cpu overclocking temp results , normal?

packersfan036

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quick question, I have my ryzen 5 1600 overclocked to 3.9 ghz 1.375 volts. im using a corsair h60 (2017 model), my room temp is 74F, under a stress load my temp maxed out at 60C, and my idle tems are around 29C to 34C, is this good? or should I upgrade my aio cooler to a corsair h100i pro rgb?
 

packersfan036

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that's what I thought with a h60. so do you think its worth upgrading to the corsair h100i pro rgb? or is it a waste of money?
 
Pumps do fail and a second AIO cooler wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing. Keep the H60 for a rainy day. If you don't have the extra money I would stay with the H60 because if it isn't broke I'm not supposed to fix it. Would the extra cooling that the H100i offers justify the money spent? Not in my opinion.

What exactly is a stress load? There are many of them out there such as AIDA 64 and Prime95 version 26.6(only) with small FFT's.

What are you using to monitor your temps? 60c with the CPU at 100% load for an extended period of time doesn't seem right.
 

packersfan036

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I already have the h100i pro as well. so would you stick with the h60 for now? or would the h100i pro be a good improvement over the h60?
 

packersfan036

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oh ya, and the stress loads are aida 64 and using sony vegas pro for a long period of time.
 

Darkbreeze

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Aida64 is not a very good metric for thermal testing. MANY experts agree that it doesn't get anywhere near TDP and it's a fact that it doesn't present a steady state load, which is what you WANT for testing thermal compliance.

The commonly accepted mantra is that Aida64 is only good if you feel the need to have a false sense of security. I would recommend that you download Prime95 version 26.6, which is NOT an AVX version of Prime, and run the small FFT test for 15 minutes. If your thermals remain below 80°C during that time then you are thermally compliant, period. For ALL platforms.

Prime95 v26.6 is THE primarily accepted way to do the majority of baseline thermal compliance testing running the Small FFT option.

Prime95 Version 26.6 download


Further, you can find extensive information regarding the Intel CPU architectures and specifications at the following link which is a somewhat definitive guide on that subject. The information below is taken directly from conversations with Computronix who is also the author of the Intel temperature guide, found here:

The Intel temperature guide

For AMD systems, specifically Zen/Ryzen, this should offer similar albeit not nearly as detailed information on that architecture.

Ryzen overclocking guide


AMD FX and A series overclocking guide



This is probably about the most referred to overclocking guide around, and it's principles can be applied to a variety of generations and platforms.

The Ultimate Overclocking Guide



This pretty well sums things up and is equally relevant whether working with an Intel or an AMD system.

I can think of several reasons why x264 encoding or AVX / AVX2 / FMA3 apps won't work as a unilateral metric for thermal testing.

(1) A steady-state workload gives steady-state temperatures; encoding does not.

(2) Simplicity in methodology; most users would find encoding apps unfamiliar and cumbersome to accomplish a simple task.

(3) Most users such as gamers never run any apps which use AVX or FMA, so adaptive or manual voltage aside, it makes no sense to downgrade your overclock to accommodate those loads and temps unless you KNOW you will be making significant use of AVX/FMA/AVX2.

(4) Standardization; Prime95 has been around since 1996; many users are familiar with it. It is TRIED and TRUE.

For the minority of users who routinely run AVX/FMA apps, then P95 v28.5 or later can be useful for tweaking the BIOS for thermal and stability testing on THOSE types of systems only. For others, it is not recommended.


regardless of platform or architecture, Prime95 v26.6 works equally well across ALL platforms. Steady-state is the key. How can anyone extrapolate accurate core temperatures from workloads that fluctuate like a bad day on the stock market? They can't. That's why steady state is necessary for testing of thermal compliance and for baseline stability verification.

I'm aware of 5 utilities with steady-state workloads. In order of load level they are:

(1) Prime95 v26.6 - Small FFT's (Important. NOT Blend or Large FFT)
(2) HeavyLoad - Stress CPU
(3) FurMark - CPU Burner
(4) Intel Processor Diagnostic Tool - CPU Load
(5) AIDA64 - Tools - System Stability Test - Stress CPU

AIDA64's Stress CPU fails to load any overclocked / overvolted CPU to get anywhere TDP, and is therefore useless, except for giving naive users a sense of false security because their temps are so low.

HeavyLoad is the closest alternative. Temps and watts are within 3% of Small FFT's.

-Computronix
 

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