HELP: Space Encounters cabient trying to fix/learn

G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade (More info?)

If this is the wrong board to ask for help, please inform me of the
correct forum to post to .........

I picked up a free Space Encounters cabinet which I would like to fix
in an effort to learn how to "fix a machine". Are there any websites
which detail how to approach fixing an arcade cabinet.

The game supposedly booted up and could be heard but the monitor was
garbled. I looked around the web and I would assume the problem is
due to bad RAM, which I understand is very common on such machines.
However, when I got home with the cabinet, the monitor no longer comes
up at all, so I am not quite sure what happened.

I was directed to the following Space Encounters manual .....

http://www.arcadedocs.com/vidmanuals/S/SpaceEncounters.pdf

.... and was told how to test whether the power supply board was
producing the required 16.5V-Ac, 9.0V-Ac, 9.0-Ac, 16.5V-Ac and 5V-Dc,
12V-Dc, -5V-Dc values. Based on the pinouts and color coding of the
wires in the PDF file, I did verify the power supply was producing
these values.

I have no idea what to try next...... :>(

Keep in mind, I pulled out the switch which is mounted on the back
door wooden panel, so this should always allow current to flow through
while I am working on it. I also turned on the machine by switching
on the switch mounted on top of the machine. When I do this I heard a
"hummmmm" in the machine, so I know something is "on" ... probably the
monitor warming up. I then verified 120V were going to both of these
switches as well as the monitor molex plug. Also, I have no coin door
and there is no slam switch which I can see. The previous owner told
me the machine turned on and the monitor was garbled even though there
was no coin door, so I do not believe the slam switch stuff applies to
my cabinet. Now, however, the monitor no longer comes up ...... so I
am trying to solve this problem first .. of course.

Anyway, I have no idea what to test/try next. I am not good at
electronics, but consider myself somewhat smart so hopefully I will be
able to catch on to what people recommend me do...... My work has a
plotter so I was able to print out big circuit diagrams from the PDF
file I referenced above ... which makes looking at them easier. Of
course, since I have no background in electrical anything, I simply
just look at these diagrams and marvel at all the lines which connect
everything.

Any ideas on what I should test next? If so, please describe what I
should do........ thanks. Hopefully there is a website which will
enligthen me as well ..... however, if someone here would love to take
me on as a pet project ... that would be excellent.

PS: I have a few game logic boards and a couple of main PCB boards
and I think I also have a couple of extra sound boards, so I hope I
have enough "pieces" to try to fix this thing.....
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade (More info?)

Well, you picked a rather uncommon game to start with. I doubt many
people in the newsgroup have seen one of those let alone worked on one.

Not knowing which monitor is in there, I'm not sure what kind of advice
to give you. I'm sure you will have some difficulty finding parts for
it unless it happens to use the same monitor as a Space Invaders or
similar black and white game. Some of the black and white monitors I
have found in the older games are difficult to find parts for.

Without a test bench and/or some knowledge of circuit board logic, you
probably have a long road ahead of you. You could find someone to
repair your game circuit board by possibly offering your spare boards as
partial payment (if they are interested). There are several individuals
in the group that might be interested, but then again maybe not.

You might be better off posting a photo of the game and seeing if anyone
is interested in purchasing it and then using the proceeds to purchase
and work on a game that has a lot more parts available and a lot more
knowledge floating around the web. Say a centipede, or Donkey Kong or
something else like that.

Based on your descriptions, I'm thinking the hum is either the power
supply or the transformer for a fluorescent light fixture (if it has
fluorescent lights) You want to hear a very high pitched sound coming
from the monitor or a crackle as you power it up. It is easier to hear
from the back of the machine with the door off. If you don't hear
either of those, then you need to check fuses on the monitor board (with
the power off) and see if one may have blown.

The garbled graphics could be due to dried out electrolytic capacitors
on the monitor board but could also be attributed to bad ram or other
chips on the game circuit board as well. I am by no means an expert on
board repair and am only sharing my meager knowledge of these things.

Free games are good except when you are in over your head. Again, the
lack of parts for this game might make it tough to get repaired.

If you post your location, you might find somebody near that could take
a gander at it and give you a little better advice than what I have.

Best of luck.

Pat D.


Dino2 wrote:
> If this is the wrong board to ask for help, please inform me of the
> correct forum to post to .........
>
> I picked up a free Space Encounters cabinet which I would like to fix
> in an effort to learn how to "fix a machine". Are there any websites
> which detail how to approach fixing an arcade cabinet.
>
> The game supposedly booted up and could be heard but the monitor was
> garbled. I looked around the web and I would assume the problem is
> due to bad RAM, which I understand is very common on such machines.
> However, when I got home with the cabinet, the monitor no longer comes
> up at all, so I am not quite sure what happened.
>
> I was directed to the following Space Encounters manual .....
>
> http://www.arcadedocs.com/vidmanuals/S/SpaceEncounters.pdf
>
> ... and was told how to test whether the power supply board was
> producing the required 16.5V-Ac, 9.0V-Ac, 9.0-Ac, 16.5V-Ac and 5V-Dc,
> 12V-Dc, -5V-Dc values. Based on the pinouts and color coding of the
> wires in the PDF file, I did verify the power supply was producing
> these values.
>
> I have no idea what to try next...... :>(
>
> Keep in mind, I pulled out the switch which is mounted on the back
> door wooden panel, so this should always allow current to flow through
> while I am working on it. I also turned on the machine by switching
> on the switch mounted on top of the machine. When I do this I heard a
> "hummmmm" in the machine, so I know something is "on" ... probably the
> monitor warming up. I then verified 120V were going to both of these
> switches as well as the monitor molex plug. Also, I have no coin door
> and there is no slam switch which I can see. The previous owner told
> me the machine turned on and the monitor was garbled even though there
> was no coin door, so I do not believe the slam switch stuff applies to
> my cabinet. Now, however, the monitor no longer comes up ...... so I
> am trying to solve this problem first .. of course.
>
> Anyway, I have no idea what to test/try next. I am not good at
> electronics, but consider myself somewhat smart so hopefully I will be
> able to catch on to what people recommend me do...... My work has a
> plotter so I was able to print out big circuit diagrams from the PDF
> file I referenced above ... which makes looking at them easier. Of
> course, since I have no background in electrical anything, I simply
> just look at these diagrams and marvel at all the lines which connect
> everything.
>
> Any ideas on what I should test next? If so, please describe what I
> should do........ thanks. Hopefully there is a website which will
> enligthen me as well ..... however, if someone here would love to take
> me on as a pet project ... that would be excellent.
>
> PS: I have a few game logic boards and a couple of main PCB boards
> and I think I also have a couple of extra sound boards, so I hope I
> have enough "pieces" to try to fix this thing.....
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade (More info?)

Where are the fuses and how do I check them? I mean will I be able
to tell if they are blown or not, or do I need to put a multimeter to
them some how.

If they are blown, where do I get replacements?


On 21 Mar 2005 18:48:59 -0800, docfrankie@hotmail.com wrote:

>check the fuses first
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade (More info?)

Fuses are those little glass tubes mounted in shiny metal brackets.
They are usually about 1 1/4 inches long. You can usually look in the
glass portion to see if the metal "fuse" part is broken or burned
through. If it is, get a replacement of the same value. You can also
use a multi-meter and check for continuity from end to end of the fuse.

The fuses are usually mounted on the base of the cabinet near the power
supply (sometimes under a paper covering) or on the monitor chassis
itself. Use a flashlight, you should be able to find them.

The users manual on klov.com should help you.

Pat

Dino2 wrote:
> Where are the fuses and how do I check them? I mean will I be able
> to tell if they are blown or not, or do I need to put a multimeter to
> them some how.
>
> If they are blown, where do I get replacements?
>
>
> On 21 Mar 2005 18:48:59 -0800, docfrankie@hotmail.com wrote:
>
>
>>check the fuses first
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.video.arcade (More info?)

Ok, the two fuses mounted on the floor next to the isolation
transformer and filter test fine with continuity.

Taking off the back door panel to access the back of the monitor
revealed two fuse locations. The location marked ".75 Amp" had a fuse
in it which tested continuity fine. The location marked "1.5Amp" did
not have a fuse in it at all. Should I only have one fuse out of
these two?

PS: The monitor tube does not glow at all when the machine is turned
on. Is there anything else I can do to check the monitor without
killing myself?




On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 10:46:36 -0600, Pat D <patdanis@comcast.net>
wrote:

>Fuses are those little glass tubes mounted in shiny metal brackets.
>They are usually about 1 1/4 inches long. You can usually look in the
>glass portion to see if the metal "fuse" part is broken or burned
>through. If it is, get a replacement of the same value. You can also
>use a multi-meter and check for continuity from end to end of the fuse.
>
>The fuses are usually mounted on the base of the cabinet near the power
>supply (sometimes under a paper covering) or on the monitor chassis
>itself. Use a flashlight, you should be able to find them.
>
>The users manual on klov.com should help you.
>
>Pat
>
>Dino2 wrote:
>> Where are the fuses and how do I check them? I mean will I be able
>> to tell if they are blown or not, or do I need to put a multimeter to
>> them some how.
>>
>> If they are blown, where do I get replacements?
>>
>>
>> On 21 Mar 2005 18:48:59 -0800, docfrankie@hotmail.com wrote:
>>
>>
>>>check the fuses first
>>
>>
 

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