Intel's Future Chips: News, Rumours & Reviews

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aldaia

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Maybe my numbers where 2018.

I was wrong in another aspect. As of today, regarding market cap: Samsung is back to #1, TSM is #2 and intel #3
They are so close that positions might be reversed on Monday. The main diference is that TSM is purely foundry and nothing else. While for the other two the foundry is only a portion of the company.
 

aldaia

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About 10 nm
Bob Swan: "In the aggregate, we won't have a huge percentage of our overall company volume in the second half of the year. It will grow as we exit the year and become a much bigger part of our overall volume in 2021.”

Maybe my brain is tricking me but I have the impression that I heard the same for 2020 last year. And for 2019 in 2018 and I think also for 2018 in 2017.
I really hope this time it's for real.
 

InvalidError

Titan
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Maybe my brain is tricking me but I have the impression that I heard the same for 2020 last year. And for 2019 in 2018 and I think also for 2018 in 2017.
Kind of funny how Intel claims 10nm is ahead of where it wanted it to be when 10nm is already five years late on mass-manufacturing relative to what the original time table was before Intel ran into consecutive brick walls in its rush to 14nm, then repeatedly smashed into immovable objects along the way to 10nm which caused the originally delayed 10nm to get delayed another two or three years.

Intel must have a really creative definition of "being ahead", looks more like years behind to me.
 

aldaia

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22 nm was about 4 years ahead of TSMC 16 nm
14 nm was about 3.5 years ahead of TSMC 10 nm
Today TSMC 7nm is a mature process and we are still waiting for intel 10nm to be truly high volume.
When they manage that, TSM will be high volume in 5nm.
I also heard that we will not see 7 nm processors at intel until 2022 (and i bet not high volume) , by that time TSMC will be at its 3 nm node.
Even if node names are just that, names, they have gone from a 3-4 year advantage over foundries to trail them by nearly a couple years.

Although I expected that to happen (I firmly believe the pure play foundry model has its advantages), never expected to happen so fast.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Kind of funny how Intel claims 10nm is ahead of where it wanted it to be when 10nm is already five years late on mass-manufacturing relative to what the original time table was before Intel ran into consecutive brick walls in its rush to 14nm, then repeatedly smashed into immovable objects along the way to 10nm which caused the originally delayed 10nm to get delayed another two or three years.

Intel must have a really creative definition of "being ahead", looks more like years behind to me.
Yes, to me too.

But you know, when you're Intel, it's like being Trump. You can say whatever you want and then spin it any way you want, and it's ok.

Intel - We are going to land on number 5.

Dealer - It landed on number 6

Intel - Yes, that is what we said. We intended for it to land on number 6 all along.

Dealer - Ok.
 
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jimmysmitty

Champion
Moderator
About 10 nm
Bob Swan: "In the aggregate, we won't have a huge percentage of our overall company volume in the second half of the year. It will grow as we exit the year and become a much bigger part of our overall volume in 2021.”

Maybe my brain is tricking me but I have the impression that I heard the same for 2020 last year. And for 2019 in 2018 and I think also for 2018 in 2017.
I really hope this time it's for real.
The biggest difference is that Intel has actual shipping 10nm parts this time and the last few they did not (minus that weird one off for China).

I don't think 10nm needs to be worried about but I also don't think 10nm will be as heavily used as other nodes and we will see a move to 7nm very fast in some markets.


22 nm was about 4 years ahead of TSMC 16 nm
14 nm was about 3.5 years ahead of TSMC 10 nm
Today TSMC 7nm is a mature process and we are still waiting for intel 10nm to be truly high volume.
When they manage that, TSM will be high volume in 5nm.
I also heard that we will not see 7 nm processors at intel until 2022 (and i bet not high volume) , by that time TSMC will be at its 3 nm node.
Even if node names are just that, names, they have gone from a 3-4 year advantage over foundries to trail them by nearly a couple years.

Although I expected that to happen (I firmly believe the pure play foundry model has its advantages), never expected to happen so fast.
Considering the limitations we know are coming up I bet any real 3nm will be many years off for everyone. Silicon is very much at its end and I have not seen any further news or advancements in finding its successor.
 

aldaia

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Rumor of the day: Intel is looking to offload some 14nm capacity by producing low en processors (celerons & pentiums) using an external foundry.

The fun aspect of the rumor is that the winner is:

.... drums playing ....

GlobalFoundries
 
Rumor of the day: Intel is looking to offload some 14nm capacity by producing low en processors (celerons & pentiums) using an external foundry.

The fun aspect of the rumor is that the winner is:

.... drums playing ....

GlobalFoundries
Which makes sense; they have the most capacity to spare.
 

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