Intel Overclocking Club

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Nov 4, 2019
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Just do a hard reset of the BIOS. Everything will be back to the stock configuration.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
Super informative answer i will try it today. First the removal of battery is an easy procedure or needs special equipment and technique? Secondly when i will re enter the BIOS, and boot up, i will have again the installed windows or i need to format and install again? And third, i presume i should unistall the asus ai suite 3 before all these?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
It requires your fingers, and in some cases, a screwdriver, for removing the graphics card fasteners that attach it to the back frame.

Should have nothing to do with Windows itself. If you used AI suite for your overclocking or other settings, then yes, you need to undo any changes in there by reverting to default settings and then uninstall. Overclocking, IMO, should never be done through desktop based utilities. There are a number of reasons for this. Too many to quickly cover but it's just a bad idea. If you are going to overclock, whether it's CPU or memory, do it within the BIOS where you can do proper testing for POST compatibility. For graphics cards, obviously that has to be done within the OS environment.
 
Nov 4, 2019
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It requires your fingers, and in some cases, a screwdriver, for removing the graphics card fasteners that attach it to the back frame.

Should have nothing to do with Windows itself. If you used AI suite for your overclocking or other settings, then yes, you need to undo any changes in there by reverting to default settings and then uninstall. Overclocking, IMO, should never be done through desktop based utilities. There are a number of reasons for this. Too many to quickly cover but it's just a bad idea. If you are going to overclock, whether it's CPU or memory, do it within the BIOS where you can do proper testing for POST compatibility. For graphics cards, obviously that has to be done within the OS environment.
hello friend! I have done the removal of battery pretty easily, reset the bios again and into the windows. I cant believe that i still see the hi clock speeds, its stuck on 4.8. The software from asus had been also uninstalled, and cleaned the pc with ccleaner. How is this possible? if i put in the bios to manually set the clock speeds indeed they get what i tell them, but the system isnt stable. How can the mobo hods that kind of memory? Its like the cpu only knows the upper limit by default
 
Nov 4, 2019
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When are where are you seeing the 4.8Ghz clock speed? You do realize that boost speeds anywhere from 4.7 to 5Ghz are normal, stock behavior on that CPU right?
i see them on the bios when you enter, also at the cpu z when i am in the windows. What do you mean? the stock speed isnt 3.6?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
3.6 is the "BASE" clock speed. That is where it will be IF there is nothing else going on AT ALL, and IF all low power state options are disabled. That is rare. There are almost always some kind of processes in use so there are rarely periods where all cores will be at 3.6Ghz, but if you don't see SOME cores sitting at 3.6Ghz, at least briefly, periodically, then there could be some configuration problems.

Download HWinfo. Install it. Run it and choose the "Sensors only" option. Uncheck the "Summary" option. Click ok. Scroll down to where you see the Core0, Core1, etc. Let the system sit idle for five or ten minutes. If none of the cores "relax" to at least 3.6Ghz or even less, then something isn't right.

It is probably worth making sure that in the control panel power options, you want to set it to Performance, and then, click on "change plan settings". Then click change advanced power settings. Scroll down and expand "Processor power management" and set the minimum to 8%. Make sure the maximum is set to 100%.

Save settings and exit. Also, in the BIOS, make sure that "Intel speed step" is enabled and that "Intel speed shift" is disabled. Those are my preferred settings for those two options. Speed shift has never seemed to work right on any of the Intel platforms for me, but speed step is necessary for low state CPU behavior.
 
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Nov 4, 2019
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3.6 is the "BASE" clock speed. That is where it will be IF there is nothing else going on AT ALL, and IF all low power state options are disabled. That is rare. There are almost always some kind of processes in use so there are rarely periods where all cores will be at 3.6Ghz, but if you don't see SOME cores sitting at 3.6Ghz, at least briefly, periodically, then there could be some configuration problems.

Download HWinfo. Install it. Run it and choose the "Sensors only" option. Uncheck the "Summary" option. Click ok. Scroll down to where you see the Core0, Core1, etc. Let the system sit idle for five or ten minutes. If none of the cores "relax" to at least 3.6Ghz or even less, then something isn't right.

It is probably worth making sure that in the control panel power options, you want to set it to Performance, and then, click on "change plan settings". Then click change advanced power settings. Scroll down and expand "Processor power management" and set the minimum to 8%. Make sure the maximum is set to 100%.

Save settings and exit. Also, in the BIOS, make sure that "Intel speed step" is enabled and that "Intel speed shift" is disabled. Those are my preferred settings for those two options. Speed shift has never seemed to work right on any of the Intel platforms for me, but speed step is necessary for low state CPU behavior.
screenshot

Although the power settings that you mentioned were as a policy minimum 100% and maximum 100% i change them, went into bios and disabled the intel speed shift but again stuck at 4.7 see also the screenshot from the hwinfo and the cpu z at idle
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The link for your screenshot doesn't work.

 

throwawayaccnt

Reputable
Apr 20, 2016
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Been fine tuning my OC on my 8700k, finally hit a sweet spot with 5.0Ghz @ 1.38v and a -2 AVX offset, I already put it through the ringer of Cinebench r15 & r20 and Intel Burn Test on 3 trials (standard, very high, maximum). Maxxed out at 82c on the Burn Test loads, keeping mid 30's at idle and 50's-60's during game loads. Still need to do a test with Aida64 or OCCT to make sure its completely stable but I'm satisfied so far.

Even more satisfied I can do it with a 240 AIO cooler (y) was worried that it wouldn't cut it. This is my first "real" attempt at OCing my processor
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Honestly, no offense intended, nothing you've run so far is anything I'd personally be inclined to use to validate an overclock whether I was testing for thermal compliance or testing for stability. And certainly you don't ever use the same utilities to test for both. It's a two, three and sometimes four part process, depending on how nit picky you want to get but at minimum it's a process that consists of first testing for thermal compliance, because stability doesn't matter, at ALL, if you are not thermally compliant, and THEN you test for stability once you know you are thermally compliant. Assuming of course you are able to POST and aren't instantly crashing when you open something. If you are, then you need to address that before you begin thermal compliance testing. Plus, the thermal compliance testing with Prime95 Small FFT no-AVX (AVX/AVX2 disabled in the pop up options) will give you a good BASIC stability assessment anyhow. Enough to be sure you're on the right path anyhow.

Certainly not enough to ensure stabilty but enough to ensure LACK of stability if you are trying to test thermals so you don't waste your time for nothing.

Full guidelines for MY preferred methodology, which will of course have detractors since there are a variety of opinions on everything under the sun, but which is a melting pot of personal experience, recommendations from web-wide enthusiast and overclocking community input and borrows from a variety of "best practices" overclocking guidelines in general, are available here. I would suggest you read it BEFORE doing any further overclocking, even if it's just to say "hell with you dude, I'm doing it my way". At least then you'll be better informed and have at least one persons concrete opinion on a method believed to be applicable to the widest variety of platforms.

 
Dec 25, 2019
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Hello, I'm new here, my best result for now:

Name: polarfrog
CPU: i9-9900K (liquid metal)
Motherboard: ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming-ITX/ac
CPU Voltage: 1.565V
CPU Bus Speed/Multiplier: 100*55
CPU Clock: 5.5GHz
CPU Cache: 5.0GHz
AVX = 5.2GHz
RAM: Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 4000MHz 16-21-21-41-2T 1.420V
Cooling: aggressive watercooling loop
OS:Windows 10 LTSC x64
CPU-Z Validation: https://valid.x86.fr/52l70b

Usually use:
CPU Voltage: 1.350V
CPU Bus Speed/Multiplier: 100*52
CPU Clock: 5.2GHz
CPU Cache: 4.8GHz
AVX = 5.0GHz
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Better. Now, if you can run that OC at 5.5Ghz for a 15 minute run of Small FFT on Prime 95, it would move it a little closer to legitimate. I really doubt you can do that, or anybody can for that matter without LN2 or a seriously competent custom loop at least (Don't know anything about your loop other than you say it's aggressive) , but it's worth a try. If you exceed 85°C I would stop the test and exit P95 immediately, just to be safe. If you can pass a few hours of Realbench, it would have ACTUAL legitimacy. But it's still impressive to even be able to hit that long enough to validate.

I don't much (And that's just me) get excited by configurations that can't be run stable and within thermal guidelines as a daily driver though, so perhaps I'm not the best one to judge such things. Not to mention at some point you have to worry that as a daily driver, are we subjecting our hardware to beyond acceptable levels that create serious potential for electromigration and premature failure. Sometimes the answer is no, it's fine, while other times the answer is resoundingly yes. In some cases, where it is yes, it's fine, because we don't care that much and are looking for achievements rather than longevity, but where longevity is a consideration then we need to educate ourselves about electromigration and then make informed decisions about whether or not that's what we actually want to be doing with our hardware and reduce to more realistic settings if not.
 

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