Question Can a CPU with integrated Intel and dedicated Nvidea video work together at the same time ?

Jul 22, 2020
2
0
10
0
I am building a CPU with a i5-9400 and a GTX 1650 and i wanna know if its possible to keep running all the time thru the integrated card and when i wanna do some Autocad designs or gaming can auto switch to the Nvidea automatically.
I have VGA connector for the integrated and a HDMI for the dedicated (not sure hows its gonna work) or should i run everything directly thru the dedicated card plugin in the main display cable to it?
Sorry for my grammar, but please i need some advice how to make this CPU work as i desire
 
Last edited:
By default any program is going to use the GPU that is connected to the display that is the main display,so you can just switch the display settings to VGA for integrated or to HDMI for autocad/gaming.


in addition windows 10 has a new feature, in graphics settings you can tie a program to use a specific GPU, even if you are connected to the integrated you can tell the program to use the nvidia card.

You are not going to gain anything by doing it either way,having the integrated attached is just a nice easy way to have some display if something crashes on the nvidia card so you can still have access to task manager or what have you.
 
Reactions: rodriggio
Jul 22, 2020
2
0
10
0
in addition windows 10 has a new feature, in graphics settings you can tie a program to use a specific GPU, even if you are connected to the integrated you can tell the program to use the nvidia card.
do you mind explain a little bit more that? because i am going to use this setup like i was using it on my laptop with a dedicate video card. i dont wanna overwhelm my dedicated graphics for that i have the integrated one
 

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
do you mind explain a little bit more that? because i am going to use this setup like i was using it on my laptop with a dedicate video card. i dont wanna overwhelm my dedicated graphics for that i have the integrated one
Honestly, this doesn't make much sense, so you may have a misconception about how this works. Nothing an integrated GPU can do will remotely overwhelm the dedicated GPU. Except for hooking up a second monitor -- and really, a second monitor is no problem -- there's nearly no purpose to doing it this way and you'll generally struggle getting it to function in this manner.
 
do you mind explain a little bit more that? because i am going to use this setup like i was using it on my laptop with a dedicate video card. i dont wanna overwhelm my dedicated graphics for that i have the integrated one
Just type graphics into the search bar and go to the graphics settings,there you can browse for the app of your choice and assign it an GPU.

But you don't need this for desktop,on a laptop you do this because it heats up too much if you use the dedicated too much but a desktop has so much more cooling that you can use the dedicated all the time without problems.
 
I am building a CPU with a i5-9400 and a GTX 1650 and i wanna know if its possible to keep running all the time thru the integrated card and when i wanna do some Autocad designs or gaming can auto switch to the Nvidea automatically.
Note - integrated GPU gets disabled automatically, when you connect discrete graphics card.
To enable integrated, you'd have to change settings in BIOS.

Enabling iGPU, will just reserve certain amount of ram for iGPU operations and make available ram for user processes that much less.

Use discrete GPU only, keep iGPU disabled (unless you need to connect more monitors, than your discrete graphics card can support).
 
Aug 10, 2020
67
3
35
0
The plug'n'play standard addresses this. The motherboard scans for video bios on the p'n'p bus. If video bios is found on add in card then it becomes primary then MB video bios is disabled. The secondary video must be compatible with first cards video bios for that to work. Had an Asrock MB where onboard graphics created a "synthetic" video card slot that disabled on board video for a video card. I've had MBs with limited pci-e lanes that get shared with integrated video enabled.
 
Enabling iGPU, will just reserve certain amount of ram for iGPU operations and make available ram for user processes that much less.

Use discrete GPU only, keep iGPU disabled (unless you need to connect more monitors, than your discrete graphics card can support).
That's for AMD igpus,at least in the past I don't know if they changed that since.
For intel the amount you have to reserve is like 24mb or something and the rest is dynamic so it only uses up your system ram if you actually use the iGPU.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS