Intel Threatens to Sue HDCP Crack Users

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warezme

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hardware not necessary, software can emulate the hardware and use Intel's own chips to crack, then it's just a moving target, good luck with that Intel.
 

hokkdawg

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And they should sue people who use this. Seriously, does anyone really need to crack HDCP? Everything is already compliant, and everyone already knows how to pirate blu-rays by stripping DRM anyways. Anyone dumb enough to spend money trying to copy Intel's HDCP chips should be slapped.
 
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best of luck INTEL
when you start chasing simple users it will be the end of you...
hope that amd wont become so greedy company with time like intel did/
 

TheMadScientist

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I do not agree with Intel. A college level EE with an off-the-shelf FPGA could probably make a working decoder. Given how computers are increasing in speed, you could probably make a working device in software only, especially if you are only interested in a rip, not a real-time player.
 

saturnus

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The headline is incorrect. Intel is basically saying that they will sue anyone making a chip with the code imbedded, as there is no other way to use it. And rightly so I might add.

Nowhere is it even hinted that they would target end-users.
 

seezur

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[citation][nom]bluntobjection[/nom]Seems more like Intel is bluffing, I doubt Intel would be able to detect if you have said device installed in the first place.[/citation]

You are right, It would be extreamly difficult for them to detect a user of the chip but I think the threat is targeted at the builders of the chips that include a master key. If they went after all the users they would have to hire the RIAA's leagal team to keep up with all lawsuits.
 

zaznet

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The whole "has to be done in silicon" argument seems pretty short sighted. Just because that's how Intel did it originally doesn't mean a system bypassing it has to be done the same way.
 

amnotanoobie

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They are probably looking at anyone who would create a software/hardware around the use of the key.

It was done before with the key for the DVD and dvd ripping software.
 

BluntObjection

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[citation][nom]zaznet[/nom]The whole "has to be done in silicon" argument seems pretty short sighted. Just because that's how Intel did it originally doesn't mean a system bypassing it has to be done the same way.[/citation]

Like just stripping the DRM from BR disks and such?
*cough* previouslyestablishedtorrents *cough*

[citation][nom]seezur[/nom]You are right, It would be extreamly difficult for them to detect a user of the chip but I think the threat is targeted at the builders of the chips that include a master key. If they went after all the users they would have to hire the RIAA's leagal team to keep up with all lawsuits.[/citation]

"Good luck, I'm behind like 7 proxies!"

Also as stated above the heading is misleading, reading the Wired.com article will clear up the vague details left by Toms.
 

flachet

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I plan on having said device, so Intel can feel free to bring it on. Its my chip, attached to my hardware. Good luck with that in court.
 

DjEaZy

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... Intel Threatens to Sue HDCP Crack Users, but will be Charging $50 to Unlock CPU's Full Features... go F&#K your self... what is wrong with intel... i would say... everything....
 

x3style

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You are right, It would be extremely difficult for them to detect a user of the chip but I think the threat is targeted at the builders of the chips that include a master key
Like you can't make a chip that you can input any key in there? Plug into USB -> copypasta the key and move on it doesn't have to have the key right of the production line.
 
I'm sure this HDCP crack will be used for software rippers. Of course you would want a hardware implementation since it would be so much faster, but you're only going to rip the thing once, so I chalk Intel's statement up to FUD.
 

kinggraves

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HDCP was one of the worst ideas ever, good riddance. HDMI is just now catching up with what an RJ45 could've done 10 years ago. It set the HD trend back several years since slow adopters had to buy a new HDCP monitor and HDCP video card and HDCP cabling which got along with the HDCP software.
At least they kept the AV receiver companies in business with how hard it was to set up a "protected path" with a PC.
"Oops, something didn't get along and now your thousand dollar setup is worthless. Too bad, we still have all your money"
 

marthisdil

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[citation][nom]flachet[/nom]I plan on having said device, so Intel can feel free to bring it on. Its my chip, attached to my hardware. Good luck with that in court.[/citation]Except that Intel will sue the manufacturer of said chip, and will then, as part of them winning the court case, also gain access to all that purchased them, and they can, and will have easy method of tracking you down. It's not difficult.
 

marthisdil

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[citation][nom]hardgrow[/nom]best of luck INTELwhen you start chasing simple users it will be the end of you...hope that amd wont become so greedy company with time like intel did/[/citation]AMD won't be greedy - they can't be - they are losing money left and right, and their chips suck compared to Intel chips....nothing to be greedy
 
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