'FOVE 0' VR HMD Hardware, Minimum System Specs Finalized

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bit_user

Splendid
Herald
less than one degree of accuracy
This makes it sound bad.

Typically, this would be written as Accuracy: +/- 1.0 degree. Or, worded as "Accurate to within one degree".

Also, it'd be nice to know what APIs it supports. For instance, what about Valve's OpenVR?

And current pricing (or lack thereof) would be appreciated. I visited the website, but saw only a wait-list link.
 

Dunzaus

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Feb 21, 2016
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70 Hz? HMD's need Atleast 90 Hz so that you won't get a headache, so that just fails right out of the box..?
 

bit_user

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I think the issue is more one of nausea, and the level of sensitivity supposedly depends on the individual. Also, I think some people can adjust to the experience. The type of content is also a factor.
 

Sakkura

Illustrious


A headache is one way VR sickness can manifest, nausea is another. It depends on the person and circumstances.

And yeah overall sensitivity to VR sickness is very individual and content-dependent, but there's a reason Vive and Rift both picked 90 Hz. That's what it takes to avoid VR sickness for most people in most content.
 

Zapin

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Dec 15, 2015
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The 70hz thing is definitely a drawback and it seems to share the Oculus weakness of seated or standing experiences only using a standard controller. Oculus has a road map to overcome its shortcomings in this regard when the Touch Controllers come out and I suspect that when this happens even more developers will shift towards a more complete VR experience that something like the FOVE may be incapable of showing (unless they themselves plan to add hardware in the future).

If the Eye tracking does indeed prove itself more than a gimmick via UI control and FOVEATED RENDERING then perhaps the FOVE may contribute to the evolution of VR but that remains to be seen and with a MSRP estimated to be around $350 US it will be a hard sell for most people when there are more widely adopted options availible for only a bit more money.
 

computerguy72

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Sep 22, 2011
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Kinda disappointed at those specs. I thought the point was foveated rendering and that doesn't seem to be where they are going with it at all. I don't see how they would attract any new customers with a poor mans rift/vive + eye tracking. It's pixel density would need to be much higher to take true advantage of that feature.
 

bit_user

Splendid
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Their biggest shortcoming will probably be the software library, unless they can add support for seated Vive titles through OpenVR. But their website indicates only a proprietary API, meaning developers would have to explicitly support their HMD.

How do you know it doesn't do foveated rendering? Maybe they can support a much richer environment than Rift or Vive, on the same spec PC.

Let's not forget that GTX 970 is a relatively lower-spec card than when Rift & Vive launched. So, if the purchase price of this thing is low, then you might be looking at a considerably cheaper solution.

Ultimately, their goal might be to get snapped up by a bigger player. Maybe this HMD is just the next step towards that.
 

Sakkura

Illustrious


What? GTX 970 and R9 290 is the same spec as the Rift and Vive had at launch.

FOVE has a higher resolution to drive (well, at least the basic screen resolution), but at a lower refresh rate. So we're seeing the same hardware requirements for a similar workload.
 
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