Question BSOD Stop Code: NTFS FILE SYSTEM

dleavitt

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Jul 25, 2011
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Background: New build with two SSDs, each with a separate install of Windows 10. One drive is my personal drive, the other is for work. The idea was that the work drive would be the property of my employer, but allow me to work from home when needed through a VPN connection.

I assembled the computer three weeks ago with only the personal drive installed. POST was fine, installed Windows and other applications without issue. This install of Windows continues to run perfectly as far as I can tell (boots without issue).

Last weekend I installed the work drive and removed my personal drive (so not only drive attached to the system is the work drive). Installed Windows, rebooted a couple times to make sure there weren't any issues, and reinstalled the personal drive. Confirmed that I was able to select either drive to boot from via the UEFI boot menu. Buttoned everything up and connected to my network and ran Windows Update on the work drive to get everything up to date. Also installed some apps that I had access to (Office, TeamViewer, Adobe DC). So far everything is running smoothly, rebooted a couple times during this process.

IT contractor continues installing necessary applications, remoting in to the computer via TeamViewer. One of them requires a restart. Computer is set to boot to personal drive by default, so the restart does not allow contractor to finish work. I get home and reboot to the work drive, and get this BSOD with this stop code: NTFS FILE SYSTEM. It attempts to restart, some repair operations are run, but error still occurs. However, I am able to access the advanced startup tools.

There are options to repair the install, and of course I could just do a clean install again, but I'd rather avoid having to disassemble my computer again if I can. If I choose one of the restore or repair options, do I risk my other Windows install? Any other suggestions?
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
SFC/scannow won't fix this as its not its job.

reset this PC would only touch C drive on the hdd it is run on. It never touches any other partitions so it would be a safe way to get PC back to working order without removing your normal C

If you plan on doing the IT contractor thing again, you would need to have the work drive set as 1st in boot order or this happen again :)
 

dleavitt

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Jul 25, 2011
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SFC/scannow won't fix this as its not its job.

reset this PC would only touch C drive on the hdd it is run on. It never touches any other partitions so it would be a safe way to get PC back to working order without removing your normal C

If you plan on doing the IT contractor thing again, you would need to have the work drive set as 1st in boot order or this happen again :)
That's great to hear! I think I'll give that a go this afternoon then, hopefully that does the trick. If it works I'll change to boot order temporarily until it's all set up.
 

dleavitt

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Jul 25, 2011
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Well, I done goofed.

Tried resetting, attempted a restore, no dice. Accepted the fact that I need to reinstall Windows. Started the process, and remembered that I didn’t remove the M.2 drive that had my personal install. However, I noticed that the Windows installer allowed me to select which drive to install on, and figured I’d give it a try without. That was mistake #1. Now the work drive was fine, but I my personal drive was no longer bootable.

Well shoot, guess I need to reinstall Windows on that drive now. This time I disconnect the work drive (it’s a 2.5” drive, so much easier to get to), and get to installing. Long story short, now I can’t boot to the work drive!

Guess I need to remove the M.2 drive, and reinstall Windows on the work drive. Again. Third times a charm?

I’m frustrated enough at this point that I’m not going to do anything more tonight, so if you have any other suggestions I’d be glad to hear them.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
i think mistake 1 caused the other 2.

Win 10 really isn't designed for 2 installs of itself on same PC. So when you reinstalled win 10 on the PC with both drives installed, its seen the EFI on the 2nd drive (the personal drive) and used it as the location of the EFI for the work drive and wrote over what was there before.

it was just trying to be helpful. If the other os was win 7, it would have worked as it would have added itself to boot info and kept the 7 info intect. It doesn't do that with win 10 unfortunately.

So when you try to boot the personal, it won't work as its got the boot info for the work drive on it - so to fix the personal you reinstalled win 10 on it and wiped the boot info for work PC.

So part 3 is remove the personal drive and install on work drive.

You really need to be there when they update the PC or just have the work drive as only one in PC when they do it, set as default boot...

Sorry I slow to answer
 
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