Question First time building pc, anything wrong here?

Good or bad?


  • Total voters
    1
Sep 12, 2019
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Specs:
Intel Core i7 8700K (CPU)
Nvidia GTX 1080Ti (GPU)
HyperX 16GB DDR4 (RAM)
Samsung 860 EVO 500GB (SSD)
Seagate Barracuda HDD 1TB (HDD)
MSi B450 TOMAHAWK MAX (Motherboard)
Corsair CX650M 650-watt (PSU)
 

digitalgriffin

Distinguished
Specs:
Intel Core i7 8700K (CPU)
Nvidia GTX 1080Ti (GPU)
HyperX 16GB DDR4 (RAM)
Samsung 860 EVO 500GB (SSD)
Seagate Barracuda HDD 1TB (HDD)
MSi B450 TOMAHAWK MAX (Motherboard)
Corsair CX650M 650-watt (PSU)
B450 chipset is for AMD only

I would never buy a 1080Ti now. They cost a fortune used. Get a NVIDIA RTX2070 Super, NVIDIA RTX2080 Super, or AMD 5700XT. Speed of your RAM is important too. It also depends on your intended use too. If you want 4K gaming then RTX2080 Super. If you want 1440p you can run AMD's 5700XT and save some coin ($415 give or take with a decent cooler). Ray Tracing on anything less then a 2080 Super really isn't worth it. You'll often hit sub 60fps at 1080p

The new Corsair CX's are okay. People always make the mistake of cheaping out on power supply. Quality of power and warranty are important with mid to high end gaming builds.

I would aim for a TX-M or RMx series if possible. Or a Seasonic Focus Plus.
 

digitalgriffin

Distinguished
You will not be able to overclock, with that board.
B350/B450 chipset supports overclocking. So I'm a bit confused by this statement. It's the A series chips that don't overclock.

Although the Asus Prime series aren't the best quality motherboards. The first choice of MSi B450 TOMAHAWK MAX was a much better pick. Slap that with a R5 2600 or R7 2700 and you are good to go. That would make a formidable gaming machine
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
Yeah, I like the new Corsair CX as a budget PSU as much as anyone does, but when we're dealing with parts like a higher-end i7 and an expensive GPU, a higher-tier PSU is in order, like the Corsairs recommended by dg or a SeaSonic Focus/Prime, or an EVGA G2/G3/GS/T2/P2.
 
selected new motherboard: asus prime b360-plus, anything wrong with this one too?
It'll work but the power delivery looks a bit too weak for that cpu.

Alternatively, you can stick with the board you originally chose and get a Ryzen 5 3600 instead of the i7, the performance is nearly identical, the price is much lower and you won't need an aftermarket cooler for it.
 
Sep 12, 2019
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B450 chipset is for AMD only

I would never buy a 1080Ti now. They cost a fortune used. Get a NVIDIA RTX2070 Super, NVIDIA RTX2080 Super, or AMD 5700XT. Speed of your RAM is important too. It also depends on your intended use too. If you want 4K gaming then RTX2080 Super. If you want 1440p you can run AMD's 5700XT and save some coin ($415 give or take with a decent cooler). Ray Tracing on anything less then a 2080 Super really isn't worth it. You'll often hit sub 60fps at 1080p

The new Corsair CX's are okay. People always make the mistake of cheaping out on power supply. Quality of power and warranty are important with mid to high end gaming builds.

I would aim for a TX-M or RMx series if possible. Or a Seasonic Focus Plus.
Hello, a MSI GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER VENTUS OC is okay?

is it a bottleneck with an i7 8700K?
 
Sep 12, 2019
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You really want to be looking at Z370 motherboards, not B360 ones. You're paying, after all, for a CPU that can be overclocked so it's a bit of a waste to pair it with motherboards that cannot take advantage.
Found a MSI Z370-A PRO
Anything wrong with that?
I trust you.
 
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor (€199.00 @ Caseking)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard (€118.90 @ Amazon Deutschland)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (€75.99 @ Amazon Deutschland)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (€99.00 @ Amazon Deutschland)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB Red Dragon Video Card (€423.89 @ Mindfactory)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply (€73.85 @ Mindfactory)
Total: €990.63
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-14 18:21 CEST+0200


200€ Ryzen 5 3600 vs 350€ i7 8700k:
View: https://youtu.be/BXRHanb-BmY


~420€ RX 5700 XT vs ~530€ RTX 2070 Super:
View: https://youtu.be/u0WLJXAwaY0
 

digitalgriffin

Distinguished
Im not personally a fan, or have knowledge about AMD processors, nor the graphics cards. Could you help me a little?
Personally a fan or not, it's about getting you the biggest bang for your buck. If you absolutely need to have the fastest then without a doubt it will be Intel + NVIDIA. BUT (and that's a big BUT) if you have a target price window, then up to about $1200-$1500 system AMD will get you a faster system. Compare a $1200 Intel + NVIDIA system to a $1200 AMD + AMD system and you'll win with AMD.

The 2070Super is a good card. You will pay a bit of NVIDIA tax on it. It's a good 1440p card and a 4K card with some of the settings turned down.

As with everything it's about balance. at 1080p, the CPU typically becomes the limiting factor for frame rates. At 1440p it's a mix (depending on game/setup) at 4K, the video card becomes the limiting factor.

As with all things, it's about balance. And your gaming style (casual, eSports, AAA games), other uses, and monitor choice will affect what you should purchase.
 
Sep 12, 2019
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Personally a fan or not, it's about getting you the biggest bang for your buck. If you absolutely need to have the fastest then without a doubt it will be Intel + NVIDIA. BUT (and that's a big BUT) if you have a target price window, then up to about $1200-$1500 system AMD will get you a faster system. Compare a $1200 Intel + NVIDIA system to a $1200 AMD + AMD system and you'll win with AMD.

The 2070Super is a good card. You will pay a bit of NVIDIA tax on it. It's a good 1440p card and a 4K card with some of the settings turned down.

As with everything it's about balance. at 1080p, the CPU typically becomes the limiting factor for frame rates. At 1440p it's a mix (depending on game/setup) at 4K, the video card becomes the limiting factor.

As with all things, it's about balance. And your gaming style (casual, eSports, AAA games), other uses, and monitor choice will affect what you should purchase.
Im pretty sure ill change 8700K to 9700K since it produces less bottleneck (0.21%) And ill definitely check out some of those AMD cpus and cards, for sure.
 
Sep 12, 2019
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Im pretty sure ill change 8700K to 9700K since it produces less bottleneck (0.21%) And ill definitely check out some of those AMD cpus and cards, for sure.
Hello, found some bottleneck calculator, turns out the combination you gave me stands up to be an average 8% bottleneck.
The setup I arranged had 0.82% bottleneck.

PS: the calculator might be wrong, dont blame me.

PS#2: the previous 0.21% is wrong
 
Here you go on the on the Intel side with a 8700K. I have added the Gigabyte Z390 Gaming X motherboard which has a great 10 phase VRM and is cost effective. RAM at DDR4 3200 and a decent Gold power supply. A 500GB NVMe Crucial P1 SSD which is very fast. This should give you an idea as to what you can do. The 8700K is a great Gaming CPU but if you can get the 9700K even better as it is right up there with the 9900K on the gaming side.

I have not added the GTX 1080Ti as I presume you already have it...but if not just add...

You could go to a 9700K which is only about $25 to $30 more

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/4t3NNq

CPU: Intel Core i7-8700K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($354.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($65.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 GAMING X ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P1 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($66.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($42.89 @ OutletPC)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($76.88 @ OutletPC)
Total: $807.51
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-15 12:06 EDT-0400
 
Sep 12, 2019
13
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Hey, thanks
Here you go on the on the Intel side with a 8700K. I have added the Gigabyte Z390 Gaming X motherboard which has a great 10 phase VRM and is cost effective. RAM at DDR4 3200 and a decent Gold power supply. A 500GB NVMe Crucial P1 SSD which is very fast. This should give you an idea as to what you can do. The 8700K is a great Gaming CPU but if you can get the 9700K even better as it is right up there with the 9900K on the gaming side.

I have not added the GTX 1080Ti as I presume you already have it...but if not just add...

You could go to a 9700K which is only about $25 to $30 more

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/4t3NNq

CPU: Intel Core i7-8700K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($354.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($65.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 GAMING X ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P1 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($66.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($42.89 @ OutletPC)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($76.88 @ OutletPC)
Total: $807.51
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-15 12:06 EDT-0400
Hey, thanks. Exactly what i needed to see.
 

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