Question I just want to know how much my psu Watts should be

Mar 28, 2020
2
0
10
0
Soon I'm going to build my first system :D. And I want to know which power supply will be the best, here are the specs that I think will go with(don't mind the parts it's my first pc):
CPU:R5 2600/3600
GPU:1650 super
Mobo: b450 tomahawk/ steel legend
ram 2x8 ddr4 3200
1tb hdd 7200rpm
I think I will put 1 rgb strip
and for the psu I hope you guys to help
 

jonnyguru

Distinguished
how do you guys distinguish between quality and non-quality?
is it the gold rating?
Well, if by "Gold Rating", you mean "80 PLUS Gold", that can be one indicator if you don't want to do too much research. There aren't any "bad" 80 PLUS Gold rated power supplies as it takes a little more engineering to reach that level of efficiency or higher. But then there are some companies that "fake" their 80 PLUS rating, so it's best to stick with a reputable brand.

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/80-plus-psu-efficiency,4848-8.html
 
Jan 22, 2020
24
3
15
0
Well, if by "Gold Rating", you mean "80 PLUS Gold", that can be one indicator if you don't want to do too much research. There aren't any "bad" 80 PLUS Gold rated power supplies as it takes a little more engineering to reach that level of efficiency or higher. But then there are some companies that "fake" their 80 PLUS rating, so it's best to stick with a reputable brand.

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/80-plus-psu-efficiency,4848-8.html
Thanks
(I was looking to get a new psu to power my gtx1650s & its all honestly starting to get a bit confusing)
 
Jan 22, 2020
24
3
15
0
Which aspects are confusing. We can try to help clear them up.
wow thank you! you guys are so kind

i just spent the last (i dont even know how many) minuets reading through this https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/psu-buying-guide,2916-13.html

and i think i only understood about firstly not buying cheap psu as they're dangerous, and that the higher wattage doesn't always mean its better or more efficient for what i may need?
and something about 12V+ providing a good amount of wattage to be truly efficient as some psu may not provide a lot of power to them
Also that the ratings give an indication of how much energy is used at specific loads, idle and (i think full?) load

i initially thought it was just a simple matter of PC+components require (example) 500W, so a psu with 600W+ would be enough to power it, but i think i was wrong.. im rather confused at the moment to be completely honest lol😖
 

jonnyguru

Distinguished
wow thank you! you guys are so kind

i just spent the last (i dont even know how many) minuets reading through this https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/psu-buying-guide,2916-13.html

and i think i only understood about firstly not buying cheap psu as they're dangerous, and that the higher wattage doesn't always mean its better or more efficient for what i may need?
and something about 12V+ providing a good amount of wattage to be truly efficient as some psu may not provide a lot of power to them
Also that the ratings give an indication of how much energy is used at specific loads, idle and (i think full?) load

i initially thought it was just a simple matter of PC+components require (example) 500W, so a psu with 600W+ would be enough to power it, but i think i was wrong.. im rather confused at the moment to be completely honest lol😖
Sounds like you've learned a lot! :D

I can confirm: Buying a bigger than necessary PSU is not necessary. And most of what the PC needs is on the +12V rail. But you'll find if you buy a newer, non-cheap PSU, 98% of it's power is going to be on the +12V rail.

Beyond that, you have certain feature sets. Does the fan stay off at lower loads? Does the PSU let you monitor things like temperature, power usage, fan speed, etc.? Does the PSU have all of the DC cables fixed, some of them fixed or are all of the cables modular and can be removed and replaced.

These are some of the other factors that separate the different PSUs on the market, as well as warranty, support and availability.
 
Jan 22, 2020
24
3
15
0
Sounds like you've learned a lot! :D

I can confirm: Buying a bigger than necessary PSU is not necessary. And most of what the PC needs is on the +12V rail. But you'll find if you buy a newer, non-cheap PSU, 98% of it's power is going to be on the +12V rail.

Beyond that, you have certain feature sets. Does the fan stay off at lower loads? Does the PSU let you monitor things like temperature, power usage, fan speed, etc.? Does the PSU have all of the DC cables fixed, some of them fixed or are all of the cables modular and can be removed and replaced.

These are some of the other factors that separate the different PSUs on the market, as well as warranty, support and availability.
Thank you so much!
it helps so much more to have confirmation; it feels a lot clearer than it did a few minuets ago
I also remembered that looking out for safety features such as voltage, circuit and temperature protection is good as well to protect the things they are connected to, should anything happen

honestly, the people here have made my day! I was actually dreading the scenario i had earlier on, but coming here has made so much of a difference, I cant thank you guys enough!
 

jonnyguru

Distinguished
Thank you so much!
it helps so much more to have confirmation; it feels a lot clearer than it did a few minuets ago
I also remembered that looking out for safety features such as voltage, circuit and temperature protection is good as well to protect the things they are connected to, should anything happen
Yes. A good PSU will have a full gamut of protections in case something goes South. But again, as long as you're looking at something from a reputable brand, you shouldn't have to worry about the PSU not having protections.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS