[SOLVED] Can peripherals connected to the computer that are not active consume the battery?

Oct 15, 2022
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Hello, I know that if I use e.g. an external keyboard with the laptop, it will eat the battery.
But what about this situation: I have an external device connected (perhaps the keyboard), but I'm not using it. Is it eating battery? If so, is this the case for all devices? Let's say I have headphones connected to my laptop, but I'm not using them (they don't play any sound). Or I have an external monitor connected via HDMI, but it is turned off. Is it eating the laptop battery? Or a mouse that I'm not currently using,...

thank you for answer
 
Thank you for answer. Is there an overview table available somewhere about how much electricity each peripheral consumes? Or is it so little that it is unnecessary to deal with it?
Each peripheral has the power rating printed at its back or on the retail package.

For example:

My USB keyboard is rated 30mA.

My USB mouse with RGB lighting is rated appr. 100mA (much lower for non-RGB mouse).

Those ratings mean highest amount of power the devices would consume during normal operation.
 
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As long as the ports (USB, HDMI...) are powered, all connected devices will consume some amount of energy depending on their states (active, standby...)

Only when your laptop entered sleep mode the power will be cut off completely.
 
Oct 15, 2022
13
0
10
0
As long as the ports (USB, HDMI...) are powered, all connected devices will consume some amount of energy depending on their states (active, standby...)

Only when your laptop entered sleep mode the power will be cut off completely.
Thank you for answer. Is there an overview table available somewhere about how much electricity each peripheral consumes? Or is it so little that it is unnecessary to deal with it?
 
Thank you for answer. Is there an overview table available somewhere about how much electricity each peripheral consumes? Or is it so little that it is unnecessary to deal with it?
Each peripheral has the power rating printed at its back or on the retail package.

For example:

My USB keyboard is rated 30mA.

My USB mouse with RGB lighting is rated appr. 100mA (much lower for non-RGB mouse).

Those ratings mean highest amount of power the devices would consume during normal operation.
 
Reactions: Matiseli

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