Ethernet_to_Desktop and Ethernet_to_Wireless_Router

RamboPenguin

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Sep 8, 2015
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I need a 2 port ethernet splitter that allows service to the wireless router and a desktop computer. It needs to not hinder the speed of the internet service either by it going through the connection point that splits it. I can't find one that has good reviews so any suggestions? Would a 4-port ethernet switch divide the connection into 4 even if only 2 ethernet cables are coming out of it.

What I need this for is that the ISP router/modem thing (not the wireless thing) only has one ethernet port on the back of it, so only one thing can receive the internet service. I need service to go to the wireless router and going to my room via ethernet cable. So pretty much I need a 1 to 2 ethernet port splitter/switcher/hub thing so I can have the wireless router connected and my desktop connected via wired connection.

Hope this makes sense. I don't know if I need a hub, switch or splitter but recommend some things that would help.

 

Calculagator

Admirable
What you need is a switch. That will actually allow both your WiFi and your desktop to have as fast a network connection as possible. It sort of splits things but in an intelligent way so that if you are only using one, it will get all of the speed. You will have to share the bandwidth that your ISP provides, but a switch won't slow down traffic at all. If you are only using it for internet, a 10/100 switch is fast enough. If you will be transferring files between computers or backing up, you should get a gigabit switch. They might cost up to $20.
 

RamboPenguin

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Sep 8, 2015
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I'm having a hard time finding a 2-port one. A 4-port one wouldn't affect it if there are only 2 plugged into it right? (like it wouldn't give 1/4 the speed to the wireless router and 1/4 to the desktop just because there are 4 available ports) I read something weird like that somewhere so I just want to make sure that that won't happen
 
If your ISP's device only has 1 port then chances are it's a modem. Every wireless router has a single port off the side for the modem. The other 4 ports on the back of router are a connected switch. Any device you wire to these ports will have internet access through the modem port.
 

Calculagator

Admirable

A two port switch would actually need 3 ports: one for input and two for output. Manufacturers have standardized on multiples of 4 for switches to keep things simple.
You don't need to worry at all about having your speed cut. What you describe is not at all what happens in a switch in a home network. You would get the same performance with a "2" port switch as with a 48 port switch.

 

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