Can a separate home internet be created buying a modem

Nov 14, 2018
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So at home we have a virgin media router which is connected to CCTV cameras and my PC is using wireless which is very unstable I want to make my PC have a solid wired connection without bringing the router from downstairs and all of the camera equipment up with it.

My idea is that could any 300mbps modem be put in my room connected with a coaxial cable then a Ethernet cable from the modem to my PC would this give me a solid wired connection or is that not how it works as all my times living we have been with a ISP so I wouldn’t know how to go around this.

Any help would be much appreciated
 

grimfox

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Jun 2, 2009
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I doubt you could have multiple modems on the same account. You'd likely have to pay for a second subscription to use a second modem. The only way to be sure would be to call up virgin media and see if that is something that they allow.

Your other options would be to buy a powerline network adapter to plug one in near the existing modem and another near your PC. I've had pretty good luck with that in my small house, YMMV. It easily gets 250Mbps. You could also look at getting a different wireless network adapter, or different antennas depending on your setup. Or you can go with Scout_03's plan and run a ethernet cable from your Virgin router to your PC. That would be the most foolproof method, although it's also the most labor intensive.
 
Nov 14, 2018
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The powerline way seems good however would the PC run fine without lag for gaming etc while the CCTV cameras are also hooked up to it As I'm currently experiencing high ping that jumps from 30-999 which is unplayable so would the Powerline option fix this give me stable connection and good download etc?

Update - just watched a video review and someone said they were on WiFi but had ping drops so decided to try power-line but this didn't resolve the issue that much so decided to run a LAN cable through the wall however I'm not sure if i can do that option
 

grimfox

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Powerline should be pretty stable. Your speeds and throughput are entirely dependent on your homes electrical wiring. Newer houses tend to work better than older houses and if you are passing through different breakers in the electrical panel you'll see performance drops. It's difficult to know how it will work before you try them. Keep the packaging, if they don't work well enough pack them back up and return them.

I have 75Mbps internet I get 75Mbps through the power line adapters. (it's actually modem -> router ->power line adapter -> switch) I don't have any issues streaming or playing games. But I'm not watching my ping or netgraph while I play either. I am using TPlink's AV2000, which are great because they have 2 ports on the bottom that act like a mini switch. I can't guarantee it'll work for you in your house but it might be "good enough"

If you are fine with running a cable along the floor or walls then that's probably the cheapest and most reliable solution. The cameras shouldn't be pushing data anywhere near the saturation point. I found a website that does calculation, according to that site (link below) the total bandwidth for 4 10 megapixel security cameras with a 20fps frame rate would only be 115Mbps. That's less than 1/8th the total bandwidth of a gigabit switch. That's about as bad a worse case as you could get for 4 cameras. In all likelihood you've got cameras that are not pushing that much data. There should be plenty of bandwidth left on your Virgin media router for your PC to operate without issue over Ethernet.

http://stardot.com/bandwidth-and-storage-calculator
 
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I think this is the route i will take if possible

Cheers!
 
Nov 14, 2018
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If possible we are going to do a LAN cable through the floor and walls I wanted to find an easier solution but i think for best results we will try this and see how it goes

Appreciate all the comments

Cheers!

 
U never disclose ur Internet bandwidth.

For my own piece of mind, I would drag the PC and plug it next to the modem and simulate what I want to do, before going through the trouble of laying a cable. Mind you, a cable is always a good thing, but if you have low bandwidth to begin with, other issues, may as well find out now.
 

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