[SOLVED] CPU Cooler fan.

Oct 5, 2020
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I have a Cooler Master Hyper 212 black with one stock fan. Not sure of the quality of that fan.
I have considered swapping that one with either 2 Noctua NF-A12x25 PWM or the cheaper Noctua NF-P12 redux-1700 PWM. The A12s are praised when I google, but so are the NF-P12..

Also does anyone know if using the damping corners (extra) for the P12s are important?
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Yes, those two Noctua models are comparable, and both are very likely to last a long time. The P12 model is a slightly older design and hence a little less expensive, but it actually has slightly higher performance in terms of max air flow and backpressure specs. It does lack the built-on vibration-damping corner pads that the A12 model has. Those are not of huge importance, although I see that the original fan with that cooler had them. Their function is to reduce transmission of vibration into the finned heatsink, not for avoiding mechanical problems, but simply to reduce generation of noise. Since the Noctua fans all are relatively quiet, I doubt the noise differnece between the fans is a significant issue.

Noctua ships their fans with little items called Low Noise Adapters that can be inserted into the fans' power connector. When you use them with a mobo-based automatic speed control system such as the CPU_FAN header, do NOT use those items. They really are needed only if you have no other means of speed control because the fans are powered from the PSU with a fixed 12 VDC supply.

You should be aware of something. The speed of the CPU cooling fans, and thus of the internal CPU temperature, is controlled automatically by the CPU_FAN header. This control is aimed to keep the internal temperature at a target value suited to that CPU, and the fans are just manipulated to reach that target. By adding more cooling capacity, you will NOT change the actual operating temperature inside the CPU for most low-to-moderate workloads. What you will do, though, is allow those fans to run a little slower for the same temps, AND add reserve capcity. That is, at very high workloads, the fans will speed up appropriately and ensure that the CPU is well cooled even at max workload.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
The 212 stock fan is 'fine'. I wouldn't spend the money on replacing it, personally.
Even replacing with 2x Noctua fans, you're looking at probably ~$40?

At that point, you'd be better replacing your 212 with an all-round 'better' cooler (better performance, quieter etc, whichever route you want to go).
 
Oct 5, 2020
11
1
15
0
The 212 stock fan is 'fine'. I wouldn't spend the money on replacing it, personally.
Even replacing with 2x Noctua fans, you're looking at probably ~$40?

At that point, you'd be better replacing your 212 with an all-round 'better' cooler (better performance, quieter etc, whichever route you want to go).
Yeah about that so I guess you are right. But adding a second fan would be an option? I guess that would increase the performance?
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
But adding a second fan would be an option? I guess that would increase the performance?
Is that not what you were asking?

I have considered swapping that one with either 2 Noctua NF-A12x25 PWM or the cheaper Noctua NF-P12 redux-1700 PWM. The A12s are praised when I google, but so are the NF-P12..
It would likely increase performance, sure... but not to the point of it being economical.
You might drop 1-2'C... and be a bit quieter if using two of the same Noctua's (and louder if pairing the 212 stock with A.N.Other due to potential turbulence).... but it's going to cost you ~$40 easy?

Also does anyone know if using the damping corners (extra) for the P12s are important?
Not for functionality, but for noise dampening, yes.
 
Oct 5, 2020
11
1
15
0
Is that not what you were asking?



It would likely increase performance, sure... but not to the point of it being economical.
You might drop 1-2'C... and be a bit quieter if using two of the same Noctua's (and louder if pairing the 212 stock with A.N.Other due to potential turbulence).... but it's going to cost you ~$40 easy?



Not for functionality, but for noise dampening, yes.
The PC is dead silent now. Without the damping. But I guess that can change as the fans are worn ?

I have a 120mm fan laying around so I consider just put that on.. the 212. But I have been worried that since it means it will be mounted very close to the exhaust fans in the cabinet (Corsair Carbide 275Q) I have 2 in the back of the cabinet.. that it would work against to air stream...?
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Yes, those two Noctua models are comparable, and both are very likely to last a long time. The P12 model is a slightly older design and hence a little less expensive, but it actually has slightly higher performance in terms of max air flow and backpressure specs. It does lack the built-on vibration-damping corner pads that the A12 model has. Those are not of huge importance, although I see that the original fan with that cooler had them. Their function is to reduce transmission of vibration into the finned heatsink, not for avoiding mechanical problems, but simply to reduce generation of noise. Since the Noctua fans all are relatively quiet, I doubt the noise differnece between the fans is a significant issue.

Noctua ships their fans with little items called Low Noise Adapters that can be inserted into the fans' power connector. When you use them with a mobo-based automatic speed control system such as the CPU_FAN header, do NOT use those items. They really are needed only if you have no other means of speed control because the fans are powered from the PSU with a fixed 12 VDC supply.

You should be aware of something. The speed of the CPU cooling fans, and thus of the internal CPU temperature, is controlled automatically by the CPU_FAN header. This control is aimed to keep the internal temperature at a target value suited to that CPU, and the fans are just manipulated to reach that target. By adding more cooling capacity, you will NOT change the actual operating temperature inside the CPU for most low-to-moderate workloads. What you will do, though, is allow those fans to run a little slower for the same temps, AND add reserve capcity. That is, at very high workloads, the fans will speed up appropriately and ensure that the CPU is well cooled even at max workload.
 
Oct 5, 2020
11
1
15
0
Is that not what you were asking?



It would likely increase performance, sure... but not to the point of it being economical.
You might drop 1-2'C... and be a bit quieter if using two of the same Noctua's (and louder if pairing the 212 stock with A.N.Other due to potential turbulence).... but it's going to cost you ~$40 easy?



Not for functionality, but for noise dampening, yes.
Yes, those two Noctua models are comparable, and both are very likely to last a long time. The P12 model is a slightly older design and hence a little less expensive, but it actually has slightly higher performance in terms of max air flow and backpressure specs. It does lack the built-on vibration-damping corner pads that the A12 model has. Those are not of huge importance, although I see that the original fan with that cooler had them. Their function is to reduce transmission of vibration into the finned heatsink, not for avoiding mechanical problems, but simply to reduce generation of noise. Since the Noctua fans all are relatively quiet, I doubt the noise differnece between the fans is a significant issue.

Noctua ships their fans with little items called Low Noise Adapters that can be inserted into the fans' power connector. When you use them with a mobo-based automatic speed control system such as the CPU_FAN header, do NOT use those items. They really are needed only if you have no other means of speed control because the fans are powered from the PSU with a fixed 12 VDC supply.

You should be aware of something. The speed of the CPU cooling fans, and thus of the internal CPU temperature, is controlled automatically by the CPU_FAN header. This control is aimed to keep the internal temperature at a target value suited to that CPU, and the fans are just manipulated to reach that target. By adding more cooling capacity, you will NOT change the actual operating temperature inside the CPU for most low-to-moderate workloads. What you will do, though, is allow those fans to run a little slower for the same temps, AND add reserve capcity. That is, at very high workloads, the fans will speed up appropriately and ensure that the CPU is well cooled even at max workload.
thanks a lot for the reply. I know what to do now :)
 

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