[SOLVED] Is stock cooler enough for Ryzen 7 3700x?

Jul 30, 2020
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Hello everyone!
Will AMD Ryzen 7 3700x stock cooler be enough for my build?

Here are my specs:
-AMD Ryzen 7 3700x 3.6GHz AM4 Processor
-MSI MPG X570 GAMING EDGE WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard
-Kingston HyperX Predator 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory
-Samsung 860 Evo 250 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive
-Western Digital Blue 1 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive
-GIGABYTE GeForce GTX1650 4096Mb D6 OC Video Card
-SeaSonic FOCUS 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply
-Be Quiet! Pure Base 600 case

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Nope to all of the above. Ryzens don't work that way.
Ryzens are a dynamic based cpu, they are not Intel with a set turbo speed. They'll boost according to voltages, currant and temp. If you put a better cooler on the cpu, it'll boost higher, but consequently will run the same temps. It'll do that until it hits power limits. The only time a Ryzen runs cooler is if you go overboard on the cooling, allowing the cpu to hit its power limits and have enough capacity left over to cool the cpu over and above its normal levels.

For instance, if running a decent load at stock and getting 80°C at 3.7GHz, adding a hyper212 will allow 80°C but a 3.9GHz boost. Adding a bigger cooler you'll get 4.1GHz etc. It's only when boost is as high as you can go, that the cooler will start seeing lower temps.

Overclocking by setting definitive voltage and speed levels will cancel the dynamic boost and the cpu will cool as it will, same as Intel.

As to whether the stock cooler is enough, yes, it's plenty at stock performance and stock boost, although you might not be happy with the volume of the fan or the boost speeds with heavier, high thread loads. That's where many aftermarket coolers have the advantage, apart from allowing a higher boost level. You'll not really see temps dropping unless you go with a really decent capacity cooler or better, but that's because it's a Ryzen, not an intel, so behaves differently.
 
Jul 30, 2020
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Yes, your temperatures will be around average in idle and under load with the correct installation of thermal paste, your cooler, your airflow and ambient temps, unless you're doing some serious overclocking, it will do fine, but you should always aim for aftermarket coolers if you have the budget as they will run your CPU cooler, more quieter, and give you the ability to overclock heavily with no issues.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Nope to all of the above. Ryzens don't work that way.
Ryzens are a dynamic based cpu, they are not Intel with a set turbo speed. They'll boost according to voltages, currant and temp. If you put a better cooler on the cpu, it'll boost higher, but consequently will run the same temps. It'll do that until it hits power limits. The only time a Ryzen runs cooler is if you go overboard on the cooling, allowing the cpu to hit its power limits and have enough capacity left over to cool the cpu over and above its normal levels.

For instance, if running a decent load at stock and getting 80°C at 3.7GHz, adding a hyper212 will allow 80°C but a 3.9GHz boost. Adding a bigger cooler you'll get 4.1GHz etc. It's only when boost is as high as you can go, that the cooler will start seeing lower temps.

Overclocking by setting definitive voltage and speed levels will cancel the dynamic boost and the cpu will cool as it will, same as Intel.

As to whether the stock cooler is enough, yes, it's plenty at stock performance and stock boost, although you might not be happy with the volume of the fan or the boost speeds with heavier, high thread loads. That's where many aftermarket coolers have the advantage, apart from allowing a higher boost level. You'll not really see temps dropping unless you go with a really decent capacity cooler or better, but that's because it's a Ryzen, not an intel, so behaves differently.
 

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