Connecting two video recorders to the same video feed?

Brian

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Are there any disadvantages such as sync problem or poor picture
quality when connecting the same video source (eg a sky decoder) to
the video input of two video recorders at the same time?

I have used a switching selector to switch the video signal to the
recording video recorder in the past. The problem is that unless I
remember to switxh the selector to the recording video then the video
does not get recorded. To overcome this problem I'm thinking of having
the video signal connected to both recorders at all times.

Regards Brian
 
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On Fri, 28 May 2004 00:09:37 +1200, Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:

>Are there any disadvantages such as sync problem or poor picture
>quality when connecting the same video source (eg a sky decoder) to
>the video input of two video recorders at the same time?
>
>I have used a switching selector to switch the video signal to the
>recording video recorder in the past. The problem is that unless I
>remember to switxh the selector to the recording video then the video
>does not get recorded. To overcome this problem I'm thinking of having
>the video signal connected to both recorders at all times.
>
>Regards Brian

You could make a direct observation to see what the difference is. I
find when I do that, the brightness goes down a bit. You could also
buy an A/V distribution amplifier, like Radio ShackCatalog # 15-1172.

http://www.radioshack.com/product.asp?catalog%5Fname=CTLG&category%5Fname=CTLG%5F003%5F010%5F001%5F000&product%5Fid=15%2D1172

Rich M.

Rich M.
 
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"Richard M." wrote ...
> You could make a direct observation to see what the difference is. I
> find when I do that, the brightness goes down a bit.

You can't "Y-connect" video signals with most consumer equipment.
It causes a double-termination which is why the "brightness goes down
a bit" What you don't see is that the chroma and sync also "go down a
bit". None of this is a good thing.

> You could also
> buy an A/V distribution amplifier, like Radio ShackCatalog # 15-1172.

That would be the proper way of feeding a single video signal to
multiple devices.
 

Tony

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"Richard Crowley" <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in message
news:10bd1n19p8rq9a1@corp.supernews.com...
> "Richard M." wrote ...
> > You could make a direct observation to see what the difference is. I
> > find when I do that, the brightness goes down a bit.
>
> You can't "Y-connect" video signals with most consumer equipment.
> It causes a double-termination which is why the "brightness goes down
> a bit" What you don't see is that the chroma and sync also "go down a
> bit". None of this is a good thing.

Of course, it depends on the intended final use of the tapes (I didn't see
the OP, so I don't konw the intentions). It may be that the lower quality is
acceptable for the intended use. However, if it isn't:

> > You could also
> > buy an A/V distribution amplifier, like Radio ShackCatalog # 15-1172.
>
> That would be the proper way of feeding a single video signal to
> multiple devices.

It's a cost/benefit thing. If I'm recording a TV show for me and a friend to
watch later, separately, it's not worth the money to get the distribution
amp. If I'm dubbing a client's tapes, then it would be.
 

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