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[SOLVED] electricity leakage

xJesserX

Prominent
Jul 6, 2019
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Hey ! my problem is i get random electric shocks when i touch my mechanical keyboard ( cooler master ck 550) with brushed aluminum,i'm pretty sure its not static electricity. i took the keyboard and plug it into a smart tv that has a usb input i hold it for 10 min without getting shocked. So,the problem either in the pc ( i don't get shoked when touching the case ) or the house not grounded .
All the wall sockets in the house are like this

and my psu is 80 plus bronze 450W
------
speccy motherboard reading

i want to know if its psu problem or wall socket not grounded problem and thanks !
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, that power strip is grounded, and is actually a decent unit for what it is, but being plugged into a non-grounded outlet means that it is not grounded as well. So the grounding on that power strip is effectively non-existent.

I think your cheap power supply is the far more likely culprit though. Your room socket can't be grounded without running a ground from the socket back to the main panel, and then installing a different outlet in your room that incorporates the ground wire. Usually that means just running a whole new wire run that has the ground included.

The cooler master MWE units are VERY mediocre. They are probably somewhat better than any generic or unknown branded Chinese market units though. Even so, I'd look for something better than those MWE units if you can afford it and if they are available to you.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What is the exact model of your power supply?

I have seen this problem before, actually, there are a few potential causes. Cheap or faulty PSU. Bad static buildup from specific types of carpet. Poorly or not grounded outlets or circuit. To me, that is an ungrounded European style outlet. Grounded outlets will have either two contact points at the top and bottom or a pin that sticks out on the top. Often, those were only used for "wet" rooms. I don't think it's likely to be a problem here, but you never know. Considering you are in a less regulated area there are any number of possibilities including a poorly installed electrical circuit from the panel to the outlet or at the outlet.
 
Reactions: mctrader07

xJesserX

Prominent
Jul 6, 2019
64
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530
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I can't open the case rn but i think its Chinese,i removed all the carped in my room cause i thought its static electricity . So , i need a new psu ? i'm thinking of buying cooler master mwe 450
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, that power strip is grounded, and is actually a decent unit for what it is, but being plugged into a non-grounded outlet means that it is not grounded as well. So the grounding on that power strip is effectively non-existent.

I think your cheap power supply is the far more likely culprit though. Your room socket can't be grounded without running a ground from the socket back to the main panel, and then installing a different outlet in your room that incorporates the ground wire. Usually that means just running a whole new wire run that has the ground included.

The cooler master MWE units are VERY mediocre. They are probably somewhat better than any generic or unknown branded Chinese market units though. Even so, I'd look for something better than those MWE units if you can afford it and if they are available to you.

 
and my psu is 80 plus bronze 450W
Bronze is a level of efficiency. Not a brand.

i think its Chinese
They're all Chinese.

I think your cheap power supply is the far more likely culprit though.
I disagree. All PC power supplies have a measurable amount of leakage current. Even the better brand name ones. If the PSU isn't grounded, you'll feel it through the chassis.

Only a medical grade power supply, with leakage current as low as 0.5mA, is going to guarantee that you don't feel a "tingle" when the system is not grounded.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Noted, however, I've seen a awful LOT of systems that were plugged into ungrounded, two prong only outlets, with the ground contact intentionally broken off, that weren't shocking anybody, while I HAVE, personally, seen low quality power supplies that were plugged into completely normal grounded circuits that WERE causing minor shocks and that went away after replacing them with higher quality units.

In fact, my VERY FIRST post on this forum, many years ago, was specifically about such a case, and was resolved by getting rid of the clients TR2 and replacing it with an M12II.

 
Noted, however, I've seen a awful LOT of systems that were plugged into ungrounded, two prong only outlets, with the ground contact intentionally broken off, that weren't shocking anybody, while I HAVE, personally, seen low quality power supplies that were plugged into completely normal grounded circuits that WERE causing minor shocks and that went away after replacing them with higher quality units.

In fact, my VERY FIRST post on this forum, many years ago, was specifically about such a case, and was resolved by getting rid of the clients TR2 and replacing it with an M12II.

That's really strange. An M12II shouldn't have any less current leakage then a Thermaltake TR2. They should both be around 3.5mA.

The problem could have been that the paint was not removed where the ground screw was screwed in or the ground screw was loose.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'm not saying that the problem was "current leakage", per se. Only that there WAS a problem, and that it DID involve an obvious "shock factor", and that it was resolved by replacing the unit. To be clear, this was one of the older, Tiger direct supplied TR2 units, not one of the newer revised models. I'm sure there are a few other things that could have been to blame internally, although I'm not going to venture guesses on the subject because I don't honestly know.

Even so, I obviously agree that the grounding, or lack of it, is an issue.
 
I'm not saying that the problem was "current leakage", per se. Only that there WAS a problem, and that it DID involve an obvious "shock factor", and that it was resolved by replacing the unit. To be clear, this was one of the older, Tiger direct supplied TR2 units, not one of the newer revised models. I'm sure there are a few other things that could have been to blame internally, although I'm not going to venture guesses on the subject because I don't honestly know.

Even so, I obviously agree that the grounding, or lack of it, is an issue.
I'm familiar with the TR2. 2004 to 2005. I had a 480W with only 17A on the +12V rail (204W!). It blew up when I tried to put 20A on the +12V rail (guess there was no OCP!). Total garbage. Those looked like they were assembled by 5 year olds with ADHD. A real low point in Thermaltake history. But it shouldn't energize the case.

Maybe something inside the PSU was shorting to ground, like a too long leg on one of the secondary caps or a wire that pinched inside the PSU housing. But not something that's indicative of that particular model.
 
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