Intel Xeon E5-2600: Doing Damage With Two Eight-Core CPUs

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Let me just say this, from the perspective of a corporation running literally thousands of servers distributed between two Tier 3 data centers.

We don't have the time or inclination to benchmark any CPUs, let alone server class. For us it's all about business requirements and the bottom line. Our current cost for a quad core Intel CPU in the blades we buy is double that for a sixteen core AMD CPU. About the only reason we buy Intel is to constrain costs for enterprise applications like Oracle databases which are licensed on a per core basis. For them we want the most efficient cores possible. For Microsoft and VMWare applications it's all about putting the greatest number of cores possible under each very expensive processor based license. Over the last seven years we have not had a single server class AMD CPU fail.

In the real world, where servers are just another commodity, server hardware represents a relatively small percentage of total application costs. Switching and storage hardware costs routinely exceed server costs. Application software costs dwarf application hardware costs, and application staff are more expensive than both combined.

The lesson is that raw performance numbers are all well and good, but hardly enough to justify the massive price premiums the vendors of those items demand. Especially in a world in which server resource (primarily CPU and Memory) utilization, despite virtualization efforts, is routinely less than 20%. Will there be areas in which the new Intel CPUs offer value? Of course there will. But to tar all server requirements with the same broad brush is to ignore application business requirements. When you do that you ignore business rule number 1 - and that is to remain profitable.
 

brightsmith

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Chris Angelini, please let me know WEI (Windows Experience Index) score for the processor (CPU)? Is the score reached 7.9 (perfect)? I am very curious about this.
 

Raptor2099

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As a systems builder and admin, I'd like to see benchmarks of these monster server machines done with a vsphere/vmware infrastructure environment with multiple virtualized machines running at the same time to show the performance in a situation like that.
 
[citation][nom]brightsmith[/nom]Chris Angelini, please let me know WEI (Windows Experience Index) score for the processor (CPU)? Is the score reached 7.9 (perfect)? I am very curious about this.[/citation]

I understand that someone might want to know the score, but hopefully you realize that the WEI doesn't matter whatsoever, especially since it even varies with the same CPU (I don't mean the average score that obviously depends on the other hardware, but the CPU score itself) and because it isn't representative of real-world performance. Heck, it's even less representative than most synthetic benchmarks are.

[citation][nom]Raptor2099[/nom]As a systems builder and admin, I'd like to see benchmarks of these monster server machines done with a vsphere/vmware infrastructure environment with multiple virtualized machines running at the same time to show the performance in a situation like that.[/citation]

That would definitely be something worth looking into, but I don't think that Tom's will do it, at least not for a while.
 
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