How should i continue with programming?

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General Kenobi

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Sep 19, 2018
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Not pro or con "C"....

However, you might look ahead a bit and consider Python.

https://towardsdatascience.com/why-python-is-not-the-programming-language-of-the-future-30ddc5339b66

And I deliberately picked that "not" link just to be generally fair about the matter.

There are other articles to the contrary: research (aka "Google") "Python Popularity".

Learning to redo some of your "past" C projects in another language may prove overall more beneficial than delving into deeper "C" projects.

Plus, there are some very good Python books available. Sams (with full acknowledgement to @Mandark) included.
Thanks for your opinion and yes i had already decided to learn python after 'C'
 

General Kenobi

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yes, python is a WONDERFUL language with TONS of support! I adore it. You can develop super clean, readable code and do so much with so little code too. absolutely learn that.

some coding editors support python extensions, so you could practice by creating and debugging a real extension that does something useful in the editor.

i love using it for testing software and windows automation

plus you can use linux and develop all you want, no need to run windows. cross platform applications. make some of that
Thanks sir definitely in my 'to learn list'
 

hotaru.hino

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Sep 1, 2020
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I'm going to throw some two cents into this.

The biggest thing I have to say about when learning programming is the language is irrelevant. It doesn't really matter what language you use, as you can learn the basics of programming from almost any language. I had my start with TI BASIC and VisualBasic, one that's never used in any serious capacity and one that for some reason still crops up in job postings (it's not really used outside of maintaining some old VB app or Office macro). As long as you learn things like how to go about developing algorithms and know how to structure your code well, then I'd argue you're learning how to program. Language "features" (for lack of a better term) like object-oriented or whatever are just tools to facilitate the basics.

On that end, if someone were to ask me the burning question of "what language should I start with" and they're starting from scratch, I say Python for the following reasons:
  • It's stupid easy to setup and get going. You basically install it, open a command line, type "python" and you can start coding.
  • You can move from the interpreter to source files with ease
  • Since it's multi-paradigm, you can start with procedural programming like C, then move onto object oriented like C++ (though the object oriented feature in Python feels tacked on as an afterthought)
The only gripe I have with Python is that it's a dynamically typed language. Meaning that you don't have to declare what kind of data a variable is. While this is nice from a convenience point of view, it can be a pain in the butt.

Otherwise if you have some idea what kind of apps or whatnot you want to do, start with something closer to that. For instance if you're wanting to get into web page or web app development, I'd recommend starting with JavaScript, despite how headbanging it can be at times.

But just remember, the language is irrelevant. All that matters is you learn the basics. If you're working from examples, take care to read beyond the code samples
 

General Kenobi

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Sep 19, 2018
692
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I'm going to throw some two cents into this.

The biggest thing I have to say about when learning programming is the language is irrelevant. It doesn't really matter what language you use, as you can learn the basics of programming from almost any language. I had my start with TI BASIC and VisualBasic, one that's never used in any serious capacity and one that for some reason still crops up in job postings (it's not really used outside of maintaining some old VB app or Office macro). As long as you learn things like how to go about developing algorithms and know how to structure your code well, then I'd argue you're learning how to program. Language "features" (for lack of a better term) like object-oriented or whatever are just tools to facilitate the basics.

On that end, if someone were to ask me the burning question of "what language should I start with" and they're starting from scratch, I say Python for the following reasons:
  • It's stupid easy to setup and get going. You basically install it, open a command line, type "python" and you can start coding.
  • You can move from the interpreter to source files with ease
  • Since it's multi-paradigm, you can start with procedural programming like C, then move onto object oriented like C++ (though the object oriented feature in Python feels tacked on as an afterthought)
The only gripe I have with Python is that it's a dynamically typed language. Meaning that you don't have to declare what kind of data a variable is. While this is nice from a convenience point of view, it can be a pain in the butt.

Otherwise if you have some idea what kind of apps or whatnot you want to do, start with something closer to that. For instance if you're wanting to get into web page or web app development, I'd recommend starting with JavaScript, despite how headbanging it can be at times.

But just remember, the language is irrelevant. All that matters is you learn the basics. If you're working from examples, take care to read beyond the code samples
Thank you so much the knowledge you gave me is well above two cents and is priceless to me:) I have already started with C language as i learnt that many Computer BIOS and also OS are written in C,C+ and as i love computers I've also taken computer science as my subjects and I've joined college this year. The most difficult thing for me was to find resources ,and recently many good folks at this thread recommended me 'Sams teach yourself ..' which is helping me alot, and with your advise I can understand stuff of 'how to learn coding' more efficiently. Thanks again for pointing me towards the right direction:)
 
Dec 16, 2020
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My 2 cents is look into how to code crypto and then become good at that.

Crypto is looking more and more like its about to explode. Getting in on this early may pay off big.
 

Math Geek

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right and crypto/blockchain is used for more than just bitcoin and mining.

it has other uses which are being developed and starting to be implemented here and there. so learning crypto will extend beyond mining and into more mainstream uses in the future.
 
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