[SOLVED] Blue Screens, RAM and Chrome

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the Tom's Hardware community: where nearly two million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.
Oct 10, 2019
19
0
10
0
The worst thing I feared has come to pass and once more I was faced with another Blue Screen, it's been almost 2 weeks since the last and it gave me yet another Memory_Management description. This time it happened while I was playing a game instead of just while using chrome and it's hard to send a crash dump since it doesn't even generate one as it just freezes and I have to manually reboot the computer.

Update: While the Memory Management blue screen only happened once yesterday, today as I booted the computer, right when I was writing my password I got yet another blue screen called Video Scheduler Internal Error, once again it froze not allowing windows to save a crash dump. I also have a PCI Device that lacks drivers in the Device Manager but I have no idea what it might be.

Update 2: Apparently when checking WhoCrashed it said the computer did a Blue Screen right when I shut it off which is weird since I didn't see it happening, the following was DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL.

Sidenote: After half a month of these issues happening I'm starting to really think the RAM sticks my friend gave me are faulty or at least one of them is, he said the only reason he didn't use them was because his slots were damaged and were causing BSODs but I'm starting to think that's not the case. Memtest didn't accuse them of having issues the first time around I ran it but looking at the patterns of these issues such as sometimes I go 2 days without anything happening but every day it's like rolling the dice so I'm starting to think that every time I start the computer there might be chances of the RAM going corrupt and causing whatever it's causing to me. If that's the case hopefully a new pair (that I'll get from having sent my original faulty RAM sticks) will fix these issues.
 
Last edited:

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
I would get PC looked at in a store, as they should have spare ram sticks they know are good, that they can throw in to test. If they still get BSOD, they should have the spares to work out what is problem.

Memory Management & IRQ errors can be hardware or software. Since we never got any dumps, it has been difficult to tell which. I had hoped axe would reply in last few days.

Odd thing is normally RAM related errors are a lot more random, not just sticking to Memory Management & IRQ, they will throw errors at you that are rarely seen and blame the wrong drivers. Its one reason I didn't just blame ram although my 1st post did say to use memtest... as not all ram errors act the same.
 
Oct 10, 2019
19
0
10
0
I will be getting a stick of 16gb to test today and see if it eliminates the problems, if it does well we can be safe to say it was the previous memory sticks.
As for your theory, you'd mostly be right as before these two I had lent to me I had the faulty ones and those were giving me the various different BSODs like 10 minutes upon booting the computer. Anyways I'll get back to you with the results.
 

axe0axe0

Respectable
Jun 5, 2017
848
20
2,165
95
While going over the logs, I noticed entries related to piracy.
I would like to ask you to get rid of everything piracy related on your system, if this includes Windows then I would suggest getting a proper license key for Windows and removal of the crack or reinstalling Windows using a proper license key. I usually recommend the latter in case some malware came along.

Why is pirated software a problem?
  • It is unknown what could've come with it, such programs often have a way of letting other software come into your system and who knows what they'll do.
  • Since it is unknown what could've come with such programs it is unknown what the behavior of your system will be and any potential solutions may, as a result, backfire and make your system's stability worse.
  • It is against forum rules
Please remove everything piracy related on your system so we can start troubleshooting your system.
Please consider this as a warning, I may refrain from providing support if I see piracy-related entries in new logs.
 
Oct 10, 2019
19
0
10
0
I'm running the new 16gb RAM stick now, let's see how it performs though I can't be for sure since I've gone for 2-3 days without problems on the previous RAM.
As for piracy, it's a long story but I'll resume it by saying that my previous computer came with Win10 as it was a pre built computer, they never gave me a DVD to reinstall windows but I was able to use the Recovery Drive to format it once I had gotten a new build (everything except the SSD and HDD was changed), the reason it probably says it's pirated is because for some reason when I reformatted it using the recovery it began telling me it was not a legitimate Windows but that eventually went away so I assumed it recognized itself. The one who changed my PC said the motherboard did that to windows, I still even have the old windows sticker.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
You might need to reinstall win 10 to get rid of any traces of piracy. It could also fix the BSOD problem and also fix the systems complete lack of dump files as well.

download the Windows 10 media creation tool and use it to make a win 10 installer on USB

copy anything off the boot drive you want to save
disconnect any other hdd before installing windows
follow this guide: https://forums.tomshardware.com/faq/how-to-do-a-clean-installation-of-windows-10.3170366/

when you get to end of install and if the PC shows as being inactivated, have a look at the next link, and see if you can contact MIcrosoft and give them the old WIn 7 licence and explain you swapped motherboards, and they might move licence over.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change

When you get a new Motherboard and CPU, Microsoft see that as a new PC so that is why it deactivated in the past. There are ways around it but you clearly didn't know.
 
Oct 10, 2019
19
0
10
0
Indeed, I had no idea it would make make the license invalid, to be honest the technician who swapped the motherboards should have told and instead he just swapped them and acted like the windows was pirated then told me it might have been the fact I had a new motherboard. Either way, that's done. I have a lot of things saved so I'm going to take a bit to reinstall windows and I won't be here monday.

On a side note before we close this chapter I'd like to confirm something: the new RAM stick I got of 16gb has a frequency of 2800 but in the Task Manager it only shows as "Speed 2133 Mhz" is this related to the motherboard pumping it down?

Thanks again for all the help, Colif.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
According topage vi of this - https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1151/PRIME_H370-PLUS/E13754_PRIME_H370-PLUS_UM_WEB.pdf - the fastest your motherboard can run ram is 2666

4 x DIMM, max 64gb, DDR4 2666/2400/2133MHZ non ECC unbuffered
Dual channel memory
Supports XMP
max memory frequencies vary based on CPU
  • Intel 8th gen 6 core or higher can run ram at 2666
  • Intel 8th gen 4 core will run 2400MHZ or higher memory modules, at 2400
So depending what you have, your max is either 2400 or 2666, in XMP
 
Oct 10, 2019
19
0
10
0
Ah I see, I had a feeling it was a Bios stuff which is something I'm a bit afraid of touching. Same with overclocking any kind of hardware.

The reason I asked this is because ever since I changed to this RAM (since yesterday) I noticed a small dump in performance when playing games, which is weird considering this RAM is better than the last ones but perhaps it needs to be run at 2666 to be good? My CPU is an i7 8700K.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
I am not certain the ram speed will make a great difference -

Faster RAM will give your PC better performance in certain specific benchmarks, but in terms of actual benefit to most users, having more RAM available is almost always better than having faster RAM. So if you’re on the fence about purchasing 8GB of DDR4 RAM with a speed rating of 3200 or 16GB of DDR4 RAM with a rating of 2400, go with the second option every time. It also means that overclocking RAM in the system BIOS is rarely worth the effort.

This is especially true for gaming. If your computer has a discrete graphics card, then games will rely primarily on the video card’s own memory (labelled as “GDDR,” specifically designed for visual applications) to handle these functions. Note: since your graphic’s card’s memory is mounted directly onto the graphics card PCB, it can’t be upgraded by the end user. Again, choosing a card with more memory is generally better than one with faster memory.
https://www.howtogeek.com/303455/how-does-ram-speed-and-timing-affect-my-pcs-performance/
 
Oct 10, 2019
19
0
10
0
I had a feeling that was the case but just wondered since this is the first time I have anything higher than 2400, well it's like he said "rarely worth the effort" and right now I don't feel like stacking problems with the ones I already have. I'm still testing to see if the issue was the RAM, I'll just stay put and not overclock anything. Thanks again for the info, I'll keep you posted on updates but once again if the problem was indeed the previous RAM I'll just close the thread with best answer.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS