High idle temp for i5 2400

bearclaw99

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You shouldn't be idling @ 50 C even with the Intel stock cooler, but personally I wouldn't use that anyways. I usually just drop them in the trash when I get a processor. The Arctic you list would be a good choice. You don't need anything higher end since you can't really overclock the 2400
 

vcb003104

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ok.. I just realised that the arctic one I mentioned might not fit in my case... are there any more smaller size ones recommended?? i'm using a middle tower case.
 
G

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a bit off topic, but i run a i5 2400 @ 3.8 Ghz stable as a rock with 3.1 Ghz @ stock settings, and i still have some OC capabilities left, i can push it over 4 Ghz, but not stable enough, so i think 2400 is great for overclocking :bounce:

and running @ 45 degrees idle temp and with max stresstest it goes up to 70 degrees max (temp measured @ i5 cores, NOT at MB sensor!!)
 

shanky887614

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a bit off topic, but i run a i5 2400 @ 3.8 Ghz stable as a rock with 3.1 Ghz @ stock settings, and i still have some OC capabilities left, i can push it over 4 Ghz, but not stable enough, so i think 2400 is great for overclocking :bounce:

and running @ 45 degrees idle temp and with max stresstest it goes up to 70 degrees max (temp measured @ i5 cores, NOT at MB sensor!!)

the problem is simple

the core i5 2400 has a locked multiplier

if i remember right the fsb is linked into other components so by raising the fsb you put more stress on other components

this is why people that want to overclock go for a k series cpu e.g. i5 2500k

where they can raise the multipler, get better speeds without touching the voltage or fsb



this is a quote of what i failed to explain

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Oh my....... Okay, here it goes. :lol:

The BCLK/FSB is what is known as the base clock or front side bus. You have that, which current AMD CPUs have a FSB of 200Mhz, and current Intel CPUs have a 100Mhz BCLK. (AMD calls their's FSB and Intel calls their's BLCK in the BIOS) Whatever that is multiplied by the multiplier gives you your speed. 100Mhz BCLK/FSB with a multiplier of 44 = ____? You guessed it, 4400Mhz! It is just like multiplying, because well, that IS what it is. The FSB/BCLK will also mess around with RAM and other things, so don't touch it, as it can really damage your CPU and/or board. LEAVE IT ALONE!

When OCing, you WILL have a 100Mhz BCLK on that 2400, which has a multiplier of __? 31! Because 31 x 100 gives you 3100! You also have a turbo multiplier. On full load, your CPU will operate with 3.1Ghz, with 3 cores, 3.2Ghz, 2 cores, 3.3Ghz, and 1 core, 3.4Ghz. So it turbos as it needs more power if the application only uses a certain amount of threads/cores.

What you are going to do it change that turbo core's multiplier. You have it set to . like I said, 1 core 34, 2 cores 33, 3 cores 32, and 4 cores 31. Change it to something like 1 core 36, 2 cores 35, 3 cores 34, and 4 cores 33. If it crashes add a little little extra turbo vcore voltage. It shouldn't crash though. Also, you will want a decent cooler to stay under temps! I really wouldn't suggest any of this without a "k" series CPU though.
 

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