Question I am trying to fix my old TV, please help!

Sep 12, 2019
8
0
10
0
Hello everyone, I am not sure if this the correct place to post this but I need some help.

I am trying to fix my old TV, I don't remember the model but it has this panel (LC370EUH-SCA1-LG - https://datasheetspdf.com/datasheet/LC370EUH-SCA1.html). Actually the TV had issues like visual noise and slow motion, so after doing some research I came to the conclusion that the main board had issues processing the images. That's why I bought a Universal TV board and tried fixing it.

Those are the parts that I got:

1) https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32826581382.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.4fe24c4dHp8CwD

2) https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32828282415.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.4fe24c4dHp8CwD



The parts arrived and it took me twice as much research as I had done before, to figure out how I could connect the universal board to my TV's power supply. And I made it I had backlight.

The problem is that I had no picture at all, I tried to install different firmwares, and tried to use some other cables I had, but nothing changed.

I suppose the connect board that I also bought isn't compatible with my panel.

That's why I wanted to ask someone before I ditched the project. I would appreciate any help, suggestions, or even any compatible parts that you know they would work!

Thanks for your time and help, in advance! :)
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Unfortunately we are in a time and age where repairing things is not only difficult but sometimes impossible.

Simply because manufacturer's (of any sort) do not want things to be repaired. They prefer and want us to buy new stuff.

If something does happen to be repairable, real replacement parts are expensive and/or the market gets flooded with cheap, low end generic components. Often of low quality and lacking documentation of any sort.

"Compatible with" may simply mean that Part A fits into Slot B.....

Then you are likely to run into proprietary tool requirements or other necessities that must also be on hand. For example you need to purchase an entire kit of some sort just for one component.

E.g., maybe solder in a replacement capacitor if you can identify the proper replacement, have excellent soldering skills, and a PCB that will not easily melt.

All for DIY repairs etc. but the efforts are seldom worth the time, effort, and costs.

Working on a broken can opener right now. Trying to "super glue" the safety tab back into place.

Perfectly good can opener otherwise - just a well-designed tab to hit its' EOL (End -of -Life) and disable the entire can opener.

Most glues and the plastic tab seem to be incompatible. Will not bond at all....

If you have the time, inclination, etc. to pursue repairs - no harm in trying. But establish an endgame point (i.e., costs or hours spent) beforehand.
 
Sep 12, 2019
8
0
10
0
Unfortunately we are in a time and age where repairing things is not only difficult but sometimes impossible.

Simply because manufacturer's (of any sort) do not want things to be repaired. They prefer and want us to buy new stuff.

If something does happen to be repairable, real replacement parts are expensive and/or the market gets flooded with cheap, low end generic components. Often of low quality and lacking documentation of any sort.

"Compatible with" may simply mean that Part A fits into Slot B.....

Then you are likely to run into proprietary tool requirements or other necessities that must also be on hand. For example you need to purchase an entire kit of some sort just for one component.

E.g., maybe solder in a replacement capacitor if you can identify the proper replacement, have excellent soldering skills, and a PCB that will not easily melt.

All for DIY repairs etc. but the efforts are seldom worth the time, effort, and costs.

Working on a broken can opener right now. Trying to "super glue" the safety tab back into place.

Perfectly good can opener otherwise - just a well-designed tab to hit its' EOL (End -of -Life) and disable the entire can opener.

Most glues and the plastic tab seem to be incompatible. Will not bond at all....

If you have the time, inclination, etc. to pursue repairs - no harm in trying. But establish an endgame point (i.e., costs or hours spent) beforehand.
Thanks for your reply I really appreciate it!
Actually I wanted to do this project as a learning process too. Though my biggest concern is that I feel bad throwing away a TV that "seems" good. But yeah, I probably will have to ditch the project if I will be spending more than buying a new TV xD.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY