4G(GV-R65XTGAMING OC-4GD)
  • ASRock Z690 Phantom Gaming 4/D5 INTEL
  • TWO Crucial DDR5 4800_32G
  • 12th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i9-12900KF
  • Cougar Gex 1050 power supply
  • Cooler Master MasterBox CM694 Case
I just added two "TWO Crucial DDR5 4800_32G" so that the total RAM space is 128GB.

Then as soon as I boot up my PC, it shows the blue screen saying "Your device ran into a problem" and then another blue screen saying "automatic repair" has failed.

This is the same problem I wrote about last time here.

Last time I mixed the two different kinds of RAMs into one motherboard, and @Nephern suggested that isn't good. I took away the two new RAMs, and still had the same problem. After I pasted more thermal paste onto the CPU, and boot up again, the problem was gone, and I have been using this computer with no problem for two weeks ever since.

But this time, I plugged in the same version/brand of RAM, so that now my motherboard has four 32GB RAM (128GB in total). I also added additional thermal paste so that it doesn't cause the same problem again.

But now the same problem.

What could be the problem this time? My motherboard just can't handle 128GB RAM of whatever type? Where can I check that?

Or, this computer simply just can't handle any change in RAM slots?
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

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"My motherboard just can't handle 128GB RAM of whatever type? Where can I check that? "

Motherboard's User Guide/Manual.

Should list all supported RAM and RAM configurations.

Will also likely refer you to the manufacturer's website for more up to date information via the QVL (Qualified Vendors List).

Check Forums and FAQs as well.

And keep in mind that some motherboard's require that the first physically installed RAM be placed in a specific RAM slot.

Another way is to visit RAM manufacturer websites. Many provide RAM information specific any given system. May or may not be accurate.

Details matter. Look for a consensus regarding supported RAM modules and the corresponding configuration options.
 

mujmuj

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And now the computer power doesn't even work. The computer just doesn't turn on.

Honestly I pasted too much thermal paste. I can see some of the thermal paste slightly spilled over outside the CPU header. Could it be the reason why the computer couldn't handle it in the first place?
 

Tennis987

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And now the computer power doesn't even work. The computer just doesn't turn on.

Honestly I pasted too much thermal paste. I can see some of the thermal paste slightly spilled over outside the CPU header. Could it be the reason why the computer couldn't handle it in the first place?
Pretty rare but it's possible. Just make sure all the wires are connected to where they are supposed to be. It should still boot unless there is a non connected cable or PSU/motherboard issue.
Blind shot, but If it spilled over the side and shorted some CPU pins. I'd suggest taking the CPU out of the socket and checking it out for damage or if there's anything in there or bent pins somehow. Maybe a CPU reseat will turn it on again.
 
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Here? https://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/Z690 Phantom Gaming 4D5/index.asp#Memory

It lists all the RAM that is compatible, which includes my RAM. But where should I look to find the maximum RAM it allows?
From the Asrock spec sheet for that motherboard:

Memory

  • Dual Channel DDR5 Memory Technology
  • 4 x DDR5 DIMM Slots
  • Supports DDR5 non-ECC, un-buffered memory up to 5800+(OC)*
  • Max. capacity of system memory: 128GB
  • Supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) 3.0
*Supports DDR5 4400 (1DPC) / 3600 (2DPC) natively.
 
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mujmuj

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From the Asrock spec sheet for that motherboard:

Memory

  • Dual Channel DDR5 Memory Technology
  • 4 x DDR5 DIMM Slots
  • Supports DDR5 non-ECC, un-buffered memory up to 5800+(OC)*
  • Max. capacity of system memory: 128GB
  • Supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) 3.0
*Supports DDR5 4400 (1DPC) / 3600 (2DPC) natively.
Thanks. But where can I read that it supports DDR5 4400 or 3600 natively? All I can read is that it supports 5800. Maybe with more advanced knowledge I can read it out, but I can't find numbers like "4400" or "3600" on this page. I am talking about this page https://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/Z690 Phantom Gaming 4D5/index.asp#Memory

Maybe you found another webpage for the spec?


And on that page it says
"Please DO NOT combine DIMMs for multiple kits. Combining multiple kits, even if they are rated for the same speed, may result in system stability issues. "

But I don't understand what "combine DIMMs for multiple kits" mean.

For example, if I buy four of this same DDR5 RAM(Crucial RAM 32GB DDR5 4800MHz CL40 Desktop Memory CT32G48C40U5), and put all of them into this motherboard, is this combining DIMMs for multiple kits?
 
where can I read that it supports DDR5 4400 or 3600 natively? All I can read is that it supports 5800.



And on that page it says
"Please DO NOT combine DIMMs for multiple kits. Combining multiple kits, even if they are rated for the same speed, may result in system stability issues. "

But I don't understand what "combine DIMMs for multiple kits" mean.

For example, if I buy four of this same DDR5 RAM(Crucial RAM 32GB DDR5 4800MHz CL40 Desktop Memory CT32G48C40U5), and put all of them into this motherboard, is this combining DIMMs for multiple kits?
I'm not sure I have ever seen DDR5 3600 or 4400. Seems to begin at around 4800 and go up from there as far as I can tell.

The link in your post is for a single stick. Not a kit. Combining 2 or more of those single sticks is NOT a kit.

A single stick of RAM is NOT a kit. Therefore 4 single sticks are not a kit and may pose problems if put on a motherboard. Or may not pose problems. It's a risk. Take the risk if you want to. I would not.

"Kits" are 2 or more sticks sold in a single package for a single price. Full stop.

2 kits of 2 sticks each combine to make 4 sticks, but that is not a kit. It is two kits combined. That is NOT the same as 4 sticks sold in a single package for a single price. You can try to combine 2 "identical" kits if you want to take the risk. I would not.

The nearest you can get to certainty is to buy one (1) kit for one price.
 
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mujmuj

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I'm not sure I have ever seen DDR5 3600 or 4400. Seems to begin at around 4800 and go up from there as far as I can tell.

The link in your post is for a single stick. Not a kit. Combining 2 or more of those single sticks is NOT a kit.

A single stick of RAM is NOT a kit. Therefore 4 single sticks are not a kit and may pose problems if put on a motherboard. Or may not pose problems. It's a risk. Take the risk if you want to. I would not.

"Kits" are 2 or more sticks sold in a single package for a single price. Full stop.

2 kits of 2 sticks each combine to make 4 sticks, but that is not a kit. It is two kits combined. That is NOT the same as 4 sticks sold in a single package for a single price. You can try to combine 2 "identical" kits if you want to take the risk. I would not.

The nearest you can get to certainty is to buy one (1) kit for one price.
Thank you. Finally this seems to be the most plausible reason why I got bluescreen when two kits of memory were placed onto this motherboard.

I first had to understand what "Please DO NOT combine DIMMs for multiple kits. Combining multiple kits, even if they are rated for the same speed, may result in system stability issues. " really meant. But I didn't.

Is this a general rule not to install multiple kits of RAM on one motherboard? Then it's nearly impossible to reach 128GB of RAM. Or is this rule just specific to this ASRock motherboard? If it's a general rule for any motherboard, how can I build a computer with 128GB RAM?
 
Last edited:

DSzymborski

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Thank you. Finally this seems to be the most plausible reason why I got bluescreen when two kits of memory were placed onto this motherboard.

I first had to understand what "Please DO NOT combine DIMMs for multiple kits. Combining multiple kits, even if they are rated for the same speed, may result in system stability issues. " really meant. But I didn't.

Is this a general rule not to install multiple kits of RAM on one motherboard? Then it's nearly impossible to reach 128GB of RAM. Or is this rule just specific to this ASRock motherboard?
It's for all motherboards.

The reason? RAM doesn't really have individual models in the sense of different models of, say, cars. When Toyota makes a car, they make something specific, like a Camry or a Corolla or a RAV-4.

But RAM isn't like that. RAM is binned. RAM is manufactured and then tested and given a rating based on how it performs. A stick of DDR-3200 and a stick of DDR-2400 are basically the same thing, it's just that the DDR-2400 stick being sold, when tested, was more defective than the DDR-3200 stick. Because of the microscopic levels of fabrication, we do not have anywhere near the level of technology to make semiconductors truly identical.

Those Toyota Camrys, while not identical on the microscopic level, don't function at the microscopic level, so parts are interchangeable. But a 5 nm transistor is basically like 10 atoms.

It's the same with CPUs. For example, there aren't really a bunch of Zen 3 chips (ignoring the 5800x3D). They're all basically 5950X CPUs. It's just the 5900X CPUs didn't perform well enough to be sold as 5950X CPUs, the 5800X CPUs didn't qualify as 5900X CPUs and so on. Companies then fuse out the defective areas of CPUs.

Now, it's more complex than this, for instance companies intentionally fusing out things with a high success rate of fabrication for issues of market segmentation; if AMD could make 5950Xs perfectly, they wouldn't have a product to sell less expensively as a 5600X.

So when you have two sticks together, it doesn't mean that they are identical, because they can't be. It's just that they were tested together and worked together. With individual sticks, it's a crapshoot. While they will usually work, they frequently won't.
 
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how can I build a computer with 128GB RAM?
For DDR 5, you could:

try to find a kit of 4 sticks; 32 gb per stick; total 128; i have no idea if there is such a thing. May be such a kit in the future.

Or use a kit of 2 sticks; 64 gb per stick; as far as I know, there is no such thing today. May be such a kit in the future.

Or accept less than 128. You may find that untenable.

Or use a DDR 4 motherboard. You may find it easier to find a high capacity kit of DDR 4 than DDR 5.
 
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mujmuj

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It's for all motherboards.

The reason? RAM doesn't really have individual models in the sense of different models of, say, cars. When Toyota makes a car, they make something specific, like a Camry or a Corolla or a RAV-4.

But RAM isn't like that. RAM is binned. RAM is manufactured and then tested and given a rating based on how it performs. A stick of DDR-3200 and a stick of DDR-2400 are basically the same thing, it's just that the DDR-2400 stick being sold, when tested, was more defective than the DDR-3200 stick. Because of the microscopic levels of fabrication, we do not have anywhere near the level of technology to make semiconductors truly identical.

Those Toyota Camrys, while not identical on the microscopic level, don't function at the microscopic level, so parts are interchangeable. But a 5 nm transistor is basically like 10 atoms.

It's the same with CPUs. For example, there aren't really a bunch of Zen 3 chips (ignoring the 5800x3D). They're all basically 5950X CPUs. It's just the 5900X CPUs didn't perform well enough to be sold as 5950X CPUs, the 5800X CPUs didn't qualify as 5900X CPUs and so on. Companies then fuse out the defective areas of CPUs.

Now, it's more complex than this, for instance companies intentionally fusing out things with a high success rate of fabrication for issues of market segmentation; if AMD could make 5950Xs perfectly, they wouldn't have a product to sell less expensively as a 5600X.

So when you have two sticks together, it doesn't mean that they are identical, because they can't be. It's just that they were tested together and worked together. With individual sticks, it's a crapshoot. While they will usually work, they frequently won't.
Thank you for this wonderful explanation. Then my confusion is, why do modern motherboards have four memory slots when most RAM kits include only two sticks at most? Users won't be able to use the four slots anyways unless they take the risk of breaking computer stability. Is there any way to build a computer with 128GB RAM by using all four slots? (I realized Lafong posted an answer to this question while I was writing this post).
 
Last edited:

DSzymborski

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Thank you for this wonderful explanation. Then my confusion is, why do modern motherboards have four memory slots when most RAM kits include only two sticks at most? Users won't be able to use the four slots anyways unless they take the risk of breaking computer stability. Is there any way to build a computer with 128GB RAM by using all four slots?
There are lots of four-stick RAM kits. PC Part Picker alone lists about 30 4x32 DDR4 kits in stock, nearly a hundred 4x16 kits, and hundreds of 4x8 kits. Most people don't use them. My Mazda can accelerate up to the 130 mph limiter. I haven't gone anywhere near 130 mph!

Mixing kits tends to work, especially for those who have experience manually configuring their motherboards. Hell, my main rig has two 2x8 RAM kits and they're both overclocked and stable for nearly two years. And if it hadn't, that's what returns are for!
 
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Then my confusion is, why do modern motherboards have four memory slots when most RAM kits include only two sticks at most?
Users won't be able to use the four slots anyways unless they take the risk of breaking computer stability.
Probably need to manually adjust DRAM settings in BIOS, for it to work.
Can you show screenshots from CPU-Z - memory and spd sections?
(upload to imgur.com and post link)
 
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mujmuj

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Probably need to manually adjust DRAM settings in BIOS, for it to work.
Can you show screenshots from CPU-Z - memory and spd sections?
(upload to imgur.com and post link)
Thank you so much. CPU-Z didn't work. It was stuck at "monitoring" stage (I found this reddit page which reports the same issue, although mine is not Ryzen Master)

Instead I used HWiNFO. Here is the screenshot.
 

mujmuj

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There are lots of four-stick RAM kits. PC Part Picker alone lists about 30 4x32 DDR4 kits in stock, nearly a hundred 4x16 kits, and hundreds of 4x8 kits. Most people don't use them. My Mazda can accelerate up to the 130 mph limiter. I haven't gone anywhere near 130 mph!

Mixing kits tends to work, especially for those who have experience manually configuring their motherboards. Hell, my main rig has two 2x8 RAM kits and they're both overclocked and stable for nearly two years. And if it hadn't, that's what returns are for!
Probably need to manually adjust DRAM settings in BIOS, for it to work.
Can you show screenshots from CPU-Z - memory and spd sections?
(upload to imgur.com and post link)
If I adjust BIOS to add 64GB more RAM onto the same motherboard, does the performance of any of the RAM suffer as a result?
 

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