Question Disk Boot Failure?

Feb 28, 2019
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I'm pretty new to computers, and I installed a new motherboard and cpu.
The first boot was fine and i was playing just fine on my PC.The next day i booted up my computer was slow and laggy to the point where I had to turn it off,and ever since I did that upon turning my PC back on I get a message that reads disk boot failure in BIOS and tells me to insert a data disk.Ive done everything I could find out the problem but I cant figure it out, I even used my old mobo and CPU and it booted right up.I read somewhere that Microsoft will consider a motherboard a new device but I'm just not sure if that's the problem. Would it really send me to the BIOS and give me disk boot failure because of this? Could I have just bought a bad board?
 

Aeacus

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What you're describing is the failure of your system drive. Not much you can do about it, expect salvage the personal data on it. For a fix, you're looking towards new system drive (SSD/HDD). Just install Win to new system drive and you're good to go.
 
Feb 28, 2019
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What you're describing is the failure of your system drive. Not much you can do about it, expect salvage the personal data on it. For a fix, you're looking towards new system drive (SSD/HDD). Just install Win to new system drive and you're good to go.
Would that explain why my disk % is at 100 in task manager(I hooked up my old mobo) and I'm taking forever to boot
 

Aeacus

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Yes. When HDD (i guess you have HDD) starts dying, you'll get 100% load on HDD prior it completely dying. I've had 2x HDDs dying on me and as soon as i see load on HDD going over 90% for no reason, i pull all my valuable data from it and look towards new HDD. Also, the HDD read/write times increase tremendously when drive is dying. For example, when my WD Blue 500GB HDD was new and filled about 50%, disk defrag on it took about 2-3 hours. When it was dying with same level of fillment, disk defrag took 52 hours.
 
Feb 28, 2019
5
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Yes. When HDD (i guess you have HDD) starts dying, you'll get 100% load on HDD prior it completely dying. I've had 2x HDDs dying on me and as soon as i see load on HDD going over 90% for no reason, i pull all my valuable data from it and look towards new HDD. Also, the HDD read/write times increase tremendously when drive is dying. For example, when my WD Blue 500GB HDD was new and filled about 50%, disk defrag on it took about 2-3 hours. When it was dying with same level of fillment, disk defrag took 52 hours.
Thank you for the help, and one last question is how would I go about transferring data off the hardrive?
 

Aeacus

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To get your data off the dying/dead drive, there are few things to try:

* connect your old HDD to your PC as you'd connect additional drive, with SATA data and power cables. Avoid using any drive docks.
When successful, your PC should read the old HDD as 2nd data drive, from where you can access it and just copy/paste the important data from one drive to another. At all costs, avoid writing anything on the old HDD since that makes the already bad situation worse.

I've recovered several people's data this way when their PC/laptop has died with no ability to boot to OS.

* if given that your PC can't read the old HDD as data drive due to the whole drive corruption, things get though.
Here, you'll need to use data recovery software or use the services of data recovery firm. Do do it on your own, i suggest using Recuva,
link: https://www.ccleaner.com/recuva

I've had microSD card die on me (with holiday pics on it) and i had the most success with Recuva. Most of the free data recovery softwares i tried didn't even recognize my microSD card. Recuva was the only one who recognized it and managed to save good part of my pics.

* as a last resort, when all your attempts have failed, you're looking towards using services of data recovery firm.
Depending on how far gone the drive is, data recovery can be very expensive.
 

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