Question Does the chain oil ruins electronic components on the motherboard?

May 7, 2021
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Sorry really... There is something about my computer that worries me. I lubricated my laptop's display hinge with a quarter drop of oil on paper. And today I saw from the ventilation grille that the oil got on the motherboard! Probably this oil dispersed into a very thin film of the motherboard. (I'm not sure) Because I really used very little amount of oil. Will this damage the motherboard and its components?
 

OrlyP

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Aug 20, 2020
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Even if it doesn't cause a short, it's going to be a dust magnet.

I'd clean off the excess lubrication with contact cleaner just so it doesn't cause a headache down the line.
 
May 7, 2021
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Even if it doesn't cause a short, it's going to be a dust magnet.

I'd clean off the excess lubrication with contact cleaner just so it doesn't cause a headache down the line.
Yes, I cleaned the top of the heatsink ... Will oil residues that remain under the processor and in inaccessible places have long term damage?
 
May 7, 2021
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Most of chain oils are dielectric so no short-circuit in long term.
I used "Shimano Wet Lube". Even it says on the product's label "Prevents corrosion..." I was concerning that it can lead corrosion on the electronic components...

Anyway, there is nothing to do... Thank you very much! :giggle:
 
I used "Shimano Wet Lube"... :giggle:
Being a chain oil it's really not supposed to drip off that readily...kind of strange.

But corrosion isn't going to be a problem. The real problem is it's going to dry out but leave a very sticky residue that will attract dust that won't blow away easily with vacuum or canned air. Dust, being mostly dead skin cells and dander, will be salty and yeah.... corrosive.
 
May 7, 2021
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Being a chain oil it's really not supposed to drip off that readily...kind of strange.

But corrosion isn't going to be a problem. The real problem is it's going to dry out but leave a very sticky residue that will attract dust that won't blow away easily with vacuum or canned air. Dust, being mostly dead skin cells and dander, will be salty and yeah.... corrosive.
So will it make corrosion on copper, iron or other metal parts and solders? Dust is not problem because I cleaned the heatsink. When I opened the bottom cover, I saw only top of the heatsink is oily. Shining annoyingly... After then, cleaned it with a isopropyl alcohol. But what really worries me is if there is oil residue on the circuit parts under the processor, would they be a problem?
 
So will it make corrosion on copper, iron or other metal parts and solders? Dust is not problem because I cleaned the heatsink. When I opened the bottom cover, I saw only top of the heatsink is oily. Shining annoyingly... After then, cleaned it with a isopropyl alcohol. But what really worries me is if there is oil residue on the circuit parts under the processor, would they be a problem?
I really don't think it would be a problem to the heat sink in particular. Reason is heatsinks usually have a chemical conversion finish (usually anodize) to create a thick oxide coating that's impervious to corrosion. Even if not anodized they build up an oxide finish on their own. And if it did corrode copper parts, e.g., exposed traces, about all it would amount to is a discoloration. At least, unless exposed to an accelerating atmosphere, like extremely high humidity and temperature well beyond comfort zone.

But it will still tend to attract dust and not let it go unless brushed off.
 
Reactions: kutluhankaya
May 7, 2021
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I really don't think it would be a problem to the heat sink in particular. Reason is heatsinks usually have a chemical conversion finish (usually anodize) to create a thick oxide coating that's impervious to corrosion. Even if not anodized they build up an oxide finish on their own. And if it did corrode copper parts, e.g., exposed traces, about all it would amount to is a discoloration. At least, unless exposed to an accelerating atmosphere, like extremely high humidity and temperature well beyond comfort zone.

But it will still tend to attract dust and not let it go unless brushed off.
This is so comforting... Thanks a lot! :giggle: My laptop is 7 months old.. So it does not needs a thermal paste renewal. Until it needs a renovation, I'm going to use it as like this. I will clean electronic parts if they are dirty by a dispersed oil when I repair my laptop.
 

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